YMMV / Teen Titans

YMMVs for the animated series:

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     A - B 
  • Adaptation Displacement: For many younger watchers (or those who just don't read comics). Among the main cast, most people would probably only recognize Robin as a popular comic character.
  • Adaptation Distillation: Adapts and distills many elements from the Wolfman and Perez age of the comics along with some elements from both before and after that period.
    • The show itself has done this as it became the first place many people came into contact with the titans, sans Robin, and as such the show has influenced new comic and show versions of the titans more than anywhere else.
  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Terra. Some fans see her as a wonderful person who is constantly misunderstood and persecuted (often times they are also Beast Boy/Terra shippers), or as a horrible bitch who betrayed the Titans and deserved what she got at the end of Season 2. (usually Beast Boy/Raven shippers.) Few people realize what she was actually meant to be: a Broken Bird and Anti-Villain with complicated motives and very deep emotional issues. So she's a normal 15-year-old girl. Albeit one with geokinetic powers.
    • Val-Yor from the episode, Troq was seen smiling as he left earth. Was he smiling that he's leaving a planet full of Tamaranean sympathizers who called him out for his Fantastic Racism? Or was he really, deep down, thankful that Starfire saved him and is slowly changing his views?
  • Angst? What Angst?: It's revealed in the tie-in comic that Starfire's parents died after she was sent away as a slave by Blackfire to the Gordanians. This isn't brought up at all in the episode she returned to Tamaran. Granted, the comic came out after the episode aired, but watching it again, it becomes particularly jarring considering that Starfire displays no form of grief. Blackfire's lack of grief is justified. Fanon for this seems to be either that Starfire's parents were so distant that she never really knew them (which given that they were royals and what we know of their culture, might make sense) or that they sold her into slavery in the first place (with or without Blackfire's prodding). There is also some consensus that she considers her Parental Substitute seen in the fake wedding episode and his wife (if he has one) to be her true parents.
  • Ass Pull:
    • Cyborg gaining regenerating powers and invulnerability by hacking Brother Blood in the season 3 finale come out of nowhere as a kind of Deus ex Machina, and are subsequently Handwaved as being "a one-time deal".
    • In "Birthmark" Raven says that Robin knows her better than anyone. While the two have similar personalities, Robin was actually the Titan Raven had the least interaction with up to that point. Anytime the two spoke it tended to be a brief interaction, while Raven had several episodes devoted to her relationships with the other Titans. The relationship between the pair played a big role in the season 4 arc, but the writers treated it as something that had already been established, which wasn't the case.
      • This might, might at best being key word here, be allusion to the events of Haunted wherein she briefly mind-melded with Robin and got a glimpse of his past with the implication being that during this, Robin got to see her past as well. The set up however isn't exactly well executed since that after that sequence they still shared very little meaningful screen time; and comes off like an Ass Pull anyway as a result.
  • Base Breaker: Terra, chiefly due to the Misaimed Fandom and misaimed dislike of her character.
  • Broken Base:
    • The show has drawn some flak for its frequent, yet not constant, less-than-serious tone, its Animesque art style/moments, the and the many differences between the heroes in the comics and their cartoon incarnations (like animated Raven's exaggerated Gothiness, and animated Starfire being less aggressive and more naive than in the comics). In addition, the physical appearance of the characters in the animated series is profoundly different than that of the original comic book series which, despite its title, depicted the Titans as being in their 20s (at one point the comic series even dropped the Teen from the title as it had become apparent they weren't anymore), with Starfire and Raven being arguably the two characters most noticably "kiddified" for the animated series. Of course, taking a left on the Sliding Scale of Silliness Versus Seriousness might have gotten the show more fans than it lost, and consequently, it also has a fairly large and devoted fan base. Though that would be ironic given the huge hatedom Teen Titans Go! has gotten for going full on into the comedy zone.
    • Season 5 as a whole tends to be Love It or Hate It with the fandom as some loved the focus on new characters while others hated it and felt the series should have concluded with Season 4. The Series Finale, "Things Change" is especially a sore point among the fandom.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: Slade's entire appearance in "Forces of Nature", where he not only creates a giant fire monster for no reason other than pure destruction (though this was primarily to divert the other four Titans while he could face Robin one-on-one for the first time), but displays several magical abilities that he never uses again.
  • Bizarro Episode: At least once per season. Mad Mod's two episodes in Seasons 1 and 3 fall into this, as do "Fractured" in Season 2, "Bunny Raven" in Season 3, "Don't Touch That Dial" and "Mother Mae-Eye" in Season 4, and "Revved Up" in Season 5.

     C - D 
  • Complete Monster: Slade, one of the Big Bads, was a cold, manipulative criminal mastermind. Slade's main goal throughout the series was to find himself an apprentice whom he could mold into being just as cruel and ruthless as he was. First targeting Robin, Slade came up with various schemes to test the Boy Wonder's mettle before finally infecting Robin's friends with nanobots that would destroy them from the inside out should Robin not follow Slade's every command. When his plans for Robin were thwarted, Slade next turned his attention to Terra. Taking advantage of her status as an outsider who would never be accepted because of her destructive powers, Slade manipulated her into joining and befriending the Titans, betraying them and finally trying to kill them. After Terra finds herself in over her head while fighting the Titans and retreats, Slade physically abuses her for defying his orders. When Terra tries to quit her apprenticeship, Slade reveals that the suit he gave her to enhance her powers also gave him complete control over her body and vowed that he would never let her go. Though Slade dies when Terra rebels against him, he is eventually resurrected by the demonic Omnicidal Maniac, Trigon, to act as the demon's dragon. Slade took a vicious pleasure in his work towards the ensuring the apocalypse, mind raping Raven with visions of her destiny as the Anti Christ and selling out all of humanity to Trigon in exchange for Trigon giving him back his soul. Even when Slade rebels against Trigon, it isn't out of altruism, but because Trigon refused to honor their bargain.
  • Counterpart Comparison: Some have noticed that Slade is closer to Ra's Al Ghul than he is Deathstroke. He's a terrorist instead of a mercenary, he tries to get somebody in the Bat Family to be his successor, and he uses supernatural means to cheat death.
  • Crack Pairing: In-universe, we have the Official Couple of Kid Flash/Jinx. While both characters are adapted from the comics, their ship isn't, and it's extremely unlikely to ever happen there, whether the Kid Flash is Wally or Bart.
  • Creepy Awesome: Raven and Slade. Raven gets less creepy as the show goes on, Slade gets more creepy as the show goes on.
  • Critical Dissonance: Season 5 was one of the most, if not the most well received season among critics and fans of the comics, who felt it's tighter continuity, new characters such as Kid Flash, and often serious tone made it as good, if not better, than the previous season. Among fans of the show, it's probably the most polarizing season.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • It's not uncommon to find Teen Titans crossover pairings, especially ones with Raven. Some the most popular Teen Titans crossovers are Terra×Ben 10, Raven×Danny Phantom, Raven×Zuko, Raven×Ben 10, Megara×Speedy.
      • The Ben 10 and Raven ones are especially strange when you consider that the original, young Ben was also voiced by Tara Strong, the voice of Raven.
      • Considering the Relationship Writing Fumble on the latter series, Terra and Ben 10 is also kinda weird, since Gwen in Ben 10: Alien Force was voiced by Ashley Johnson, who voiced Terra.
    • Raven×Naruto pairings are pretty common.
  • Crowning Music of Awesome:
    • Mumbo's "Master of Your Fate". It's also an Ear Worm.
    • Terra's theme (especially the rendition that plays during her run through the obstacle course) is pretty darn awesome.
    • Everything from the "Aftershock" and "The End" multiparters.
    • Here's one that doubles as a Crowning Moment of Funny: When there's trouble you know what to dooooo... CALL CYBORG! He can shoot a rocket from his shooooe... CAUSE HE'S CYBORG! Nananana, something like that! Doodadoodah, BIG FLUFFY CAT! (That's right!)
    • The climax of the episode Haunted is perfectly spine chilling.
    • Blink and you'll miss it, but when the Titans make a comeback during the big fight in the Grand Finale Titans Together, a badass remix of the main theme song plays, slower-paced and instrumental-only.
    • The song "Raining Down on the Fourth of July Parade" in the episode "Revolution".
  • Die for Our Ship:
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Slade.

     E - F 
  • Ear Worm: There are quite a few songs that count as Ear Worms.
    • The main theme. Sung by Puffy AmiYumi no less! Some episodes have the Japanese version played during the intro.
    • How abour Larry's version of the theme song from "Fractured"?
    • Mumbo's "Master of Your Fate".
    • Puffy AmiYumi's "K2G" from "Mad Mod".
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Quite a lot, despite their limited appearances.
    • Blackfire has a pretty sizable fanbase, most likely due to her voice, her figure and her outfit.
    • Kid Flash only showed up twice, but he's very well-liked by the fans. Being a suave, witty gentleman might have something to do with it.
    • Red X is especially impressive. We never learn anything of his background; not even his real face. He's a character original to the animated series, and he only appears in two episodes, in only one of which is he a headlining villain.
    • Jinx is incredibly popular, particularly in Lightspeed, so her Heel–Face Turn was met with open arms.
    • Argent. She only appears for a brief amount of time but has a lot of fans.
  • Evil Is Cool: Slade. He's a detestable person, but so awesome at being bad that it gets him a big fanbase.
    • There's also Red-X, although he's more of an Anti-Hero.
    • This series actually managed to turn Killer Moth into a Badass Evil Genius. He creates an army of moths that nearly has him ruling the world, and fights the Teen Titans without the need of any effort. Even his costume is cool.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Jinx, Rouge, and Blackfire. Additionally, some found Terra to be sexy when she turned evil. Even Slade has a reasonably large fangirl following, too! (However, his creators explained that he was meant to be the opposite of sexy)
    • Fangirls can also say for Red-X, even though his face was never shown.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • Some fans choose to ignore Season 5, either entirely or up until the Ambiguous Downer Ending. It's also possible that this was the intention of the writers in the first place and Season 5 is a Post-Script Season. Season 4 is based on the most famous (and re-attempted) arcs from the comics, it is the last season to focus on the core Titans (Season 5 mostly dealt with minor members and B-class heroes and villains), and the Season 4 finale is actually called The End. This is a heavily debated topic amongst the fans.
    • 'Deep Six' is also an episode that gets this.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Beast Boy/Raven, big time. It's the most popular couple on Fan Fiction.net and probably in the whole Fandom. Many fans seem to prefer Robin/Raven to Robin/Starfire, but the latter still has the largest following of the two, coming in second position, after Beast Boy/Raven. The third one is Robin/Raven, as previously deducted. Cyborg/Bumblebee are often paired in Beast Boy/Raven-Robin/Starfire fics, and a small portion of the fanbase prefers Cyborg/Jinx to Official Couple Jinx and Kid Flash.
    • Now it appears one of the voice actors ships Beast Boy and Raven. Though Tara often does nothing but Troll with her Twitter account.
    • Fan shipping even occurs in-universe in the episode For Real. Apparently one fanboy ships Starfire/Beast Boy, while another ships Bumblebee/Aqualad.
  • Fridge Brilliance: When Raven is not actively controlling her powers, they almost immediately become destructive. None of the other characters' powers really behave this way, suggesting that her abilities' default purpose is to obliterate everything in the general vicinity. This makes perfect sense...considering that her father is essentially DC Comics' version of the Devil.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • Robin to Mother Mae-Eye: "You are not my mother."
      • And all of Raven's scenes in that episode. This is the only time she has ever had any parental figure who mothers her at all.
    • Also, the use of Dr. Light in the series, if you know the things he did elsewhere... Also counts as a Continuity Nod Because in Identity Crisis they partially damaged his brain in the process of the mind wipe, making him even weaker than he originally was.
      • Later, Dr. Light appears, and Raven Mind Rapes him.
    Raven: Remember me?
    Dr. Light: [appears terrified] I'd like to go to jail now, please.
    • On the other hand, this may be Fridge Horror, because he may be having subconscious flashbacks to the first time he was Mind Raped. And he remembers the fear and the damage to his mind, but he doesn't know what's going on.
    • But then again, Raven threatening to Mind Rape him in "Birthmark", and the show playing it for laughs, becomes this again in light of Slade Mind Raping her at the end of the episode.

     G - H 
  • Genius Bonus:
    • In "Haunted", when Raven goes through Robin's memories, the very last one is a circus, with two shadows on the wall falling downwards. Should give you a hint as to which Robin he is.
    • Also when 'Larry' shows up he gives his real name. It's backward but when the marquee wraps around behind him we see it front ways.
  • Growing the Beard: For most, during late into the first season with the episode "Masks".
  • Harsher in Hindsight: In "TROQ", Cyborg said he knew what it was like to experience prejudice, since he was a robot. Some fans said this was a cop out when he's also black. But when we see "Go!", the origin episode, he clearly expects to be hated just because he's a cyborg freak, usually hides his identity as one, and is surprised when Beast Boy actually thinks he's cool. And when you consider that most of the robots we see actually are evil, and the fact that racial discrimination isn't as much of a big deal in Modern America as it used to benote , and it actually makes sense.
    • In How Long is Forever? Cyborg says that Starfire's friends "Aren't friends anymore," and the villain of the episode, Warp, says that history cannot be changed, so Starfire's friends would still drift apart. Fast forward to 2014, the way the Titans act in Teen Titans Go! gives off the feeling that they aren't friends in the slightest.
      • And the bleak future for the Titans became worse in comics too with Garth's death in Blackest Night, the transformation of Roy Harper into Arsenal after the loss of his arm and his daughter in Cry For Justice, and broke up between Starfire and Robin. Not to mention both its contemporary run during and after the premiere of the show being either Broken Base or Seasonal Rot.
  • Hell Is That Noise: A heart beating with the villain Kardiak, a giant heart with metal tentacles that eats children.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:

     I - M 
  • Ink-Stain Adaptation:
    • Several things ranging from character design to characterization itself were later implemented into the actual comics, with varying results. Also, if you were to ask someone today about the Teen Titans comic mythos, they're much more likely base it on their knowledge of the show.
      • For some specifics: take Cyborg and Raven. The former's popularity in this show (and a few other factors outside of it) have carried over into the comics and even boosted him all the way up to becoming a founding member of the Justice League come the New 52 launch. The latter a little less so, but after this show portrayals of Raven have skewed much closer to this show than her original comic appearances in terms of combative powers and appearances.
    • This has caused problems with Starfire's reception as a character, as her cartoon self and her comic self are radically different.
  • Iron Woobie: Cyborg and Red Star.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Raven may be snarky towards her teammates, but knowing more about her past....you'll feel sorry or her. Terra too.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Slade by Season 4.
  • Memetic Molester: This version of Slade is commonly seen as an Ephebophile by fans - for both boys and girls. It doesn't help that the dialogue at the climax of "Haunted" comes across as creepily sexual in nature, nor does it help the ending for "Birthmark" is effectively an allegory for rape.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Titans, Go!"
    • "AZARATH METRION ZINTHOS!"
    • "Evil beware, we have waffles."
    • "Don't laugh. You gotta EAT the unicycle."
  • Mentor Ship: Slade/Terra. The guilty pleasure ship of the fandom, owing to several key factors and a big age difference. Considerably rare for something that was canon in the original comics.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Terra falls into both types. She's supposed to be a morally gray character, someone who made horrible mistakes because of the pains of her past, but wasn't pure evil. Instead, she has people vehemently condemning her as a purely evil irredeemable psychopath and equally vehemently worshipping her as a blameless martyr who deserved far better than she got from the other Teen Titans.
    • On a show to show basis, the show itself when its controversial comedic successor is brought into discussion, with detractors of the latter complaining about the lack of continuity, characterization, drama, action, and animation style, in addition to being much more straight up comedic. What they may not realize is that these are very similar to the complaints against this show itself for not existing within the DCAU proper and having a more animesque art style, taking liberties with various characters and their depictions and having a more light-hearted and idealistic tone than the comic series it was based off of. The Terra storyline in particular was toned down in terms of both her role and fate.
  • Moe: Starfire, hot alien babe and considering her age, is very cute! She also has a kind nature and naviety about Earth culture.
  • Mondegreen: Some have read the lyrics to the theme song's lyrics as "Never meant to be laid back delight."
  • Moral Event Horizon: Malchior convinces Raven to break his curse using classic sexual predator technique; preying on her despair and loneliness. And then what Slade does to Terra and Raven throughout seasons two and four respectively is bad enough, but he didn't have to sound like he enjoyed it so much.
    • Blackfire counts for trying to kill her own sister without remorse.
    • The creation of the Plasmus-Cinderblock-Overload chimera Ternion in Aftershock qualifies. Why? Because Plasmus is a person who unwillingly becomes a monster when he's awake.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • Larry's... *ahem* rendition of the Japanese version of the theme song. To be fair, Ami and Yumi's vocals can be heard near the end of it.
    • Gizmo's voice; doesn't help that he's easily the most obnoxious character.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Terra's Leitmotif prior to her Face–Heel Turn.

     N - R 
  • Narm: Trigon is serious but his oft-used symbol looks like an evil number 5.
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • Starfire eating Silky's cocoon and really liking the taste of it, both for the audience and implied In-Universe.
    • Kitten and her boyfriend Fang, whose head is a giant spider, making out. Though it does show that Kitten at least isn't shallow.
  • Never Live It Down: Dr. Light's very first reappearance has him (understandably) still so scared of Raven that her appearing to be on the edge of another demon-mode outburst makes him surrender immediately. Nobody ever remembers that by the next appearance from that, he's gotten over it, to the point that when she attempts to intimidate him into immediate surrender again, he nonchalantly blasts her.
  • Opposites Attract: Most of the fan preferred couples invoke this. Especially Beast Boy/Raven.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: Two prominent examples. Highly unusual in that these were supposed to be platonic relationships, rather than romantic ones.
    • Robin/Raven: As noted above, season 4 made a big deal of the fact that Robin and Raven are supposed to have one of the closest relationships of the team, almost surrogate siblings. Except, in the first three seasons, Robin and Raven almost never interact. The best one can say as evidence towards any closeness is the whole "Raven entering Robin's mind after he goes crazy due to Slade's psycho-dust" incident.
    • Raven/Beast Boy: These two were always supposed to be purely platonic friends - Heterosexual Life-Partners with a male/female duo. Instead, especially in season 3, their interactions came off as almost a Slap-Slap-Kiss type budding romantic relationship, with Raven the tsundere and Beast Boy the Dogged Nice Guy. It's the biggest reason why they're the top Fan-Preferred Couple.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Jinx gets a lot of flak from the fanfic writers for having "betrayed her friends" and turned on the HIVE Five. Never mind the fact that they were villains who repeatedly committed theft and put human lives in danger, that the HIVE Five weren't really her friends (except maybe See-More, the only one who even seems to express sorrow at the possibility of her leaving) and were explicitly depicted as inconsiderate and lacking in any sort of drive or passion...no, to the fans, the mere fact that she was a part of their group and left constitutes a heinous crime deserving of bashing. This is an unusual example of this trope, because it's usually unambiguous heroes like...well...Ron himself that get the Death Eater treatment, not a villainess who performed a Heel–Face Turn.

     S - T 
  • The Scrappy:
  • Ship Mates: Robin/Starfire - Beast Boy/Raven is the most common example. There is also Beast Boy/Terra - Robin/Raven or Robin/Raven - Beast Boy/Starfire, and Robin/Starfire - Beast Boy/Terra also exists, though probably to a lesser extent. Kid Flash/Jinx is very commonly shipped alongside any of these combinations. Cyborg usually gets paired with Bumblebee, though he is occasionally paired with Jinx, creating another (much, much smaller) battle between Cyborg/Jinx and the (far more popular) Kid Flash/Jinx. For a while, Robin/Starfire - Beast Boy/Terra - Cyborg/Raven fics were very common.
  • Ship Sinking: Beast Boy and Terra in the finale.
  • Ship Tease: Robin/Starfire.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Beast Boy/Raven vs. Beast Boy/Terra. Two smaller battles in the fandom, but big enough, are going on between Robin/Starfire vs. Robin/Raven and Beast Boy/Raven vs. Robin/Raven as well. Even exists in-universe, as witnessed in "For Real".
    • Most likely a Take That to the fans, considering the pairings mentioned (BB/Star and Aqualad/Bumblebee) seem designed to go against the established Fan Preferred Couples.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Blackfire/Red X is rather popular, and not only have they never met but both characters only appear in a handful of episodes each.
  • Spiritual Licensee: As noted on the main page, the series has a tone closer to Young Justice than the comic it was based on thanks to it's mix of comedic and dark storylines. It was pitched as a Young Justice series.
  • Squick: Kitten and Fang's kiss in Date With Destiny.
  • Stoic Woobie: It's hard not to feel sympathy for Raven but she keeps to herself.
  • Straw Loser: Beast Boy, who may actually come off worse here than "Go!" (in all areas but attitude). His portrayal is mostly juvenile and/or played for comedy, his jokes can fall flat, and he is the most frequent Worf target.
    • Discussed in one episode, and character development ensures he grows into maturity in the end.
  • Strawman Has a Point: While Beast Boy's jerkish behavior to his teammates in "The Beast Within" is uncalled for, he was right in calling Raven out on how she picks on him and insults him.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Immortus has a very cool character concept — that they did nothing with.
    • Blackfire only appeared in two episodes and we never find out why she's so antagonistic in the first place!
    • Red X, despite his popularity, almost NOTHING about him is revealed, or how he got the suit Robin used.
    • Jericho. He's Slade's son in the comics but it wasn't even alluded to in the cartoon. Although this may have been explored if the show got more seasons.
    • Classic Titans villain Psimon makes a couple cameo appearances in the last few episodes. Anyone familiar with the Teen Titans comics, or the Young Justice TV show, knows that this is WAY too cool and dangerous of a villain to be left to a mere cameo.
    • Kyd Wykkyd was one of the most interesting HIVE students: mute, having a Batman-esque costume and his odd demon like powers that were somewhat similar to Raven's. They did jack all with him.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • On a more basic level, Starfire has a deep backstory, yet she never got a season devoted to her own growth the way the other four did (with Robin and Beast Boy getting two in that they tied in to Raven and Terra's growth respectively), while the most growth we got from Starfire was her relationship with Robin.
    • Another example is Robin and Beast Boy's personal relationship with each other. Throughout the show we see them developing stronger bonds with the other members, but their relationship with each other is neutral at best and tense at worst. There's never an episode where they develop a stronger bond together.
      • Especially since the Doom Patrol episodes give them the perfect common ground. The closest we see of them coming together is when they team up to individually take out Brain and Monsieur Mallah in the penultimate episode of the series.
    • Terra's betrayal. They didn't show us enough of her being with the team. The betrayal happened too quickly. She joins the team, pops up in a cameo the next episode, then betrays them one episode afterward.
      • The creators wanted to show more of Terra as a Titan, but were hampered by a budget that didn't allow for 6 regular Titans (and voice actors) plus the Villian Of The Week for more than 5 episodes. So they did their best by suggesting a longer tenure than what we saw, by showing that mute cameo, plus including a flashback of Terra helping the Titans catch Mumbo in her final episode that season.
    • Slade, in spite of making the most appearances of villain in the show, has very little revealed about who he is or even what his long term goals besides gaining an apprentice and dominating the city. It's especially bad that even he achieved his aim after the fourth season he almost never appears in the fifth so the Brain can take the spot as the Big Bad.
    • Robin's transformation into Nightwing is only alluded to once in the series. Despite his interest in becoming said hero, nothing ever becomes of it.
    • It's never explained why Robin left Batman though while it's implied they had a falling out, in "The Apprentice" two parter Robin shows(albeit indirectly) that he still has a lot of respect for Batman and considers him his father.
  • Toy Ship: Beast Boy and Terra. OK, so they're not kids, but they're still two of the youngest characters in the show.

     U - W 
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Silkie might as well be the mascot.
    • There's also those little egg-headed aliens that worshiped Raven.
    • And Monster!Starfire from the episode Transformation.
    • Blackfire and Glgrdsklechhh's babies in The New Teen Titans.
  • Villain Decay:
    • Brother Blood. Even though his power level actually seemed to go up with each appearance, his personality became increasingly hammy, petulant, and single-mindedly obsessed with Cyborg, which noticeably hurt his overall effectiveness as a villain.
    • Also very observable with the HIVE kids. In their first couple of appearances, they're the Evil Counterpart team to the Titans and can fight them evenly (and beat them without too much trouble if they play their cards right), but as time goes on they become complete jokes to the point that Jinx, who remained the most competent, finally jumped ship and became a hero.
      • This is probably because the first fight, they caught the Titans off guard. The only thing that the HIVE kids are trained to do is repeat the same strategies over and over again, without making any judgment calls or creative plans. As anyone can tell you, this does perfectly fine in an academic setting, but in the real world things DON'T always go as you plan, and then all the strategy in the world won't help. The Titans are capable of innovation and creativity, but HIVE seems to be only capable of "Repeat Pattern Alpha" and just doing that over and over.
      • Then again, the Titans noticeably grow in terms of skill, power and teamwork over the show's run. Jinx seems to be the only member of the HIVE Five interested in something other than using their powers for petty gain once the structure of the HIVE Academy is taken away from them.
    • Slade inverts this. Normally being Demoted to Dragon makes a villain less of a threat, but he actually become more of a threat during this period.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: To an extent. On the whole, the series was pretty kid-friendly overall, but it did have moments of this at times with storylines involving the end of the world, Blackmail when Slade threatens to kill the Teen Titans unless Robin becomes his apprentice, and a few instances of Mind Rape. Not to mention Raven's demonic heritage would make some religious parents and viewers scared.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: Any episode with Mad Mod and Employee of the Month, where the Villain of the Week was a cube of alien tofu that was stealing cows to fuel his starship and wanted to blow up Earth after he had enough cows.
    • And then there's Larry...
      • Having Larry interrupt the theme song tends to be the writers way of pre-lampshading this.
    • Mother Mae-Eye. Enough said.
  • The Woobie: Often Starfire. Beast Boy gets little bits of Woobification throughout the series, but season five really sticks it to the guy, especially when he finds Terra.

YMMVs for the comic books:

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     A - B 
  • Accidental Innuendo:
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Terra. A sociopath who could not be helped, or a broken little girl who got mixed up with the wrong people and let her emotions get the better of her? Did she truly think the Teen Titans were her friends, even a little bit? Did she have feelings for Garfield? Terra 2, and her Black Lantern version, seems to have supported the alternate views. Also, was she hoisted by her own petard by accident, or did she commit suicide with the intention of doing so? Was she evil at heart, or did she just hate the hypocritical "goody two-shoes" nature of the Titans? Was her death fueled by drugs, contaminated drinking water, or was it natural?
    • This is also another instance where the ambiguity only came later. Terra's evilness was the whole point of her character, and the narration during her death says, in no uncertain terms, that no one taught her to hate but herself.
      • Just prior to Final Crisis, there was a one-shot published that seemed to insinuate that Terra's psychotic behavior was the result of being drugged by Deathstroke (ala his kidnapping and brainwashing of Cassandra Cain).
  • Arc Fatigue:
    • Titans Hunt in spades.
    • The Culling in the New 52. The book's first 8 issues (most of a year) were built to get to this crossover with Legion Lost, and at the end they don't even manage to defeat the bad guy.
  • Author's Saving Throw: A few were attempted during the John's era. Some went over better than other.
    • John Bryne's unpopular erasure of the Doom Patrol's past was undone thanks to a battle with Superboy Prime.
    • Resurrecting Jerico with his original, pre Heel–Face Turn personality.
    • Both Rose Wilson and Cassandra Cains bouts of insanity were explained away by Deathstroke drugging them during Johns final arc on the title, with Cassandra restored during it.
    • Cutting down on the number of mentor titans after fans complained and making Robin the leader of the team post One Year Later.
  • Base Breaker: Fandom is split between Cheshire and whether or not she's an assassin who loves her children, or a sociopath who loves them so long as it's useful to her. Word of God from Gail Simone has it that she is indeed the latter due to nuking the entire nation of Qurac, though some fans point to her characterization not handled by Simone as the true Cheshire. Though the Qurac bombing was written in the early 1980s long before Gail Simone ever used her, which essentially means Cheshire has been a monster since then.
    • Raven is considered this in some parts of the fandom. There are fans that see her as a cliched, overused character and irredeemable for the actions she pulled under her father's influence in the '90s (including destroying Tamaran), while others insist that she's still relevant to the series and that Starfire's forgiveness was good enough.
    • Terra's story arc in the early 80s is an extreme example, as she was so popular that the fan perception of her Face–Heel Turn led to death threats against the creative team, who'd intended her to be evil all along.
    • Cassie Sandsmark/Wonder Girl II. Many like her, others outright hate her. There's no middle ground.
    • Bunker from the reboot - some like him, but many others claim that at least he wasn't an asshole like everyone else at the time.
  • Boring Invincible Villain: Harvest in the New 52, particularly during The Culling. Not only does he have a force field, and possess various different powers allowing to No Sell practically everything entire teams of heroes throw at him, but he allegedly plans or at least prepares for every single possibility he encounters. While intimidating on paper, he makes note to point this out so often he seems more like he has no idea what he is doing and desperately trying to save face.

     C - D 
  • Complete Monster: Trigon the Terrible is a demonic overlord who rules an empire where countless souls are kept in horrible bondage, with those who dare to resist—"resistance" can be defined as "don't do as ordered quick enough"—being ruthlessly exterminated. Trigon wishes to extend his dominion to Earth, and to that end, disguised himself as a handsome human being to impregnate a woman named Arella, revealing his true form and taunting her after. After invading earth, Trigon dominates the soul of his daughter Raven and corrupts her into a monster, forcing her to attack her own world and friends. Trigon's brutality extends to exterminating entire worlds simply to make a lesson. With no redeeming features whatsoever, Trigon is the most terrifying and powerful foe the Teen Titans have ever faced.
  • Creator's Pet:
    • Danny Chase was universally loathed by fans within a few issues of his first appearance. He was a Cousin Oliver (he even looked like the original Cousin Oliver) introduced to make the team seem younger, as he was only in his early teens while everyone else was pushing 20. Despite his age, he constantly argued with the other members of the team, criticized them, was supposed to be a genius superspy teenager with telekinetic powers, but then went crazy with fear whenever an actual fight took place. And when Dick was distraught at the death of Jason Todd, Danny said it was no big deal because Jason 'knew the risks'. The only person who didn't seem to grasp how loathed this character was was writer Marv Wolfman who, to this day, still insists it was the readers' fault for not "getting the character",
      • As a tip, in a series about costumed superheroes with codenames, whose fans presumably enjoy reading about costumed superheroes with codenames, having a character who continually goes on about how lame costumes and codenames are and how he's too cool for a costume or codename probably isn't going to go down too well.
      • It also hurt that Marv Wolfman had no idea how to write a telekinetic to complement the Titans' diverse power set. Chase's powers were mainly shown to be (at best) extremely limited: at best he could levitate himself (but only while sitting Indian-style) and throw small objects around at bad guys to annoy them. Jean Grey he wasn't; this combined with his wussy behavior during combat, made him practically useless in battle. As bad as Cypher was power-wise, at least he had training in hand-to-hand combat and was willing to take a bullet for his teammates when necessary.
    • The second Wonder Girl, Cassie Sandsmark, was felt to be this after she became team leader in Teen Titans volume 3. While talked up as a leader by the writers, Cassie didn't really do all that much and more page time was often given to her acting obnoxiously condescending or being a Jerkass to her boyfriend. Fans also felt insulted when Felicia Henderson brought Beast Boy back to the team: Rather than give him his leader role back, Henderson had Cassie continue to be leader while lacking any character development, while the older and more experienced Gar was demoted to obnoxious comic relief and treated as if he were younger.
  • Cry for the Devil: Persuader, when she's finally reunited with her father and he's killed by Clock King right in front of her.
  • Die for Our Ship: Beast Boy (Changeling)/Raven vs. Beast Boy/Terra (or Terra II). Fans of the former hated there being a second Terra so much that they actively wished death on the character (they got their wish). Fans of the latter still clung to the hope that Raven would be deep-sixed for even the third Terra, citing that she would make "more sense", getting them hate from Terra III/Power Girl fans. After both later Terras were written out of continuity, the shipping competition has since been reset to being between the first Terra and Raven.
  • Dork Age: A couple of eras qualify. Particularly the Atom-led new team of H'sann Natall hybrid teenagers. And the 90s up until the teams split into The Titans and Young Justice.
    • Yet even others believe Geoff Johns helped derail the team into a longer-lasting era of poor quality, if not being the main cause. Opinions over this vary a lot more, though Felicia Henderson's part of volume 3 is seldom ever liked.
    • None have been yet so reviled as Deathstroke's team of mercenaries, under Eric Wallace and Fabrizio Fiorentino. Compared to the levels of Wangst and Gorn any previous book may have had, Wallace somehow managed to turn it Up to Eleven.
    • The New 52 Titans have become this recently, having been cancelled two and half years into its run, incidentally also driving the final nail into DC's Young Justice line, which at one point included teen heroes from three different comic universe. A lack of consistent pacing and logic, Executive Meddling, and enough dropped subplots and characters to drive even die-hard fans away.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Deathstroke and the original Terra mostly share this reception. The '80s villain Eric Forrester has also gotten this treatment from a few fans and fanworks, despite the fact that he only wanted the power of Raven's soul-self and didn't really love her, as well as attempting to rape her. His supporters use the in-story reasoning that Eric was trying to save his humanity with his using of women for their souls, while turning him into a misunderstood nice guy that should date Raven.

     E - F 
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Beast Boy, Kid Devil, Miss Martian and Ravager, especially in the 2000s books.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the Batman fandom over Nightwing. A big part of it comes from the shipping wars regarding whether Dick should be with Starfire or Barbara Gordon.
  • Fan Nickname: Femto for New 52 Raven.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: While there are numerous examples, one that stands out in particular is the case regarding Titans #23 by Eddie Berganza, which acted as the final issue before Eric Wallace took over. Primarily a filler issue, it basically rewrote the Fab Five's friendship as a case of Roy being a nuisance they barely put up, while also revealing he had asked Donna to marry him. However, a premonition from Lilith Clay warning Donna that her redheaded husband would die led to Donna turning him down. Also, the Titans apparently knew beforehand about Roy's heroin addiction and once found him strung out in his Speedy costume before Robin told him "get help or get out." This issue blatantly ignored everything about the Fab Five when they were younger and it was clear Eddie Berganza had no idea what he was doing, or most likely it's a case of They Just Didn't Care since they needed to fill the gap before the new direction. Nearly every fan of the Titans and of the Fab Five choose to pretend this story never happened. It was just that bad.
  • Foe Yay: Cheshire with both Roy Harper, the first Speedy, and Thomas Blake, aka Catman. She once propositioned Catman during a battle, not long after having hired two hit squads after him.

     H - I 
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Thia, the evil goddess of the sun, redesigned herself as a powerful businesswoman, as seen in The Origin of Lilith. She had a firm named "Sun publishing Inc.". This firm has absolutely no relation with the Sun Publishing Company, and nobody implies that this later company is led by an evil witch that sets people on fire at a whim.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • The controversial "Titans: Villains For Hire" one-shot has been the subject of a great deal of (mostly negative) attention over its ending, where Ryan Choi, one of DC's few Asian superheroes, is violently slaughtered by the new team of Titans. It has even prompted a number of debates and editorials across the web over DC's handling of non-white superheroes.
    • The removal of all of the minorities from the Teen Titans (including the fan-favorites Static and Blue Beetle) by incoming writer JT Krul has also prompted a sizable amount of discussion on message boards, and was even mentioned by Racialicious.com, a website which deals with racially-charged issues in politics and pop culture.
    • Since volume 3's inception back in 2003, there had been a small but vocal number of fans who have stated their hatred for it, as the cult-classic series Young Justice was cancelled so that its characters could be "graduated" to Titan status. In the reverse, there were also fans who disliked the current book because the Young Justice characters were added and developed at the expense of older established Titans.
    • Rise of Arsenal. Enough said.
    • Bunker has caused some minor fuss. Many critics (gay and straight alike) consider him to be a little too gay, even despite the writer's explanation that Bunker is open about his sexual preference because everybody in his hometown loved and accepted him for who he is.
    • Over the years, fiery debates have come up involving the original Terra: Was she really as sociopathic as Wolfman claimed, or did she deserve to be rehabilitated and redeemed...or at the very least, kept alive? It certainly didn't help that Wolfman agreed to make Terra the sister of Mike Barr's character Geo-Force, with Barr then writing Terra as sincerely loving her brother in her private thoughts at the same time Wolfman was writing her as a sociopath! Retcons by writers like Brad Meltzer (who suggested Terra was innocent) have complicated the matter further, as well as some feeling that Wolfman "played favorites" in creating Terra to be a sociopath but never calling out Raven for more destructive actions she pulled under her father's evil influence. The Terra vs. Raven parts of the debate get particularly loaded.
  • In-Name-Only: The New 52 team gets accusations like this for some of its characters.
    • Wonder Girl had zero connection to Wonder Woman until her father was revealed to be demigod from the Greek pantheon. She's completely unaware of this, though, so there's still no reason why she calls herself Wonder Girl beyond trademark purposes.
    • Solstice received an overhaul that rendered her unrecognizable and left her with vague energy and shadow based powers. This despite being a brand new character.
    • The New 52 version of Tim Drake is probably the most recent and biggest example of this for fans. For instance, his main role in the book is to be the expo speak guy who's a blatant Expy of Nightwing from the classic series, including the latter's Casanova approach towards women and winged costume. He also now has "Tim Drake" as an assumed name after being an idiot and bringing the Penguin's wrath down on his family, he didn't figure out who Batman was, has almost no down-to-earth ties anymore, and largely acts like a stupider, less sensitive parody of his former character. Instead of being a computer genius, his backstory was also tweaked to have him as a former athlete (which some believe furthers the Nightwing similarity, as Dick was an acrobat).
    • And then we learn the origin of Bart Allen a.k.a. "Bar Tor", a villainous and murderous revolutionary from the future with no connection to the Flash Family at all. To say that fans of Impulse were pissed would put it lightly.
  • It Was His Sled: Terra being The Mole, and her general sociopathic nature. That arc is one of the most well-remembered arcs in the comics run, one of the most influential arcs in comic book history, and it helped make the series so popular in the 80s. When a kids comic spoils this in the characters first appearance, you know that its his sled. The cartoon adaptation helped renew this spoiler, thanks to Terra's popularity (though that Terra was vastly different from the original Terra.)

     M - O 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Osiris' killing of the Persuader was an accident. He tried justifying the death of Ryan Choi and everyone else he's killed as trying to bring his sister and Black Adam back. But now he freely admits that he enjoys violence and is just as bad as everyone accused him of being.
    • Superboy-Prime becoming full-on evil again after Headcase accidentally takes him away from Prime Earth. This nullifies any redemption he could have had in Blackest Night and solidifies his Complete Monster status.
  • My Real Daddy: It's widely agreed that Devin Grayson is the only writer in recent years who ever really understood not just Roy's character, but Lian's as well.
    • The creative team of Marv Wolfman and George Perez for the Titans in general. They didn't create the team but they did propel the Titans to the greatest height of their popularity, which was no less than DC's # 1 selling title. And, although they did not create the team itself, they created Raven, Cyborg, Starfire, the Nightwing persona of Dick Grayson, the Troia persona of Donna Troy, Jericho, Deathstroke, H.I.V.E., Terra, Brother Blood, Trigon, Azarath, Cheshire, the "T" shaped building... can you really imagine the group without a number of those characters or concepts being around?
  • Narm: Lian Harper's funeral. The entire superhero community shows up, in their brightly colored costumes.
    • Harvest. It's hard to take a "Darkseid level threat" seriously when his plans are transparently idiotic.
    • The first issue of the New 52 series has Tim holding a picture of him and Bruce swinging through Gotham. It looks cool, until you question how he even got that picture. Seriously, did they pose for it? It outright looks like a comic book cover.
  • Never Live It Down: Roy's heroin abuse, which was only present for one issue of Green Arrow and then followed by him going cold turkey. It doesn't help that following Lian's death he's gone back to using it.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Lord Damyn (High of Highs, Best of Best) is a supporting character who only ever appears in two issues (#24 and #25) of The New Teen Titans. He makes quite an impression, though.
  • Only the Creator Does It Right: An odd case with any Teen Titans team formed with members of the YJ4 (Tim Drake, Bart Allen, Cassie Sandsmark, and Conner Kent): Peter David's Young Justice book did not create any of these characters, but he wrote their initial interactions, chemistry, and helped introduce a huge number of fans to them and comics. Especially Wonder Girl; Cassie was The Scrappy to a large number of people until Peter David made her popular enough to win a fan held election for leader. If you look at the entries on this page for Geoff Johns, you can see part of the problem.

     S - T 
  • The Scrappy:
    • Danny Chase. Not only did he actually look like Cousin Oliver, but everyone hated him. He mocked Jason Todd's death (in front of Dick Grayson, Jason's adopted brother) and his sole Crowning Moment of Anything was his own death.
    • Terry Long, for being considerably older than Donna, coming off as creepy, and his tendency to make blatant passes at her friends. He actually became even more of a Jerk Ass in the '90s, before he was killed off in John Byrne's run of Wonder Woman.
    • The Team Titans:
    • Cassandra Sandsmark, she came off like a raging Alpha Bitch after her boyfriend's death. It's worse when you remember that she started out as her school's lovable geek. Her New 52 version has similar controversy, but is also hated for being a thief, being "overtly sexualized" and having her connection with Wonder Woman only recognizeable to readers of Wondie's book (she's the daughter of Diana's half-brother, i.e. the niece of Wonder Woman, though neither of them know about it as of now).
      • Once Conner returned to the series (before the reboot), you think she wouldn't have had much reason to keep lashing out at her teammates, but some writers felt differently. Under Johns' (ironically) and others' pens since Conner's return, she had been portrayed positively and having gotten over her grief. But other writers, especially in the case of Felicia Henderson, had continued to portray her as an angry shrew, who even goes as far as to treat her back-from-the-dead boyfriend like crap (eventually leading to their breakup).
    • Prysm, a member of Dan Jurgens' volume 2 team, isn't very liked by some classic fans due to coming off too naive and stereotypically feminine, spoiled, and her visual appeal mostly coming from the fact that she was nude all the time.
    • Fringe from the above run is also hated, for lacking personality and never being as developed. Unlike Prysm, it's hard to find fans that can tolerate him.
    • Minion from Wolfman's New Titans is either hated or ignored by most fans due to the fact that he came in during a Dork Age, and that he seemed to be pushed in as a cool new teenage character but lacked interesting traits.
    • Bombshell was widely disliked by a number of fans during her brief tenure on the team. She was criticized for having very little personality and was accused of trying to ape the characterization of the recently departed fan favorite Ravager. The fact that she was a Motor Mouth and a Jerk Ass didn't do much to help her standing with fans.
    • Deathstroke's Titans team qualifies for this status as well. They are even more so ignored than Fringe and Minion, who are at least mentioned in nostalgic regard when discussing the past Titans team, whereas Slade's team of mercenaries is completely ignored save for when someone is mentioning a member that was already a Titan (Roy, Osiris) or associated with the group (Cheshire, Deathstroke). Anything beyond that is liable to be overly critical ranting about how much that run on the book sucked.
    • The DEOrphans, a group of metahuman kids from the DEO, were hated even more than the unpopular Titans. This was because they got in the way of the Titans' screentime and that they were simply useless at fighting or doing much to advance the plot. Their presence also caused the "Epsilon" arc to be heavily rewritten, and a bunch of other planned stories had been thrown out.
    • Pantha and Baby Wildebeest had received hate and ridicule for being "awful '90s characters" from various fans, although their deaths in Infinite Crisis showed them to be more on the Base Breaker side, as many other fans decried their horrible fate.
    • Flamebird. After the first Crisis, the original Bat-Girl no longer existed and Barbara Gordon was deemed to be the original. When Marv Wolfman and George Perez decided to revamp the Titans West team for the Post-Crisis origins of the Teen Titans, Betty Kane was reintroduced as Mary Elizabeth ("Bette") Kane, now with the codename Flamebird and a Valley Girl with a strong desire to get the affections and praise of Nightwing in any way. As Wolfman had no love for the Titans West save for Lilith and Changeling, the portrayals of the revamped versions, ESPECIALLY Bette, earned them spots high on the Titans "Scrappy" list. Flamebird wound up as a Butt Monkey-type character for years to come, even though some writers attempted to make her seem more interesting through "depths" in her origin (stating her physical prowess and skills that rarely seemed to be reflected). Geoff Johns started a more streamlined take on the character in the Beast Boy mini-series, and it seemed that Greg Rucka was attempting to revise her into a much more competent heroine. The New 52 pressed the Reset Button via the Batwoman series, as Bette now lost most of her established history (and previous upgrade), making her come off nearly Too Stupid To Live and get mutilated by an enemy. She's later appeared to have gone back on track to a darker and more serious revamp in her costume, but time will tell if this change is successful.
    • Golden Eagle was initially hated for being a shoe-horned attempt to give Hawkman a sidekick and knockoff in the Pre-Crisis era, and was hated Post-Crisis for being a slacker surfer-type guy who'd only fight if it could get him women and attention. He got a little sympathy after being killed off, but after Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray retconned his death and revealed him to be a Jerkass-type villain with a grudge against Hawkman, fans had new reason to despise the guy (or the direction he was taken in).
    • Tara Markov, Terra of course, isn't exactly a well-liked character. She was the original comic's mole, and a Psycho for Hire who toyed with people's emotions and taunted her former friends.
    • Tara's doppelgänger, previously assumed to be her revived, Terra II, was more liked, although some fans of the Beast Boy/Raven ship threw potshots at her (until her death). Atlee, the third Terra, managed to become something of a fan favorite due to her supporting role in the Power Girl series.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Tim Drake (Robin III) and Cassie Sandsmark (Wonder Girl II). Given the fact that they had a very platonic interaction before the hookup, that Wonder Girl was the girlfriend of Robin's dead best friend Superboy, and the reason they kissed in the first place was due to mutual mourning of said person... yeah, it was definitely a trainwreck. Fans of both Wonder Girl and Robin sighed a collective breath of relief when the pairing ended.
    • ...Though the return of the subplot in the New 52 only reignited the fan rage. To the series credit, the first few issues did establish Unresolved Sexual Tension between the two and succeeding issues suggested that the romance would be approached slowly and with an organic approach. Then issue #18 happened. First, Tim Drake kissed Solstice from out of nowhere, even though he knows she's in a relationship with Kid Flash. Then, on the next page, it's heavily implied he and Wonder Girl have sex, and have had sex before. And the last page reveals that something's very wrong with Tim. Later issues reveal that Trigon was manipulating him, but the writer tried to write the situation under the rug by saying he was only enhancing Tim's desires. Unfortunately, that still meant he took a famously chaste hero like Tim, forced him to have sex under the influence (ie. rape) with his Love Interest, and then to add salt to the wound, Wonder Girl was then shown trying to get with Superboy (probably her most popular suitor) to get past the fling, Solstice promptly forgot the whole event, and everyone was written poorly for seven or eight more issues before they were cancelled.
  • Strawman Has a Point: The evil alternate Kid Flash during The Terror of Trigon pointed that, although they had so much Unresolved Sexual Tension, Wally West is so undecided that he will never enjoy the warm kisses of Raven. And he was right.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Titans becoming a villain-driven book about a team of mercenaries led by Deathstroke. The reviews for the series before the change had already been poor, but after Eric Wallace and Fabrizio Fiorentino took over, the book found its way on many "Worst Comics of 2010" lists. One common complaint was the death of Ryan Choi.

     W 
  • Wangst: A staple since the eighties.
  • We're Still Relevant, Dammit:
    • The outfits from the "Culling" crossover, which basically says "We're still cool. See? Tron costumes!"
    • After the fiasco the comic has been having throughout it's New 52 run DC has decided to "bring them into the digital age." In other words, "Oh look! They're texting, and they have smart phones! How hip and happening is that?!" It feels like an obvious attempt to latch on to what "in" with the teen and young adult crowd. The advertising for it adds a level of Narm that's lacking anything to like about it. The covers themselves are unnaturally jarring due to showing RAVEN of all people acting like a phone addict. The same covers make it look like they're texting each other even though they're standing right next to each other and makes the team look like no such thing.
  • What Do You Meanits Not Political: "The Return of Donna Troy" has a discussion between Troia (a brainwashed evil conqueror at the time) and Athyns. Troia claimed that the aliens she was attacking had some dangerous universal weapon, which must be destroyed on behalf of the universe. Athyns pointed that they were not surrounded by any dangerous evil army but by poor people ravaged by war, and asked if they had such a weapon, why didn't they attempt to defend themselves with it. Athyns concluded, before starting to fight, that there is no such weapon and that the Titans of Myth have lied to her. Yes, you guessed it: the comic book was published at the time of the Iraq war.
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: When Raven first appeared, she could not have her Soul Self out of her body for more than 5 minutes. One day, she failed to return to her body in time. The results were... mind screwing.
  • The Woobie: Kid Devil of the current generation. He has the most pathetic back story prior to joining the team, and ends up getting the worst treatment after.
    • Jerkass Woobie: Yes, Harper murdered a supervillain, turned his back on his friends, went back on heroin, and joined Deathstroke's mercenary team for the chance to kill Deathstroke. But considering that his right arm had been hacked off, was given a prosthetic which actually causes more pain and impairs his abilities as an archer, and his daughter, Lian, died, it's hard not to feel sorry for him. This is magnified by how out-of-character his friends and family acted during Rise of Arsenal, and by how his joining Deathstroke's Titans was mainly due to Cheshire, Lian's mother, guilt tripping him into joining by saying that he "owed" her for Lian's death.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TeenTitans