YMMV / Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney

Take general series tropes to Ace Attorney, and take tropes specific to the Phoenix arc, Investigations, or Dual Destinies to those pages, please.
  • Accidental Aesop: Don't use your daughter as a pawn in a criminal scheme. In addition to the character who did this in the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Trilogy, there are about four characters who do it in Apollo Justice: Ace Attorney. Phoenix Wright had his daughter give Apollo Justice evidence that Phoenix had forged so that Apollo would present it in court; Drew Misham had his daughter forge paintings and evidence for money; Magnifi Gramarye arguably did this when he blackmailed his students with something they had done to his daughter while apparently not doing much to help her; and Zak Gramarye had his daughter help him escape from his murder trial.
    • Phoenix's example is particularly noteworthy because he exploited the exact same trap that killed his own career, right down to using the same person from his own experience to carry it out.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: As great as taking down Kristoph in the final case is, the final trial day is practically an automated level, with only one part where you have to present something and only one cross-examination segment (Both at the beginning of the trial), which involves using the bracelet to spot one of the most obvious tells in the entire game. He gives a MUCH better fight in the first case, which says a lot. Heck, the Pursuit theme doesn't even play in the last trial day.
  • Arc Fatigue: Turnabout Serenade takes forever to finish. The lack of evidence exacerbates it. Making it less of a regular case, and more like one long guessing game. With Apollo trying to prove theories and hypothesis with only logic and the smallest amount of evidence. Worse, the player, using basic logic, can point out that the crime the defendant is accused of is all-but physically impossible... but the case still goes on.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Klavier Gavin. Many dislike him because he's much less of a hardass on the defense and because of the typical Bishounen tendencies, and see him as a Designated Villain at best. Others like him because of his surprisingly helpful attitude and aversion of the Amoral Attorney trope, as well as his zany rock star attitude and career, and point out that (for the most part) the prosecutor isn't meant to be a villain; they're simply there to present counterarguments to the defense, something that was established in the Phoenix arc between Phoenix and Edgeworth. General opinion of him seems to have swung more positively since, with some lamenting that he was Demoted to Extra in Dual Destinies.
    • Apollo Justice is either a fresh take on the Ace Attorney series after three games of Phoenix Wright, or a Replacement Scrappy (see below).
  • Broken Base: Apollo Justice has divided fans into a Phoenix Wright camp and an Apollo Justice camp. Some think the promised fifth game should bring Phoenix back as a lawyer, others believe that Apollo is a good character who just needs another game or two to develop.
    • And with the confirmation that it will be Phoenix-centric, fans continue to disagree but are being even more verbal about it.
    • It's also possible to Take a Third Option and enjoy both characters but dislike the time skip and related case. Considering that the Phoenix arc ended on an Earn Your Happy Ending moment, Apollo Justice opens with information that's something of a moodkiller, to put it mildly. It's hard to tell whether people hate Apollo himself, the re-characterized Phoenix, or what the Apollo Justice game itself did to the canon timeline (which goes way beyond Fanon Discontinuity territory).
    • With the release of Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Dual Destinies , Capcom themselves decided to Take a Third Option, with both lawyers being playable at different points in the game.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: It's pretty easy to figure out that the amnesiac Lamiroir is actually Thalassa Gramarye due to their identical hairstyles.
  • Complete Monster: Kristoph Gavin is introduced as a supposedly helpful mentor. He is also the first man responsible for ushering in “The Dark Age Of The Law” by getting Phoenix Wright disbarred. Kristoph ended up taking a massive blow to his ego when a magician and prospective client, Zak, rejected Kristoph as his lawyer. When Zak hired Phoenix instead of him due to a poker game, a furious Kristoph decided to get revenge. He had gotten a shy artist named Vera to unknowingly create fake evidence for the trial, but after Phoenix was hired, Kristoph used the evidence to get him disbarred. Kristoph also manipulated his own brother, prosecutor Klavier, by using him to disbar Phoenix and cheating the honorable Klavier out of a fair trial. Klavier, who knew something wasn't right, was haunted for years. When Zak resurfaced under a new identity years later, Kristoph took the chance to murder him and frame Phoenix. After this, it was revealed Kristoph had poisoned Vera and her father Drew, intending both to die. Vera survived, barely. To pour salt on the wound, Kristoph gloated how Apollo and Phoenix had triggered his plan-their questioning caused Vera to bite her nails- when he had planted the poison as nail polish, knowing her nervous habit. He had even started poisoning her when she was only twelve. After her survival, Kristoph simply enjoyed seeing Vera face conviction for her own father's murder. In the end, he was little but a cruel, petty, selfish man obsessed with glory and destroying those who stood in his way.
  • Disappointing Last Level: Turnabout Succession to some people. Aside from the final trial day being a major anticlimax (as noted above), other complaints about the case include the poor execution of the MASON system, which has two pieces of evidence travel backwards through time, and Phoenix and Gumshoe suddenly taking a level in jerkass during the trial seven years ago. While the case isn't hated like Turnabout Serenade, a lot of fans agree it's a mediocre finale case.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Valant Gramarye: Ok, Zak was a jerk; almost definitely more of a jerk than Valant. But that doesn't excuse Valant for deciding to frame him for murder, especially when the main motives were jealousy and money. Try telling that to Valant fans though.
    • Kristoph also gets this treatment.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Kristoph Gavin.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Some people just can't accept where Apollo Justice took Phoenix's character.
  • Foe Yay: Phoenix and Kristoph.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The whole incident about Phoenix Wright getting hit by a car and flung into a pole and only suffered a sprained ankle. With his inclusion in Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, he had to contend with a variety of attacks, such as She-Hulk's Level 3 Hyper, which involves getting hit by a car (Sunday Driver, according to her), and her new attack in Ultimate swinging a pole. The best part is that the hit and run incident in the game took place on a Sunday.
    • At the end of Case 2, one of the characters says simply, "Please understand." Remember that this game came out years before Nintendo started doing the Nintendo Direct series.
  • Ho Yay: Has a page for it.
  • Idiot Plot: Many people think this about case 4-3, which has all the characters think it's perfectly feasible for a prepubescent boy to use an incredibly powerful revolver without injury, carry a 250lbs man across an arena, and even for the boy to be a secret Interpol agent based on a bit of bloody writing, despite that having been used as a red herring as far back as Phoenix's second case. Even Apollo doesn't dispute the feasibility of the accusations, just that Machi was the one who did it. For this reason, the case is one of two (the other being case 2-3) that are generally considered to be the worst in the whole franchise. Shu Takumi has since admitted to the flaws in the case's storyline, and revealed that he was working on the assumption that Daryan was using his position in the police to manipulate the investigation and throw Machi under the bus for his own crimes, but forgot to make this clear in the dialogue.
    • Case 4-3 has another idiot moment from one of the witnesses who fails to mention one vital detail in her testimony; she heard the crime take place during the second act and not the third when everyone thought it took place. That could have saved a lot of headaches.
    • Worse yet, neither the accused nor the real perpetrator have ever worn gloves throughout the entire incident, meaning someone's set of fingerprints should've been all over the murder weapon. Still, no one on either side bothers to discuss fingerprint analysis, despite this usually being one of the first pieces of evidence brought up in a case.
  • Incest Yay Shipping: It would count as Surprise Incest, but some people ship Apollo and Trucy, who are half-siblings. Kristoph and Klavier also have a sizeable amount of shippers, but many times it's portrayed at varying levels of unhealthy most likely because of the following trope.
  • Memetic Molester: Kristoph.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • It's standard for the guilty one to go completely batshit crazy in fury or amazement that their plan has been ruined. However, it gets even scarier with Kristoph, who slams his hand into the desk, his hair flies up as if he's going Super Saiyan, and after that's done, his hair is in a complete mess, his face looks just plain demented, and a psycho-stare that is scarier then even Damon Gant's! That. Is. Scary. And when you win the case, Kristoph snaps. With his hair still a complete mess, he puts a hand to his face, faces the sky, and just laughs. It's clear that he's gone completely insane when faced by the turn of events. He's lost everything by your victory; seven years of planning, gone. And you don't hear anything. You don't hear a sound byte of the laugh, there's no box saying "ha ha ha". No, what there is is a text-based "voice-over" describing the aftermath of the case, and how the killer... laughed, all while you watch his final breakdown in utter silence.
    • Do NOT perceive Spark Brushel while he's smiling widely.
  • Player Punch: Mixes with But Thou Must in the flashback trial. Phoenix is blissfully unaware that he's about to present forged evidence, thinking he's riding the easy train to victory. Both the circumstances and the context of the rest of the game already make the player aware this will not end well but they are dragged kicking and screaming into presenting the evidence to move the plot forward. Really makes the player feel like they're responsible for Phoenix's disbarment.
  • Replacement Scrappy: Apollo, to some. Trucy mixes this with Annoying Video Game Helper tendencies ("Take that memory, bury it deep down inside you, and never speak of it again"), but your mileage will vary on how long the trope fits.
    • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: According to a character poll after the release of Dual Destinies, Apollo is now considered the most popular character. He even beat Edgeworth.
    • While not outright hated, Klavier Gavin is not as well liked as some of the other prosecutors by the fandom, mostly because of his Designated Villain status removes the antagonistic conflict that made the other prosecutors rivals. Again, how long this trope fits is subjective.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Perceiving Kristoph Gavin in the fourth case reveals that under his Scary Shiny Glasses is a rather intense Death Glare, giving a whole new meaning to the animation whenever it is used in the first case, such as after Wright suggests there may have been a fourth person in the room.
  • The Scrappy: Zak Gramarye. Almost everyone is in agreement that he is both a despicable human being and nonsensically and inconsistently written (at times he's written as if he and Shadi Smith aren't even the same person). Most of his fans only like him ironically, for the sheer comedic value there is in shining a light on how heartless his actions were.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: The various "scientific investigation" segments were widely regarded as being boring and slowing down the game's story. As a result, the two Investigations games and Dual Destinies dialled it back to only having fingerprinting and luminol testing segments.
  • Squick: Shut up about your panties! ("Panties!") It's even in-universe Squick for Apollo.*
  • That One Level:
    • Case 4-3 (Turnabout Serenade) thanks to been a major Idiot Plot that both fails to make sense and makes actually arguing anything about it a challenge. And some of the logical leaps the player is called on to make verge on the nonsensical. It also makes the player watch an long unskippable video multiple times.
    • A lot of fans agree that Spark Brushel's nervous habit is particularly hard to spot.
  • Unfortunate Character Design: Some people find Daryan Crescend's hairdo rather... phallic. With his abrasive, unpleasant personality, players have taken to calling him a figurative and literal dickhead.
  • The Untwist: You would think that a prosecutor in this series being this nice and friendly outside of court to you must have something to hide. Nope! Klavier Gavin has no dark secrets. He really is just a good guy who's genuinely dedicated to truth and justice.
  • Values Dissonance: A recurring fact throughout the game is that it's hard for civilians to acquire guns. This is true in Japan, which has strict gun laws, but in America it's relatively easy to acquire firearms.
    • The same goes for gambling, which is illegal in Japan but commonplace in the United States.
  • The Woobie: Apollo is either this or a Chew Toy, depending on how funny you think his suffering is.
    • Vera. Dear god, Vera.
    • Possibly Trucy as well, if you take some lines from Phoenix at the end of the game into consideration.
    • Wocky is a Jerkass Woobie, undoubtedly the worst client Apollo gets. In fact he's worse than almost all of Phoenix's defendants because he doesn't come around by the end. But still, almost getting himself killed and all, lied to concerning this, then realising the truth about Alita...He does start to cry at the very end, then abruptly returns to his "gangster" persona before exiting at top speed. It's implied he understands what his father has done for him and that the family will be okay.
      • The credit sequence does show Wocky making his own baked goods for the family's new, legitimate business venture (albeit in typical shouty fashion), so presumably he at least partially came around.
    • Klavier. Poor guy has to prosecute his bandmate and later his own brother. To make the gravity of these actions even greater, this is a prosecutor who simply sees prosecution as a way of seeking the truth rather an excuse to antagonize defense attorneys.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney