Video Game / Torchlight II

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/torchlight2_7596.jpg
The playable classes, clockwise from the top: Embermage, Berserker, Outlander and Engineer.

Torchlight II (2012) is an action role-playing game developed by Runic Games. As you might infer, it is the direct sequel to Torchlight.

It adds Co-Op Multiplayer to the franchise (a lack of which was a near-universal criticism of the original, especially since Diablo II was doing it a decade ago) and is (or was) meant to serve as a stepping-stone towards the proposed Torchlight MMO. The playable classes include:

Originally meant to be out in Spring of 2011, it faced some delays, but it finally came out in September 20, 2012. It was so popular that it actually crashed the registration servers on launch day, causing some tongue-in-cheek comparisons with the launch of another big Action-RPG.

A fair share of the original's gameplay-related tropes still apply, but a lot of new features and mechanics make debut here, so be sure to list the new stuff on this page. Also, beware of some unmarked Late Arrival Spoilers.


This game provides examples of:

  • Abnormal Ammo: "Corpsefire Skeletons," who attack you by... Pulling off their skulls and throwing them at you. They are difficult to take seriously. There's also the more serious "Nether Plaguebearers", who fire out diseased pustules from their backs that swell up and explode an area.
  • Action Bomb: The spider mines, one of the Engineer's mechanical constructs. There's also enemy versions that look like clockwork beetles, deployed by Ezrohir.
  • Alien Blood: an extremely notable feature is that different types of enemies have different blood colours: beasts and humanoids have red blood, insectoids and corporeal undeads have green blood (which make sense since their bodies are full of haemolymph and pus, respectively) and the Netherim have bluish-purple blood.
  • All-Powerful Bystander: The second act has you asking a powerful Djinni named Fazeer Shah, who is stated to be stronger than the guardians themselves, for help. He agrees to help only if you entertain him with some quests and in the end he only tricks you into fulfilling his end of the bargain yourself, ridding him of his rival in the process. More specifically, the defeat of Ezrek Khan also frees the Guardian - which your character was trying to do in the first place - without Fazeer having to lift a finger.
  • An Axe to Grind: Axes and great axes have no damage range, making their DPS consistent sans fumbles and Critical Hits.
  • An Ice Person: The Embermage's Frost skill tree can make them this. The Berserker's Tundra skills contain plenty of ice related skills in a different form along with two electricity examples.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: All of those introduced in the 1st game come back, (shared stash, auto-looting gold, Vendor Trash disposing pets, etc.) but a share of new handy tweaks have been included now. For example...
    • Each hub area has a "tutor" that can refund (up to) your last 3 spent skill points. So, if you spend a point in a skill that's not of your liking, you can reverse that decision as long as you do it soon enough.
    • You can re-buy any item you have sold at the same price you sold it. This is to avoid paying a hefty sum for an item that you might have sold by accident while madly clicking through your disposable gearnote .
    • Level-Locked Loot is present, with a level and stat(s) requirement, just like in the first game and the Diablo series. However, unlike the original game, where you have to match the level AND the stat(s) requirements in order to equip something, here you can fulfill either of them in order use the gear. This means that now you can wield heavy weapons even with no Strength upgrades as long as you reach the appropriate level, or wear high-level armor earlier as long as you distribute your stats in the right way. Though there are some pieces of Unique equipment, especially Legendary weapons, that require Level 101 which cannot be reached without the usage of mods, requiring you to distribute stats (or rely on Borris the Stout to give attribute enchantments) in order to use them at all.
    • One particular aversion: for the Engineer at least, some of the summoned allies (particularly the Healing Bot and Immobilization Copter that last indefinitely) will un-summon whenever you switch to a new map. This is not really dangerous to you, but it is definitely annoying until you start reflexively summoning them every map change.
  • Apocalyptic Log: There are several diary entries spread around the Abandoned Sawmill, detailing how the inhabitants were offed by werewolves in the span of five days.
  • Artifact Title: The eponymous town is destroyed in the opening cutscene and doesn't even appear in the game, aside from a small cameo as a (still burning) landmark in the loading screen's maps.
  • Asteroids Monster: Now some bosses (and Champions) have the "Dividing" trait. What this means is that when they die, they spawn two new bosses of the same mob type. These new ones are at least partially weaker, but the sudden jump in incoming DPS can still prove lethal. However it's also beneficial as both of the newly spawned champions reward a similar lump of experience and fame for killing them
  • Automatic Crossbow: Crossbows actually fire faster than regular bows of the same level and have better range but they deal less DPS.
  • Back from the Dead: Some certain Wolfpack Bosses from the original (The Banshee Trio) are back for another round here.
  • Bears Are Bad News: The Sturmbeornen, which are bear-like humanoids.
  • Beat the Curse Out of Him: You free the enslaved and brainwashed Mana Guardian by attacking in a bossfight until its armor breaks and frees it.
  • BFG: Cannons. They could well be mounted on the side of a ship and not look out of place, and yet your character lugs them around like nothing. One wonders how the recoil doesn't knock the thing out of their grip. The Engineer's Construction skill tree contains a couple of Cannon-based skills.
  • BFS: Great swords. Like regular swords, they're average in speed and damage range.
  • Betting Mini-Game: You can rescue a shady looking merchant during a side quest in Act II, after which you can go to him to purchase unidentified items.
  • Bigger Bad: The Nether King.
  • Blade on a Stick: Pole arms are slow but have the longest reach of any melee weapon type.
  • Body Horror/Lovecraftian Superpower: Anyone corrupted by the Nether tends to undergo some rather nasty mutations. Mostly tentacles sprouting out of their faces.
  • Boring but Practical:
    • The Engineer's healing robot. Not too flashy, doesn't do any damage, but when you forget to have it deployed, it shows.
    • Passive skills. Unlike Active Skills, which evolve via the Tier system, investing points in them only increases the percentage bonus they grant to you, which is not too exciting... But spending a hefty amount of skill-points in them is still highly recommended, as they generate nice bonuses that scale with your stats and/or equipment and increase the chance of triggering random beneficial effects. Let's put it this way:
    Northernlion: (...) I feel like I try to be a 'responsible dad', and the kids are like: "Come on dad! Get the skill where you transform into a wolf" and I'm like: "No! You gotta get those percentage bonuses, they're gonna help you in the late game"
  • Brutal Bonus Level: Tarroch's Tomb, only available in a New Game+. It's an 10-wave arena fight with enemy spawns that start at level 100 (100 being the maximum for characters) and the final wave contains level 200 enemies. There's treasure whose value increases depending on waves beaten, but if the player dies, the treasure disappears- which, considering the enemies' levels, can occur easily.
  • Chainsaw-Grip BFG: Cannons are held in such a way.
  • Charged Attack: Of the 'collect' type. The Engineer's charge meter has five "pips" that fill as you deal more damage through attacks and certain skills. Many skills benefit from the charge in three ways, consuming a single pip to make it stronger, depleting the entire meter to increase the effects based on how full it was or passively benefiting from the meter without affecting it.
  • Collapsing Ceiling Boss: Quite a number of bosses have an ability to drop chunks of objects from the ceiling, such as General Grell and the Manticore's Mate.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: In addition to loot enchantments (green for uncommons, blue for rares, orange for unique artifacts), enemies' lifebars now give you a hand. Standard mooks are red; random Boss versions of mooks are purple; and plot-critical bosses are orange.
  • Color Coded Item Tiers: The game has white (common) < green(uncommon) < blue (rare) < orange (unique) < red (legendary), with purple being reserved for quest-related items.
  • Confusion Fu: One of the Embermage passives makes regular attacks with a wand have a chance of causing "bizarre, random elemental disturbances", which can be anything from a random bat appearing and then blowing up on your enemies' faces to a giant meteor dropping out of nowhere on their heads. Having high points in this skill makes running out of mana an interesting experience.
    • It also applies to certain spells, including the starting Magma Missiles spell, that quickly escalates into a chain reaction of randomly over the top destruction that has to be seen to be believed (for optimal chaos, try it with the Shock Bolts skill, which pierces enemies and fires several bolts at once, each hit having a chance to trigger an effect. It's a thing of beauty). Their Prismatic Rift passive also has a chance to teleport enemies away randomly when struck and inflict a random elemental effect on them.
  • Covers Always Lie: The 'box art' shown above (the actual game doesn't have a boxed version yet) and certain loading screens depict the male Engineer as a hefty Space Marine right out of Warhammer40k (epic chin included) but his real character model isn't half as buff and he doesn't get that particular armor in-game. The male Berserker is also a lot wirier than the art indicates but at least he does get claws similar to those in the art (unfortunately they're low tier). On the flipside, the female character models are more modest than their art too.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: Various abilities of skills, ember or weapons can decrease a target's defense. Ranging from being a side effect such as Blast Cannon, Ravage, Rapidfire, Iron Embers, etc. to being a direct debuff casted on them such as Blade Pact.
  • Damage Over Time: Inflicting burned, chilled or poisoned produces damage over time to the enemy, weapons or certain Blood Embers fitted into those weapons have a "convey -X physical damage over Y seconds", implying a bleeding like status. Certain skills such as Permafrost, Cursed Daggers or Firebombs inflict damage over time for those hit or caught in it's area of effect.
  • Defeat Equals Explosion: Many bosses and mechanical enemies will explode harmlessly when killed, including Ezrohir infantry which is odd, considering the dead-before-you-got-there corpses (like the dead Vanquisher Guards of Act I) in the Ossean Wastes can be dead Ezrohir which don't explode.
  • Denial of Diagonal Attack: Pistols, bows, crossbows, wands and many skills will aim up or down if your enemy is above or below but the basic attacks of shotgonnes and cannons don't have this as they attack in a cone in front of you. Even with the other weapons, the game tends to move your character in a spot that would block your shots anyways, leaving you to wait for the enemy to drop down, run up to where the enemy is or use a skill that calls down an attack in that area (Infernal Collapse, Glacial Shatter, etc.)
  • Difficulty Spike: As in the first game, the final dungeon starts featuring a lot of enemies who can kill you in only a few hits. Even better, there are grills on the floor that spurt fire—fire that deals about an entire lifebar's worth of damage. Avoiding them whilst traveling is easy. Avoiding them in a fight, with a bunch of other attacks coming your way...
  • Disconnected Side Area: Some of the secret areas, most notably those in the Wellspring and Watchweald Temples, are shown like this. Oftentimes, one needs to break a special urn or activate a switch to gain access to them. Some of these hidden switches will emit sparkles to denote an interactive object and will highlight when you move your mouse over them.
  • Double Meaning Title: The quest "A Shattered Visage Lies". The "lies" can refer to the Faceless King's power lying dormant, and it also refers to the lie he's telling you in order him to gain back his power.
  • Doppelgänger Attack: Ezrek Khan, during the last two times you fight him directly, will spawn two clones of himself. They do not have much health but they can use the same spells as him (excluding the cloning).
  • Drop the Hammer: Great hammers and maces are slow but convey a chance to interrupt enemies unless they resist it or are completely immune. Some of the great hammers and even some maces are giant wrenches, crossing into Wrench Whack.
  • Dual Boss: The Manticore is initially fought as a single boss with flunkies, but once it reaches half health, it summons its mate into the fight, who also has a ton of health and fights similarly.
  • Dueling Games: With Diablo III.
  • Easy Levels, Hard Bosses: For melee characters. Their higher damage output allows them to gib enemy packs before taking too much damage, but against bosses, who can take at least tens of hits and deal out heavy wide-area attacks, they have to play a lot more strategically.
  • Eldritch Abomination:
    • The King in Masks, the boss of a sidequest, looks like a six-armed mummy with three masks floating around his head, got locked up in a vault under the sea, back when there actually was a sea in the salt barrens, and wants to unite Zeraphi and Ezrohir by enslaving both (which is why he got locked up in the first place). Luckily, this Cthulhu isn't that hard to punch out.
    • The Nether is full of these, and they have tried to invade in the past. The Alchemist intends to let them in.
  • Eldritch Location: The Nether, and all places tainted by it. Of particular note is the Haunted Quarter, which appears to be a chunk of Zeryphesh floating in a void with purple mist, with hostile lightning storms and tentacles sprouting all over the place, and the Clockwork Core, several gigantic clanking gears floating above a pit of magma which separate the material realm from the nether.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": The Destroyer and The Alchemist are called by their class names from the original Torchlight while the Vanquisher now goes by 'Commander Vale'. She is the commander of the Vanquishers though.
  • Evil Counterpart: The Ezrohir have mooks that are based on each of the four classes- Marksmen attack with guns and spider mines like the Engineer, Snatchers have powerful melee and pull opponents towards him like the Berserker, Assassins can backflip and throw a spread of darts like the Outlander, and the Mages use powerful spells like the Embermage.
  • Evolving Attack: Each skill has three tiers met at 5, 10 and 15, respectively, and gain a tier bonus at each one. They might be drastic effects such as the Berserker throwing three Storm Hatchets at once instead of one or the Outlander's Shattering Glaive releasing fiery fissures upon impact. Some are more mundane such as the Embermage's Prismatic Bolt gaining a damage bonus with each tier or the Engineer's Blast Cannon increasing in chance to blind the enemy every tier.
  • Evolving Weapon: Certain unique weapons have an augment that is acquired when killing a requisite amount of enemies of a certain type. Skill kills will also count, the weapon just simply has to be equipped.
  • Fake Difficulty: By way of Interface Screw. Many of your important windows, like your Character screen, Skill Tree, inventory and pet inventory are easily accessed via little tabs that hang off the left and right side of your screen... sometimes too easily, if what you're actually trying to do is run somewhere during battle. (Note that the game does not feature Pausable Realtime and you are still able to fight with these menus open; it's just disorienting.)
    • A similar problem can crop up because enemies have "clickboxes" larger than they are. If you click on the empty space near an enemy, the game will assume you're trying to attack it, and respond accordingly. Combine this with very large bosses, who spawn cages around you whose bars are individually destructible, and finding a spot the game considers "unoccupied" can involve a Pixel Hunt. You can use the "move" key (` by default) to move without attacking though.
  • Floating Limbs: More of a result of oversight than anything. Specific breastplates of Engineer-only armor can make their elbows and part of their neck disappear.
  • Fallen Hero: Applies to an important character from the original - The Alchemist has become corrupted by Ordrak. It also comes with...
    • Evil Costume Switch: As he ditched his mage robes in favor of a demonic-looking Powered Armor. According to his journals, the armor's purpose is to prevent Ordrak's heart from accelerating his Ember Blight.
    • The Heavy
    • Hero Killer: He kills Syl and heavily wounds the Destroyer in the game's prologue.
    • Towards the end of the game, the Guardian of Mana reveals that Ordrak, Big Bad of the original game, was once a Guardian himself.
  • Final Boss Preview: The Netherim that was possessing the Grand Regent at the end of act 1 turns out to be the Nether King.
  • Find the Cure: With a rather dark twist... The Alchemist's plot revolves around his obsession with curing his Ember Blight.
  • Finger Gun: Ezrek Khan uses these to fire beams and fireballs at you during his boss fight. Considering he's a genie, it's not out of character.
  • Flunky Boss: Almost every single boss in the game either spawns minions or fights alongside them.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: The sheer length of the changelogs for each patch really demonstrates both the difficulties that Runic face due to their determination to keep the team small and their utter dedication to making the game better but there are still some nasty issues to settle:
    • Steam compatibility problems consistently throw wrenches into the community's multiplayer expectations. Desyncs, sudden unexplained deaths and the dreaded save game rollbacks continue to crop up every now and then despite the devs' best efforts.
    • Sudden random deaths have also been occurring in the non-Steam version as well, which has caused no end of pain for several Hardcore players.
  • Game Mod: Like its predecessor, it has dozens and dozens of 'em. With the added benefit of Steam Workshop and a menu at the start letting you easily select which ones you want. Playing the game in mod mode even generates separate character saves, leaving those in your vanilla game untouched.
  • Godiva Hair: Tinya, the Potions vendor in the first town.
  • Goggles Do Nothing: A couple of possible skins for the Engineer include purely cosmetic goggles.
    • The Ferret pet returns from the first game and has the same goggles-clad aviator helmet as before.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: Three of the unique claws (the Bugstomper, Jade Goblet and Old Empire Slicer) resemble giant, green fists. De-equipping a character's weapons results in male characters assuming a fists-up combat stance with females having a more martial form... Except attacks do nothing more than fumbled Scratch Damage.
  • Guns Akimbo: Not only something you can do, the name of an Outlander skill that makes it more effective.
  • Guys Smash, Girls Shoot: Gender has no effect on gameplay but most official art depicts Berserkers and Engineers as male with the Outlanders and Embermages being female.
  • Hard Levels, Easy Bosses: Ranged classes may experience this. Without the risk of running into the middle of an enemy pack and getting shredded they are free to kite the relatively slow and massive bosses around until they drop. Splash Damage skills make things even easier by removing summoned Mooks.
  • Having a Blast: The Embermage's "Infernal Collapse" spell causes a localized explosion at an area of choice, dealing heavy damage and knockback to all mooks within the blast.
  • Homing Projectile: Several enemy spells in the game will chase you down, forcing the player to either move often to avoid them, or simply just tank them. Of course many player skills and abilities fire homing projectiles of their own.
  • Hulk Speak: The Berserker has a downgraded version of this. Either implying their Dumb Muscle status or it's the dialect of the Valgang tribes that are like this.
  • Internal Homage: A well-hidden one that requires jumping through a lot of hoops. You can reassemble Trill-Bot 4000 (sans legs) from Torchlight and he sends you on a quest to fight the Three Sisters, a trio of bosses the original Heroes fought. Like Trill-Bot, the destruction of Torchlight has left them in pretty bad shape.
  • Killer Robot: Several of the Dwarven Constructs are these, most notable The Ancient War Titan who even can drop "The Eye of the Killbot" when beaten, it's respective boss theme in the official soundtracks is called "Killbot" and the achievement for defeating it also refers to it as Killbot. ("Killbot... Killed")
  • Land Mine Goes Click: The Sundered Battlefield has land mines that explode in a very painful explosion. One can prematurely trigger them via long-range attacks.
  • Lightning Bruiser: For some reason a number of Giant Mooks have faster run speed than their smaller comrades in defiance of the Square/Cube Law, plus a nasty Dash Attack that reflects projectiles.
  • Limit Break: Both the Berserker's and Embermage's charge meters work like this when filled. The Embermage enters a state of pure concentration for twelve seconds, skills cost no mana and they deal increased elemental damage. While the Berserker enters a frenzy state for the next six seconds after striking the next enemy with increased movement speed, attack speed, physical damage and critical hit chance.
  • Loot Drama: Invoked and averted. In multiplayer, all drops are instanced, and you won't even see what your allies get, much less be able to nick it. The loading screen hints make it clear that everything that drops is yours, because everyone else gets their own loot that only they can see and only they can loot.
  • Lovecraftian Superpower: A lot of the Nether beings use this, but special mention go to the Nether-infected Estherians. Among the attacks they have are spawning nether slugs that grow into Netherlings from corpses, using tentacles to lash out at opponents, and most disgustingly, shooting out a giant pulsating boil from their back that acts as a toxic timed bomb.
  • Luckily My Shield Will Protect Me: A number of mobs have shields or other types of armor (armadillos, for example) which make them basically immune to damage... at least until you smash their shields with a special attack or a crit. Engineers benefit the best using shields defensively and offensively as well due to their Sword and Board passive converting a portion of a shield's physical defense into physical damage their weapon deals.
  • Ludicrous Gibs: Just like its predecessor (except there's chunks this time around), when the death blow is a bit excessive your enemies will be splattered. There's even a few Embermage lightning skills that always do this on a kill and a specific Berserker skill, Rupture, causes an enemy to explode after a short delay, damaging other nearby enemies. Gibbing enemies is actually a good tactic as Mook Medic enemies cannot revive a gibbed enemy.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: The Engineer's Fusillade skill lets them fire constant bursts of two missiles from their cannon. They get three missiles per burst at Tier I, the missiles have a large explosion at Tier II then they start firing four per burst at Tier III.
  • The Magic Goes Away: The Alchemist has the destruction of the world's ember as one of his plans, thinking it might cure him of the ember blight. He seems to have overlooked the existence of entire races based on or subsisting on Ember, which would be wiped out if his plan succeeds. Thankfully for all concerned the trope is averted in the end.
  • Magikarp Power: Some skills can start off pretty underwhelming at rank one but thanks to the fact they evolve via the tier system and the damage increases by player level, weapon DPS and attributes, they become a lot more powerful later on. For example, the Outlander's Shattering Glaive starts off rather weak for the level it's unlocked at but once it hits Tier 3, it's effectively a One-Hit Kill against many common enemies and shreds the HP of most Champion/Boss monsters.
  • Magitek: Lots, all powered by ember, including:
    • The Engineer wears a Powered Armor suit (though it doesn't cover his entire body) and can build robots
    • The Embercraft is a vehicle the size of a small house, on tank treads. In-game Flavor Text says the original Embercraft design was a train that rode on rails, but the modern one moves freely. The train reference is actually a Shout-Out to the initial concept of gameworld design which featured railways prominently as a symbol of the expanding influence of technological civilization.
    • The Zeraphi and Ezrohir are immortal spirits encased in Powered Armor, a result of their having achieved The Singularity several centuries prior.
    • The Clockwork Core appears to be some form of Magitek as well, but no explanation is given as to what exactly it is or how it works. It is a Precursor artifact that powers the entire world, which likely implies that the entire planet is artificial.
  • The Man Behind the Man: The ending suggests that at least some of the Alchemist's actions may have been due to the Nether King's manipulations.
  • MacGuffin: Several in sidequests. Ordrak's Heart ends up becoming one at the end when it is used restore the Clockwork Core and the barrier it provides against the Nether.
  • Mechanical Lifeforms: The Zeraphi and the Ezrohir, which are two races not seen on the previous game.
    • However, the death animations of the Ezrohir make them seem more like Animated Armor. This could be due to their Ember-induced degeneration.
  • The Medic: One of the Engineer's summons is a tiny robot that periodically heals your party. Further upgrades let it regenerate your mana faster and grant an armor boost to your allies.
  • Mercy Kill: You do this to the Estherian Grand Regent at the end of Act 1. The mission where you fight him is even called "A Mission of Mercy".
  • Metal Slime: Alongside the Phase Beasts from the original, Bittersprites have been added, who drop keys to the golden chests.
    • Golden Crabs can only be summoned by "Monster Shrines," and will burrow and escape if you somehow fail to kill them quickly enough.
  • More Dakka: The Outlander's Rapid Fire skill shoots a constant barrage of initially weaker projectiles from whatever ranged weapon he or she happens to be using. One tier bonus ups the bullet count further.
    • The Engineer also has a robot equipped with a machine gun that fires 5 rounds per second. The tier three upgrade lets it fire three bullets at a time, for some added crowd control.
  • Mushroom Man: Act III has a forest full of hostile living mushrooms, with the brutes and bosses being gigantic.
  • New Game+: It is even labeled like that.
  • No Fair Cheating: If one enters a cheat into the game, the game will flag the current character as a "cheater" and an "!" will appear on their portrait during multiplayer.
  • Non-Indicative Name: The Engineer is actually The Big Guy of the game, but the name has confused many people.
  • Obstructive Foreground: Subverted. Enemies gain a red "outline" and a blue outline for players, pets, items, breakables, switches, chests and even mimics to show their position when they're obstructed by the foreground, but not always.
  • One-Winged Angel: The Nether King starts the fight out as a half-incorporeal Netherim, but after defeating him once, he morphs into a giant Netherim with golden armor and a BFS.
  • Our Werewolves Are Different: Several werewolves appear in the Blightbogs as well as the abandoned Sawmill. The good news is that they don't turn people, the bad news is that they're fast, somewhat durable, hit hard, and appear in packs, sometimes even in an ambush.
  • Pet the Dog: According to his journals that you find in an Act 1 sidequest, the Alchemist, even after being driven half mad by his Ember Blight, has no intention of actually killing the Guardians, and is in fact siphoning energy from all of them rather than some specifically to avoid doing this. The same journal that reveals this also suggests he fully intends to face judgment for his crimes once he's destroyed the world's Ember. Unfortunately, the Estherians and other magical beings have an obvious problem with that last part...
  • Playing with Fire: Used both by the Embermage in their Inferno skills and by the Engineer in their Blitz skills. Some of the Outlander's skills involve fire to some extent such as Flaming Glaives or Burning Leap.
  • Poisonous Person: The Outlander utilizes poison in many of their skills such as Cursed Daggers and Venomous Hail. Their Master of the Elements passive increases the damage of all four elements but poison in particular gets double the value of what any of the other three elements get.
  • Powered Armor: The Engineer is implied to reinforce his armor with a powered exoskeleton the power source of which is located in his backpack. Description of various melee engineer abilities explicitly say they are dependent on the armor's machinery.
    • In addition, many armor sets of Zeraphi or Dwarven design are clearly mechanical in appearance, bearing power sources, vents, and, in one case, a steam furnace.
    • The Ezrohir are the Magitek Animated Armor version of this.
  • Previous Player-Character Cameo: The player characters of the first game show up as questgivers here. One of them has a rather different role.
  • Purely Aesthetic Gender: Classes are not gender-locked and NPCs avoid addressing gender by never mentioning the player characters in third person.
  • Ragnarok-Proofing: All of the dwarves' machinery, be it a trap, a Killer Robot or an entire factory, is still working relatively fine, while the dwarves themselves have been extinct for centuries. Note that being extinct doesn't stop them from getting in your way.
  • Random Effect Spell: The "Wand Chaos" Embermage Passive ability, making both regular attacks as well as certain spells that run off Weapon Damage (Magma Spear, Magma Mace, Icy Blast and Shock Bolts) have a chance of causing "bizarre, random elemental disturbances", as long as the player wields a wand. Effects can include a geyser, a bat that attacks enemies, a Meteor that hits a huge area, a purple vortex, etc.
  • Recurring Boss: The Manticore first fought in the Stygian Aerie appears again as the boss of the Luminous Arena. Thankfully, it cannot summon mooks or its mate to assist it, so it's actually less dangerous than the first time.
  • Rogue Protagonist: It turns out the Alchemist was not cured of his Ember Corruption like the Destroyer and Vanquisher were, and has become The Heavy as a result of it.
  • Rush Boss: The Grizzled Alpha. He and his Corpsefire Werewolf mooks aren't that durable and go down quickly, but all of them are fast and have very painful melee attacks.
  • Saharan Shipwreck: There is a whole area full of shipwrecks in the second part (set in a sand desert) of the game.
  • Schmuck Bait: The Sweet-Aide that Cacklespit can give you as a reward for your quest. Drinking it causes you to take a MASSIVE amount of damage over time... for 13 and a half minutes. Naturally, you'll die if you drink it unless your health regen is top-notch. Alternatively, you can have your pet drink it and you get to watch them run around for that time as their health is constantly empty.
  • Sequel Escalation: Aside from now featuring multiplayer, Runic Games has increased the game's variety compared to the first Torchlight, including an increased number of dungeons, monsters, bosses and so forth. The developers even released an infographic of how much content there is compared to the first.
  • Sequential Boss:
    • Ezrek Khan's fight basically has him summon mooks, and after they're destroyed, he comes in to fight personally. When he's "beaten" the first two times, he retreats and summons mooks again, doing the cycle again. After the third time, he's gone for good.
    • The Alchemist is also fought three times, the first in a normal arena, the second in an arena with flame-trapped floors, and the final time in an arena with even more flame-trapped floors.
    • After The Netherlord is beaten, he goes One-Winged Angel and becomes bigger, faster, and more powerful.
  • Short Range Shotgonne: Shotgonnes (and cannons) have a range that's only slightly longer than melee weapons, but can turn multiple enemies into Ludicrous Gibs with a single blast (and, in the cannon's case, may stun them). Even less explicably, cannons have shorter range than shotgonnes in exchange for a wider spread. As per the trope, however, the shotgun has probably the lowest damage output of any weapon class in the game. Its utility in terms of stuns and blinds is the only real reason for using one, but given Torchlight's emphasis on offensive rather than defensive strategy, you'd be a lot better off just using higher power wands or the glaive skills instead.
    • The Engineer can vastly improve the range of his/her cannon by investing a few points in the Blast Cannon skill. It doesn't build up your Charge Meter and costs some mana, but it fires a big fat projectile that drills through Mooks like, well, a cannonball. Upgrading it causes it to temporarily blind enemies and make them take even more damage from fire and physical attacks.
  • Shield Bash: The very first skill in the Engineer's Aegis tree which stuns enemies and derives damage based on the shield's armor value which increases with each tier. Segments of the charge meter contribute a damage bonus as well.
  • Shock and Awe: The Embermage's Storm skills and the Engineer's Aegis skills are associated with electricity. The Berserker's Tundra skills also contain a couple of electricity based skills.
  • Shoot the Mage First: Magic-using enemies are often a greater threat than the other foes around them, particularly because they can use powerful projectile attacks, spawn other mooks until killed, or even revive fallen mooks back to full health. They also subvert Squishy Wizard, often having more health than other mooks of their kind.
  • Shoot the Medic First:
    • Several Mage-type enemies have the ability to bolster, heal, or even revive their non-mage counterparts, such as Goblin Healers, Roach Mages, Tu'tara Sandreavers, Troglodyte Cerebrites and Varkolyn Warlocks. Naturally, these should be first priority to take out.
    • The Ancient War Titan can sometimes summon a Shield Turret that will make the Titan invincible if it is alive. Obviously, it needs to go down first.
  • Splash Damage: all two-handed weapons provide this, which helps offset the reduced defense or damage output.
  • Starter Villain: General Grell, the Sturmbeorn General. After he's beaten halfway through Act 1, his Sturmbeorn aren't seen after that, and he also isn't allied with the Alchemist, only taking advantage of the chaos he caused.
  • Stripperiffic: Avoided for the most part. As a related video once stated:
    "Torchlight II: Now with 100% more pants!"
    • Still bafflingly used in some instances. For instance, some pants on female models show up as short shorts, but the default model has full length pants. This can result in situations where putting on pants makes your character show more skin.
    • Also played completely straight with the General Goods vendor in the Estherian Enclave, who is wearing nothing but a pair of pants and Godiva Hair.
  • Summon Magic: The Engineer can summon a few attack and support robots to help, the Outlander has some shadowy constructs that can join him/her in battle, the Berserker can call upon a pack of short-lived kamikaze wolven spirits to strike the enemies, and one of the high-end spells of the Embermage allows him/her to create an astral duplicate that attacks with powerful spells.
  • Sword and Gun: It's possible, you don't have the ability to execute but the attack becomes context sensitive where you'll swing if the target's close enough and shoot if it's too far for that. The same can be done for a wand and sword, in-fact the Wooden Sword gives you a ranged, wand and staff damage bonus to encourage it.
  • This Is a Drill: Some of the unique claws are small, hand-covering drills that even spin when equipped.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Vale, the Vanquisher from the first game, goes from a "mere" city guard to the Commander of her own private army, and now wields a BFG rather then the pistol she had in the first game.
    • The Varkolyn. In the first game they were cannon fodder early-game mooks, in the sequel they're now late-game enemies with more deadly variants.
  • Tragic Monster: The Estherian Grand Regent in Act I.
  • Treacherous Quest Giver: Two examples: The Faceless King in Act II, and Cacklespit in Act III. You can take revenge on them though.
  • Überwald: The third part of the game is set in Grunnheim. The area bears a blatant German-sounding name and mostly consists in a thick swampy rainy forest full of monsters including undeads and werewolves. Its also features a haunted graveyard and a Bonus Dungeon inside a kind of gothic tower.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: Ancient dwarven ruins suspended in metallic stilts over an enormous pool of magma, swarming with their undead makers and their mechanical defenders and leading down into the very core of the earth, which keeps the Netherim legions off the material plane? Can't get much more final than that.
  • Warm-Up Boss: The Fallen Guardian in the Corrupted Crypt. Although he does do a good amount of damage, his movement and attacks are very slow and easy to see coming. He's also one of the few bosses who doesn't get a Boss Warning Siren.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: The Alchemist seeks to not only cure his own Ember Blight, but end the threat of Ember forever... but he is more than willing to kill anyone who opposes him, spread an Anti-Magic plague, and unleash hordes of monsters throughout the world to accomplish this.
  • With Great Power Comes Great Insanity: Unfortunately for everyone, it turns out the Alchemist was right about the Ember's side-effects.
  • Wolverine Claws: Claws can't hit multiple enemies in a single attack but they're fast and they deal damage based on half of the enemy's physical armor. Berserkers are well at home with these weapons.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/TorchlightII