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Weaponized Teleportation
This is when any device or process (technological or magic) with the effect of teleportation is used as a weapon against a target, either offensively or defensively, usually in a combat situation, or functions like a weapon in order to deploy a teleportation device for escape or another tactical advantage.

Defensive use: usually deposits the target elsewhere, incapacitating them by virtue of the target's being unable to participate in combat with the user.

Offensive use: teleports a victim into the vacuum of space, inside solid rock, a fire, underwater, or any other hostile environment where death is certain. Or simply beaming them out and never bothering to reassemble their molecules, effectively vaporizing the target.

Teleport Interdiction is a good defense against this.

Sub-Trope of Teleporters and Transporters. Tele-Frag, which, if used on purpose rather than accidentally, is a Sub-Trope of this. Supertrope of Teleport Gun. Appropriate examples should go to subtrope pages.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 
  • In Dragon Ball Z, Goku manages to make good use of this trope during the Cell Games combining his Instant Transmission with his ever-famous Kamehameha for a surprise and devastating attack against Cell which would have killed anyone else, but this being Cell...
  • In the Lyrical Nanoha franchise, Yuuno has displayed the ability to teleport living beings against their will (no other character is so far capable of it). In Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha A's, he, Arf, and Shamal use that ability to teleport the Final Boss of the season into outer space (where it is finished off by a starship bombardment).
  • In Naruto, Tobi uses it often, offensively and defensively. Kakashi can use a similar technique as well. The similarity is not a coincidence.
    • Minato could use a variation of his Teleport Spam ability to teleport incoming attacks to predesignated locations, which he used to intercept the Kyuubi's bijuudama.
  • A Certain Magical Index has teleporters among its esper powers. Teleporters have also been shown to be extremely dangerous combatants: not only can they dodge just about anything, but they can, say, teleport a needle into your body to cause extreme internal damage, or teleport you into the ground or a wall. Kuroko once disabled an entire armored squad by teleporting needles into their equipment, causing short circuits, malfunctions, and in some cases explosions.
  • Rosario + Vampire has the Dimension Sword, which is basically this trope with dimensions. Two objects cannot exist in the same place in the same dimension at the same time, and anything shifting dimensions has destructive priority over anything else. Now, this can be used in single shifts (putting your hand in another dimension where someone's head is in this dimension before shifting back), or it can be done a hundred times a second (barehanded Absurdly Sharp Blade).

    Comics 
  • X-Men: Any time Nightcrawler used his natural mutant teleportation ability offensively against an enemy in combat.
    • Also applies to Magik (Illyana Rasputin) of the X-Men. In one story, both she and Nightcrawler teleported part of Magus away, severely injuring him.
    • Blink in the crossover that led to the creation of Generation X. She could "blink things apart;" it turned out the nature of this was using unstable portals to Portal Cut things.
  • Done accidentally by Doctor Manhattan in Watchmen, when he teleports a television show's studio audience away and some of them die of shock. He also breaks up a riot this way.
  • PS238: Superpowered bully Charles liked to teleport people he didn't like into the lake.
  • In Irredeemable, the alien Vespan are able to harm the otherwise indestructible Plutonian. How? The Vespan had reverse-engineered teleportation technology from science hero Qubit and weaponized the end product into tight-beam teleport guns that would displace strips of Plutonian's flesh.

    Film 
  • X-Men:
    • X2: X-Men United: Nightcrawler's attack on the White House.
    • X-Men: First Class: Azazel's much deadlier attack on the CIA facility, which included teleporting enemies up high and leaving them to fall.
  • Used in Jumper rather effectively by Griffin against two Templars in Rome. He quickly performs a series of micro-jumps, which, somehow, gives him tons of momentum, allowing him to bowl over two trained soldiers much larger than him.

    Literature 
  • In the story It's a Good Life, (later adapted into an episode of The Twilight Zone) the psionically empowered boy Anthony "sends" people he doesn't like to "the cornfield."
  • Joe Haldeman's novel Mindbridge has a race which uses miniature teleporting field projectors as cutting weapons.
  • In The Wheel of Time, the gateways are known to have deadly sharp edges, and we see people "accidentally" butchered a few times after being in the wrong place at the wrong time.
    • Later, Lews Therin shows Rand how to use these gateways as weapons on the battlefield. It's not just the sharp edges: Shadowspawn, for whatever reason, are killed by passage through a gateway.
    • Finally we have the Asha'man Androl Genhald, who is unable to use almost any other spell besides gateways. He's still one of the most dangerous Asha'man around.
  • Shadow Ops has the Portamancer Oscar Britton learn to integrate his portal-opening abilities with MCMAP. The portals can cut things (open portal, jam something half-way through, close portal, snip) and also enable him to strike from literally anywhere.
  • As one might expect, shows up quite a lot in Star Trek Expanded Universe novels:
    • In Final Frontier, a Romulan mothership is destroyed by the much smaller Enterprise by beaming a bomb into its warp core. This only works because it's not long after the transporter was invented, and the Romulans were unfamiliar with it.
    • In Recovery, a large prototype ship has been developed with very large-scale transporters for evacuation missions. One character suggests they could potentially deal with enemy ships simply by beaming them on board.

     Live Action TV 
  • On Blake's 7, the Liberator crew occasionally used their teleport bracelets to beam unsuspecting villains into space, where they would explode. This was used on Vargas from "Cygnus Alpha" and several other villains-of-the-week.
  • Any time a Transporter on Star Trek was used to beam someone directly into space, or inside a bulkhead, or some other hostile environment, was an offensive example of this trope. Beaming bad guys away without killing them would be the defensive use of this trope.
    • Star Trek: The Original Series: The Mirror Universe Kirk kept an alien device called the Tantalus Field which could make anyone, anywhere (presumably within its scanning range) instantly vanish. In an un-filmed episode of Star Trek: Enterprise, it would have been revealed that the Tantalus Field was actually a kind of interdimensional/temporal transporter, which deposited its victims in isolated penal colonies. This would have allowed for the return of Mirror-Kirk, in a different century of a parallel universe. The Tantalus Field would count as a Teleport Gun if it weren't the size and shape of a TV set (it also didn't require manual targeting like a traditional weapon).
    • Armus, a god-like alien from an early episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, used his psionic teleportation abilities to mess with the Away Team sent to rescue Troi and a Red Shirt from a shuttle crash, for example by teleporting their phasers, tricorders, and Geordi's visor away from them.
    • For Q, being an omnipotent Reality Warper, this was the least of his abilities. He would do it with a snap of his fingers and a bright white light.
    • Star Trek: Voyager once used Tele-Frag to destroy a Borg ship by attacking their shields and beaming a photon torpedo inside. The destruction was an accident, by the way. The goal was to disable the ship and steal its transwarp coil, as those coils have a failsafe feature that fry them in the event of the ship's destruction. The torpedo happened to have been beamed in next to a power conduit.
    • Again in Voyager, a Kazon faction stole transporter technology and used it to beam out into space a few Kazon delegates that refused to bow down.
    • There's also a ballistic rifle specifically developed by Starfleet for situations when phasers aren't an option. It's equipped with a micro-transporter which can put slugs in another room, making for a perfect killing machine (unless there's interference).
    • Vidiians teleport people's organs out of their bodies. They're suffering from The Plague and by this point fighting it by any horrible means necessary has become what the whole society revolves around.
  • Occasionally, the Sliders used their Timer to open up wormholes that sucked in unsuspecting villains. Overlaps to a degree with Teleport Gun, since the Timer was gun-sized, mechanical, and had to be aimed properly at its target for this trick to work.
  • In Babylon 5, forming a jump point (portals to/from hyperspace) in anything but empty space vacuum can cause the destruction of whatever was occupying that location; Minbari cruisers used this tactic as a weapon against Earth battleships during the Earth-Minbari war, by opening jump points in the middle of the enemy fleet. Similar to the above Sliders example, but larger scale and ship-based.
  • Farscape: In an overlap with Weaponized Exhaust, Moya, an otherwise unarmed Living Ship, once used her Starburst capability (basically an interdimensional FTL drive) to ignite the Caesium fuel trail of a malfunctioning Peacekeeper Marauder, resulting in the Marauder's destruction.
    • Moya's child Talyn (a Peacekeeper/Leviathan hybrid gunship) performed a Heroic Sacrifice by engaging starburst inside a Peacekeeper command carrier.
  • Used defensively in the Doctor Who episode "The Parting of the Ways" against the Daleks, by teleporting them to an undisclosed location (likely back to their own ship) to slow down their invasion progress. It didn't help much.
    • Materializing a TARDIS inside a solid object is called performing a "time ram," and it produces a titanic explosion, but unfortunately it's a suicidal maneuver. The Third Doctor threatened to do this to an enemy once, but fortunately he didn't have to follow through.
  • In the Torchwood episode Greeks Bearing Gifts Jack does this to Toshiko's alien lover, Mary by changing the settings of the teleporter she had spent the entire episode (and at a century previous) searching for. Instead of sending her back to her home planet, the device teleported her straight into the sun, presumably killing her instantly. Considering that Mary was a political prisoner marooned on Earth and her ruthlessness about getting the device were all so she could go back home due to the empire that banished her having collapsed, it sort of casts Jack in a not so good light. Then again, considering Mary killed and ate her female lovers for at least a hundred years prior to meeting Tosh and was planning to do the same, Mary isn't exactly innocent either.
  • Done several times in Stargate SG-1. Once, Vala had to think quickly and send the leader of hijackers somewhere, so she sent him to space. The original intention was to beam Carter away from the murderous hijacker, but the transporter wasn't working reliably, so Vala beamed out the hijacker instead. They found out where the hijacker had gone when his body hit the window.
  • Stargate Atlantis:
    • John Shepard suggests the Daedalus crew uses Asgard transporter beams to teleport nukes inside Wraith hiveships. The resident Asgard engineer vehemently objects, as they specifically avoid using transporters in this manner. This works several times, destroying a few hiveships, before the Wraith adapt with a jamming signal.
    • Of course, said Asgard is arguably being hypocritical as, in their first appearance, the Asgard destroy three Goa'uld Ha'taks by taking them apart with transport beams. But in his defense, it was a different individual, facing a different enemy, using the technology as a weapon in a different way.
      • It wasn't that the Asgard had any objection to using transporters in that way. It's that they were reluctant to give Humans the ability to do things like that, as they didn't quite trust us with that much power, yet.
    • It's also suggested that the reason the Wraith were able to adapt the jamming signal so quickly (a matter of minutes) is because they have been exposed to it before. Specifically, a rogue Asgard faction called the Vanir left for the Pegasus Galaxy long ago in order to conduct unethical experiments. It's likely that they'd have no qualms about using transport beams as weapons, which is when the Wraith originally developed the signal.
  • In the 2013 Tomorrow People, the titular group uses their abilities this way. They can't use it to kill, but they can and do use it quite effectively in combat.
  • An episode of Earth: Final Conflict, a human scientist develops teleportation (something even the Taelons haven't been able to achieve, although they do have interdimentional portals that have a similar effect) and uses it to teleport bombs into people and Taelons. In the end, he destroys the teleporter and leaves no plans behind.

    Tabletop RPG 
  • The Dungeons & Dragons spell has a few of these.
    • "Teleport Other", which could send a target object or creature to another location.
    • "Dismissal", which kicks extra-dimensional baddies out of the user's dimension ('porting them back home most of the time, to a random plane 1 out of 5 attempts. Sending a Devil to Heaven is not healthy for either)
    • "Planeshift" which sends the target to another dimension of the caster's choosing.
    • On 4th edition, some powers allow you to teleport an unwilling target a short distance. You may teleport it up, for some falling damage (and a prone target), or teleport it into a lava pool or into any other place that may harm it. The target gets a save, but it's still a fair chance.
  • 3rd Edition GURPS Supers had the Teleport power with the Exoteleport enhancement, allowing the user to teleport other characters.
    • The Supertemps supplement had Apparition, an NPC with this power.
    • 4th Edition GURPS Supers explicitly mentions using Innate Attack (Piercing) with Malediction to represent teleporting away pieces of people.
  • The Upeo Wa Macho of Trinity have this locked down. The Player's Guide includes an example of the Transmassion power (teleporting anything not including yourself through space) called "The Upeo Death Drop" which consists of teleporting an enemy to a location that is as far away as you can see with the naked eye... straight up into the air.
  • Eldar Distort weapons in Warhammer 40k work along similar principles — with the caveat that (like all teleporters and hyperdrives in this setting) they teleport objects directly to hell. The Ork's Shokk Attack Gun can function like this if (when) something goes wrong; it's supposed to teleport grots (space goblins) into enemies, but has a nasty habit of sucking the target and/or user up in a Distort explosion.
  • The Big Eyes, Small Mouth Third Edition book has a sidebar about using the Weapon attribute to weaponize any other attribute whose description doesn't already offer an offensive application, using Teleport as an example. For example, it could disorient the target without causing direct harm — or remove selective parts of the target For Massive Damage.

    Video Games 
  • In Final Fantasy Mystic Quest, you can use the Exit spell in battle to teleport one monster away.
  • In ZanZarah: The Hidden Portal, there is a nasty, nasty spell available only to the Psi fairies, which teleports the target to a random location across the battle arena—including the Bottomless Pits underneath. Possibly an example of Magitek, as the spell was functionally similar to a weapon: you have to aim them at the targets manually and their "magazines" are limited.
  • In Pokémon Mystery Dungeon, the "Warp Seed" item teleports the user to a random location on the current dungeon floor; it can also be thrown at enemies to make them be teleported elsewhere.
  • Tele-fragging in Unreal Tournament: Utilising the Translocator to reappear inside another player.
  • The Red Alert series has the Chronosphere, which can be creatively used to teleport any land vehicles into the sea, or any sea vehicles onto the land, destroying them instantly. Additionally, any infantry it is used on will die instantly as well.
    • Somewhat Nerfed in the third game by having a good number of land- and sea-based units have capability to move both on land and at sea.
  • Subverted in the game Achron, which features teleportation and Time Travel as major elements but where it's impossible to teleport enemy units and any attempts to make your own units teleport into the same space and time will damage or destroy both units, making weaponisation of this technique impractical. There are however two superweapons, one of which teleports anything it affects into another time period and the other, a missile that teleports to avoid incoming fire.
  • In The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, attacking Sheogorath causes him to teleport you several thousand feet above Execution Point, with predictable results. The fall will still kill you even if you've enabled God Mode. If you head to Execution Point on foot you can find the bodies of other people who've displeased Sheogorath, including one who was sentenced to death for growing a beard.
    • Another (more amusing) interpretation is that the player remains in the same place, while Sheogorath teleports and reorientates the entire planet a short distance away, before throwing it at you!
  • Subspace Bombs of Super Smash Bros. Brawl's story mode The Subspace Emissary. They transport the lands they're on into Subspace, but when exploding create a vacuum powerful enough to rip apart people caught the blast area. Too many bombs launched in the same area can result in the land they swallow being disintegrated instead.
  • The Banishment Device from Hexen, a magical artifact which shoots projectiles that teleport enemies to another location on the map.
  • In Heroes of Might and Magic V, the Heart of the Griffin has the power to send demons back to Sheogh. King Nicolai dies when it fails against Agrael because he's actually a Dark Elf. At the end of the main campaign the heroes use the amulet to teleport themselves to Sheogh to rescue Isabel from Kha-beleth. Unfortunately for them, it turns out the amulet can be corrupted to work both ways. In the sequels Biara uses the corrupted amulet to teleport demons from Sheogh to Ashan.
  • This is essentially what the Vanguard's ability Biotic Charge is in Mass Effect 2 and Mass Effect 3. While not technically teleportation, it does transport you almost instantly towards the enemy, ignoring any obstacles in the path and sending the enemies flying on impact.
  • The ability Flicker Strike in Path of Exile teleports the caster a short distance to an enemy to deliver a preemptive strike. There is also the Lightning Warp spell, which creates a burst of lightning around both the start and destination points.
  • Several League of Legends characters utilize teleportation with a wide variety of damaging effects, ranging from simple area of effect damage to creating a homing missile that hits nearby enemies to preventing enemies from using abilities, and more.
  • FTL: Faster Than Light has two offensive versions: The Crew Teleporters allow you to send assault teams to attack the enemy's crew and systems, and there's a class of weapons that allow you to teleport bombs directly onto enemy ships, bypassing (most) shields and defense drones, or even onto your own ship to hit boarders. Unfortunately, you cannot use this to teleport enemy crews off your ship or theirs.
  • E.Ψ.Ǝ.: Divine Cybermancy's "Dragon" psychic ability allows players to instantly teleport inside a targeted enemy (or ally), which causes the target to instantly explode into a shower of blood.
  • In the X-Universe series, space stations will be instantly assembled by your large transporter ships exactly where you order, regardless of distance. Cheap space stations are sometimes used by players as weapons - by building the station inside enemy capital ships. Additionally, the Jump Gates connecting sectors both send and receive ships through the same portal (like a stargate); entire squadrons of ships can be instantly destroyed if a capital ship suddenly comes barreling out of the gate, which is a frequent occurrence when the player ignores the flashing warning lights.
  • Sins of a Solar Empire has the Vasari, whose missiles have a chance of bypassing enemy shields by performing rapid micro-jumps using their phase drives.
  • The Portal Wand serves this purpose in Ittle Dew. By laying down a Portal Block and then zapping your target, you can use this to zap enemies or projectiles into harm's way, or even teleport yourself (with a proper Attack Reflector, of course) out of harm's way.
  • The Displacer from Half-Life: Opposing Force is usable both as a weapon and as a personal teleporter. Think the Portal Gun as made by Black Mesa.
  • In MechWarrior Living Legends, it's possible to telefrag battlearmor players with the use of a Good Bad Bug. When a battlearmor throws away his weapon, it spawns about half a meter in front of him, then is flung by the CryEngine physics. Throwing your weapon at another battlearmor about half a meter away will result in your weapon spawning inside him, instantly causing him to explode in a shower of gibs, though when killed his weapon will be "thrown", possibly inside of you.

    Webcomics 
  • In Schlock Mercenary, the Teraport starts out as an experimental FTL drive, it's later realized that it can also be used as a teleporter to quickly move infantry around, and eventually, there comes the Terapedo, a torpedo that teraports itself inside an enemy ship.
  • In The Order of the Stick, Zz'dtri planeshifts Vaarsuviusnote  when he's losing a fight.

    Web Original 
  • In Worm, a group of Indian supervillains called the Thanda specialize in this. Their leader, Phir Sē, can create portals forwards or backwards in time, and uses this to create an infinite loop that yields effectively unlimited energy, which he can then direct wherever he wants all at once. Another member can displace parts of other people's bodies when his teleports intersect with their position, and a third shifts landmasses into orbit so that they fall on his targets.

    Western Animation 
  • In Conan The Adventurer, the Bloodless Carnage is justified by the heroes' star-metal weapons being able to teleport the Serpentmen back to their master Set who is sealed in another dimension. This works against the heroes in the end when Set is freed and on Earth — sending the Serpentmen to Set only takes them out of the fight for a little while since they are at most a few miles away.
  • In Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003), this trope is why both the Federation and the Triceraton Republic want Professor Honeycutt's newly designed Teleportal, which, the show makes clear, could be used to destroy planets with no one being the wiser.
  • Transformers Prime: One of Soundwave's favorite tricks. Since he's directly connected to the Decepticon systems, he can summon a portal anywhere he wants, that goes anywhere he wants, with great speed and accuracy. Autobots attack and find themselves stepping right into a spacebridge that beams them right off of the ship. (Limited range prevents sending anyone into the sun, or even to a height that's unsurvivable by bots.) This is turned against him during the Grand Finale when Jack, Miko, and Raf trap him in between two portals, the influx of which sends him to the Shadowzone.
  • In Wakfu, no less than three named characters can teleport and all three use it liberally in combat. Yugo puts his portals to good use to evade and counter enemy attacks and later learns how to fire wakfu beams through the portals. Season one Big Bad Nox can teleport thanks to the Eliacube amplifying his natural Xelor magic. Season two Big Bad Qilby the Traitor is the biggest example in the series because he's an Eliatrope like Yugo who possesses greater mastery of their shared powers due to adulthood (he can create many portals at once while Yugo can only make two at a time). He also merged with the Eliacube, turning it into a wakfu arm that also amplifies his powers. The series does a good job showing just how intense battles between teleporters can get.

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