YMMV / Hey Arnold!


  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Does Arnold coincidentally run into Helga all the time, or...
    • Is Olga genuinely trying to be a good sister to Helga, or is she just a passive-agressive version of Jamie O? Especially after entertaining her class with stories about Helga wetting in the bed...
      • Additionally, the final season episode "Big Sis" almost seems to be made with this alternate interpretation in mind, with Olga making her entrance opening the door right into Helga (though that likely was an accident) and the episode ends with Olga making Helga dress in an embarrassing outfit as she rows Olga and Lila around the lake in a boat. The end also seems to suggest that Helga has given up on Olga ever learning from her recent experiences with Helga and jumps ship (in more ways than one) on their relationship.
      Helga: What was I thinking?
    • Arnold's parents could be seen as Mighty Whitey. Their friend Eduardo does not specify why they are the only ones who can save the village's children. Double points because they consider their mission a great reason for leaving Arnold with his grandparents.
  • Animation Age Ghetto: Very nicely averted, in that it did eventually deal with heavier themes, but ones that young children would still be able to relate to, and it an optimistic (if not sometimes odd) way. Its urban setting is said to be a huge contributing factor.
  • Awesome Music: Pretty much the entire musical soundtrack, courtesy of Jim Lang.
    • In particular, the music tracks at the end of "Arnold's Christmas", "Parents Day" and "Pigeon Man" are all amazing.
    • The iconic theme song also deserves a mention. Later in the series run, they used a newer rendition of the theme song, which, while different, is just as jamming and classic as the original.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Helga Pataki. The majority of the fans love her backstory and complexity. However, there's a Vocal Minority that finds it hard to forgive her cruel actions (particularly in "Girl Trouble", "Love and Cheese", and "Helga and the Nanny") as well as her treatment towards everyone (especially Arnold and Phoebe).
    • Harold. You've got one half of the fanbase that will find him annoying and obnoxious. The other half will see him as the hilarious loveable loser.
    • Rhonda. Some find her to be an annoying Rich Bitch while others like her for her Pet the Dog moments she gives in "Rhonda's Glasses" and "Polishing Rhonda."
    • Stinky is considered entertaining for the same reasons as Harold or is disliked for the same reasons as Sid.
  • Broken Base:
    • The Movie. Many fans genuinely like it and think it's criminally underrated or only considered bad because of Executive Meddling. But many either find it okay, but nothing spectacular or think it sucks/could have been better. Aside from the obvious complaint of being a TV movie put on the big screen, some claim that the more action-oriented nature of the movie clashed with the down-to-earth tone of the show. (The James Bond-like teaser trailer didn't help matters either.) Another common complaint is the lack of focus on secondary characters.
      • Before its release, Nickelodeon invoked this trope. The network ran an ad series for the movie that had kids acting out scenes, and then reacting to them. One ad was the "controversial" scene in which Helga confesses her love to Arnold, and all the kids said that she'd never admit it to him.
    • For some, Arnold's Character Development. Some think it's him showing his maturity and becoming wise beyond his years - while others think he started becoming quite boring since in the later seasons he was never wrong and essentially became the city's advisor.
  • Crazy Awesome:
    • Arnold's Grandma and Grandpa.
    • Also Arnold himself at the end of the episode "24 Hours to Live".
    • Curly, with the emphasis on crazy (and not a "cool, kooky" crazy either. More like a "This kid needs serious mental help" crazy). To elaborate, he once broke some animals out of a zoo - alone. Just because he wanted to.
    • Chocolate Boy can be this, too. Apparently, he's spent so much time around chocolate that he can be used to literally sniff out Helga and Harold after they get separated following a tour at a chocolate tour (made all the more impressive, because this was several hours after the duo had been lost). Made funnier because he's literally put on a leash.
  • Critical Research Failure:
    • A few on Romeo and Juliet in "School Play":
      • Everyone (including Mr. Simmons) acts as though the Last Kiss is the only part that matters and there's a lot of tension about it. Romeo and Juliet actually kissed multiple times in the playnote . Additionally, in an attempt to persuade the potential Romeo actors, Simmons claims that said last kiss is "just one small scene". If by "small" he means "pivotal and plot-relevant" then he's right.
      • Most glaringly, Lila claims that the moral of the play is "true love conquers all". If anything, it was the opposite; Shakespeare made a point that Romeo and Juliet were simply two infatuated teenagers whose love affair and suicides ruined both their families.
    • In "Ghost Bride", when Gerald begins telling the legend, he says: "It all started 80 years ago, back in the Middle Age". Gerald clearly needs to do some fact-checking, since the Middle Age ended almost 500 years ago. Though this actually makes a bit of sense considering his age.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Helga. In the series she is a Jerkass Woobie who is horribly neglected by her parents, but who also can be mean, selfish, rude (and even cruel in some instances) does many things moved by jealousy, constantly bullies other kids (not only Arnold). However, despite that, many fanfics (especially romantic fanfics) portray her almost as a saint. This happens mostly because a lot of viewers see themselves in her, a sentiment amplified by her main character status.
    • Curly to an extent, is this to fans also.
  • Die for Our Ship: Lila gets this a lot from Arnold/Helga shippers.
    • In a way, Helga herself seems feel like this about her. She's mostly okay with Lila (she finds her ever-so-annoying, not much more) as long as Arnold's not around.
  • Ear Worm: Several, including the opening theme.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Arnold's parents, Miles and Stella, are much more popular than you'd think, considering that they only appeared in two episodes for the longest time.
    • One Shot Characters Stoop Kid and Pigeon Man get mentioned very often, for having only one episode each.
    • Some of the other kids such as Curly, Lorenzo, Nadine, Brainy, Sheena, and Patty are fairly popular with the fans as well.
  • Epileptic Trees: A theory that has been thrown around in recent years is that Lila has been sexually abused in the past due to her speech patterns, way of dressing, and her politeness. It's usually assumed her Missing Mom did it. Most fans don't honestly believe it but it's still cited frequently.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: In the episode "Full Moon", Arnold sees Stinky, Sid, and Harold moon the principal, and ends up getting a month dentention because he doesn't want to be 'a rat' for telling.
    Harold: You told him, didn't you?!
    Arnold: (deadpan) No.
    Harold: (in disbelief) Well, why not?!?!
    Arnold: Because it wouldn't be right.
  • Fanfic Fuel: Craig Bartlett revealed enough details about the Jungle Movie and The Patakis, that many fanfic writers have written their own versions. The Jungle Movie itself is finally happening, so it will be interesting to see how much the fanfic authors get right.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: The four episodes that most fans can't stand are "Girl Trouble", "Bag of Money", "New Bully on the Block", and "Arnold Betrays Iggy", the last of which is almost unanimously considered to be the worst episode of the series, so much so that there was a long-standing rumor that Craig Bartlett hated "Arnold Betrays Iggy" so much that he had it banned from reruns (when really, Bartlett just demoted Iggy to an extra and never gave him another Day in the Limelight episode again).
  • Friendly Fandoms: With fans of other Slice of Life shows, particularly Nicktoons. The show's wiki has an entire article dedicated to shows with a similar premise.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • At the end of "The Flood", as floodwaters surround PS 118, Principal Wartz stands on the roof of the school singing, "Way down yonder, in New Orleans..." This became a lot less funny after Hurricane Katrina caused extensive flooding and damage in New Orleans in 2005.
    • In "Helga on the Couch", Mr. Simmons gets nervous when he learns that the school psychologist will be observing is class, stuttering and asking for reassurance that she will just be observing the students, and not him, the teacher. While this is a moment played for laughs when the viewer is a child, as an older viewer who knows about the above-mentioned Word of Gay, he was likely still in the closet and worried that the school psychologist would see through him and expose him, which could have disastrous backlash from the parents whose children attends P.S. 118.
    • In "Curly Snaps", Curly loses his mind because he feels like he isn't respected by the other students and teachers, locks himself in the principal's office, and assaults people with dodgeballs. The episode aired half a year before the Columbine High School Massacre, when such behavior would be considered way less funny.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • For the first half of season 1, the character designs weren't as detailed, and many characters such as Phoebe didn't have very defined personalities. By the second half of the season, almost all characters had their "permanent" designs, and the writing got better, with fan-favorite episodes like Pigeon Man and Arnold's Christmas. By the end of Season 2, the series had decided which characters to focus on, and seemed to have a better idea of what it wanted to do.
    • To an extent, the latter half of the series is an improvement over the first half, due to further improvements on the animation, and delving into some darker and more emotional stories, with episodes like Helga on the Couch, Parents Day, and Arnold's Thanksgiving.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • It was once implied that Helga's dysfunctional home life was the end result of her sister Olga moving out (as her parents favored Olga over Helga), leading her dad to push Helga to be more like her older sister while Miriam became a covert alcoholic (or "smoothie" drinker) just to cope with dealing with a Jerkass like Bob and a bratty daughter like Helga. The episode "Helga on the Couch" revealed that Helga's been neglected by her parents since she was preschool-aged and that her secret crush on Arnold was the first time anyone has given her any sort of affection in her life.
    • The episode "Rich Kid" involves the new kid Lorenzo who has a cell phone, beeper, his own laptop, etc and is basically a mini adult who needs to act like a kid. Many kids in the 2010s have their own cell phones, tablets, computers, etc and one complaint among older people is that kids are growing up too fast more than ever.
    • The whole kids growing up too fast thing is also mentioned by Helga in "Helga's Makeover" when all the girls at Rhonda's slumber party are obsessed with wearing makeup and trying to look more adult. She mentions how wearing a face mask to "prevent wrinkles and signs of age" is asinine because they're only nine years old and don't have wrinkles or signs of age. She also questions wearing high-heels since they're already taller than the boys. Sadly this is Truth in Television even today with prepubescent girls being obsessed with makeup and acting like adults.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • In "Eating Contest," Grandpa declares "By Odin's beard!" in bewilderment after seeing Seymour aka the Disposal, Arnold's chief competition in the titular contest, in action. Granted, this was a common utterance of The Mighty Thor's long before the episode aired, but it didn't experience a memetic resurgence until Marvel vs. Capcom 3 came along.
    • "Olga Gets Engaged" revolves around Olga falling in love with and getting engaged to a guy Helga disapproves of and who happens to be a Jerkass. Frozen would do the exact same thing years later, only with the seniority of the sister reversed.
    • "The Old Building" opens with Arnold dreaming about swinging across the city, coming in on a wrecking ball.
    • The end of "The List" has Grandma sing a pep-up song to Arnold after he spent the rest of the episode as The Chew Toy. Arnold's part has him say "I had a bad day, nothing went right, I hate my dumb life, I'm down," with the same melody as Daniel Powter's Bad Day. The episode came out in 1996, while the song was recorded in 2002. Makes you wonder if the latter got it from the former, or if it's just an amazing coincidence.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Oh, Helga...
    • Jolly Olly Man, the ice cream vendor though some had a hard time understanding his frustration caused by only a boring job, and his problems keeping it which may have something to do with his jerkassery which delves into Nightmare Fuel. It's not good for the business if you act like a raging psychopath even with your customers. And he had no idea what's wrong with his behavior. Arnold had to teach him the basics of common courtesy. And there's also the fact he has a horrible father who constantly gives him crap for their business. Even the episode ends with the two not resorting their problems.
    • Harold has his moments too in some episodes such as "Weighing Harold", where he's ridiculed by his own friends of all people for being overweight.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Nick tried to invoke this trope for the release of Hey Arnold! The Movie. Basically, Helga's Love Confession was supposed to be the big thing that would attract fans to watch the movie. Unfortunately, the trailer revealed a little too much.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "STOOP KID'S AFRAID TO LEAVE HIS STOOP! STOOP KID'S AFRAID TO LEAVE HIS STOOP! STOOP KID'S AFRAID TO LEAVE HIS STOOP!"
    • Grandpa Phil's embellished war story of him fighting Hitler and giving him a wedgie.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Some fans' Die for Our Ship sentiments for Lila count as this. Lila tends to get hate for being Arnold's crush throughout the last part of the series and "getting in the way of Arnold/Helga". Which is odd, because Lila did nothing but gently and repeatedly turn Arnold down (and it was Arnold who kept trying to get close to her, and ended up disappointed as a result. Lila never tried to intentionally hurt his feelings), and is nothing but helpful to Helga, letting her kiss Arnold and keeping her secret safe.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • When Scheck attempts to stop Arnold, Helga, and Gerald's bus in The Movie by blowing up the overpass. Even Nick Vermicelli is reluctant to do this. Later, Scheck also tries to run over Arnold and Gerald with his car.
    • Iggy crosses the line when he forces Arnold to wear his bunny pajamas in public as a way of forgiveness during the climax of his Day in the Limelight. The episode itself ends on the note that Iggy has gone beyond Arnold's forgiveness.
  • My Real Daddy: A voice actor variation. The show's cast was great and extremely memorable, so this was bound to happen. And while some of the boys were voiced by multiple actors, in a few cases, one would last long enough or have a big enough impact in the role that they're remembered as the actor who voiced him, despite having only been one of several.
    • Francesca Smith's voice of Helga is so perfect for the character, that she got the role immediately after Craig Bartlett heard her audition and pretty much no one can imagine Helga with another voice. The same with Jamil Smith, the voice of Gerald. He got the role right away, and when his voiced changed, Craig Bartlett wrote an in-series explanation for the change just to keep him in. (The two of them, along with Justin Shenkarow (Harold), Dan Castellaneta (Grandpa), and Tress MacNeille (Grandma), were in the series from the 1994 pilot until the final episode produced in 2001.)
    • Ben Diskin is usually remembered as the Eugene, despite having been the third actor to voice him; he lasted three seasons in the part, and was the only one of the four boys who played him to have continued with voice acting after hitting puberty, thus establishing Eugene as one of the "breakthrough" roles of his career.
    • Adam Wylie was so memorable as Curly that he was brought back to the role after having been replaced - twice. In fact, of the four actors to voice Curly, two of the others only lasted for one episode each, and the third (Michael Welch) appeared in only two.
    • Arnold himself is more unclear. There have been several Arnoldsnote , but two have a pretty good claim to being the "real" Arnold:
      • Lane Toran (then known and credited as Toran Caudell) was the first Arnold on the show propernote  and only lasted one season in the part (though he subbed in for Philip Van Dyke in the season 2 Musical Episode "What's Opera, Arnold?" because Van Dyke wasn't a confident singer). Even after his voice broke, he remained with the show for its entirely as the bully Wolfgang, a role created specifically for him. Due to First Installment Wins, he's often remembered as "the" Arnold by the media - in 2015, a widely-reported story (with pictures!) noted how "the voice of Arnold" was all grown up. Toran is also frequently invited to fan conventions and panels reminiscing about his time on the show, alongside Francesca Marie Smith.
      • Spencer Klein, unlike both Toran and Philip Van Dyke, appeared only as Arnold (he was replaced very late into the show's run, so Craig Bartlett didn't have time to recast him as somebody else, as he had done for the other two), and made the most appearances as the Football Headnote . Each of the three voice actors portrayed Arnold slightly differently, but Klein's overtly romantic, serious, sensitive, and somewhat exaggerated goody-goody take on the character is how he is usually depicted in fanon.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Iggy. In most episodes, he's simply a background character, with only one or two notable lines at most. "Arnold Betrays Iggy", his Day in the Limelight, will forever have him be known for all of the (well-deserved) negative tropes on this page.
    • Good luck finding anyone who will forgive Harold for wrecking Pigeon Man's home.
    • Also, good luck finding someone that will forgive Big Bob for calling Arnold an orphan in "Parents Day".
  • Popularity Polynomial: The show was quite popular among kids when it was airing, and its fanbase went mostly dormant after it ended. But in 2009, around the time when the kids who grew up with the show became adults, a fan effort to save the never-produced Jungle Movie was started. The launch of The '90s Are All That in 2011 further increased the interest in the series. By 2012, talk on social networks about the series had dramatically increased. Nowadays, the series is fondly remember as one of Nick's top 90s shows.
    • Nickelodeon is very aware of the boost in popularity the series experienced in the early 2010s. This eventually led to them announcing that the long-awaited Jungle Movie would be finally made, in an attempt to Win Back the Crowd after some rough years, while also introducing the show to a new generation of kids.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • While Lila is portrayed in the series as a nice girl, many fanfics tend to demonize her, portraying her as a cruel, Manipulative Bitch (or in T-rated fics, as a slut).
    • Many of the more grimdark fanfictions portray Big Bob as a physically abusive father, despite that in the series, he was horrified that he nearly hurt Helga in "Arnold's Halloween". Most of his redeeming moments, such as in "Arnold's Thanksgiving" and "Quantity Time" are also often ignored.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Lila toward the end of the series. While she's not universally hated by any means, you'd be hard-pressed to find people that are honestly fans at this time. Her being an irritating parody Purity Sue didn't stop her from having a fanbase in Seasons 2 and 3, (hell, she was actually The Woobie when she first debuted!) It was mainly due to the Romantic Plot Tumor love triangle of Seasons 4 and 5 (and accompanying Die for Our Ship sentiments) that pushed her into Scrappydom.
    • Similar to Lila is Olga, Helga's older sister. The show established some Hidden Depths with her, however it also made her a hypocrite who goes out of her way to get her parent's attention. Not to mention she doesn't seem to grasp the extent of Helga's Parental Neglect nor does she seem to follow through with promises she made to Helga. For example, in "Student Teacher", Helga pleaded with her to keep any embarrassing stories out. Olga either forgets, or deliberately tells an embarrassing story to the class after Stinky fails a test. And sends Helga to detention afterwards.
    • Iggy from the episode "Arnold Betrays Iggy". It doesn't help that the episode itself ends on the note that Iggy has gone beyond Arnold's forgiveness.
    • A lot of the older kids (save for Patty and Torvald) from Jerk Jock Wolfgang to the Sixth Grade Girl Posse to Big Brother Bully Jamie O can be seen as this by fans for being almost complete and utter Jerkasses to Arnold and friends and getting little to no comeuppance for their actions.
    • Gerald's little sister Timberly gets a lot of hate in fandom mainly for being really annoying and is usually hindering Arnold and Gerald's plans in any episode where she plays a key role. The best example of this is the "Chocolate Turtles" episode.
    • Sid. He is a Poisonous Friend who betrays everyone at the drop of a hat, makes fun of Harold and Patty like a Jerkass, and everyone forgets he pulls the same crap over, and over, and over again. Whenever Sid gets A Day in the Limelight, it highlights how weird and off-kilter he is, and not in a likable way either. "Bag of Money" is the most notable example of why Sid is often disliked.
    • Big Bob could also count as one. Some people really don't respond well to his poor parenting. Plus there's the fact that he is the antagonist to Arnold and company in several episodes, most notably "Parents Day".
    • Oskar Kokoshka to some fans for being outright lazy and being overall terrible and sexist towards his wife Suzie. And whenever he has a problem, he uses Arnold to do all the things for him. It went to the point when even Arnold called him a loser. These antics also seem to make him an In-Universe Scrappy also. However, other fans find him pathetic enough to Love to Hate.
  • Seasonal Rot: Seasons 4 and 5 could count as this, due to Arnold becoming an incorruptible moral beacon and the Arnold/Helga/Lila love triangle being overexposed. There were still many good episodes in them though, particularly "Veterans Day", "Helga on the Couch" and "The Journal." As far as seasonal rot goes, Hey Arnold! got off pretty easy. In fact, a lot of people agree that the show never really dropped on quality.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • Lila/Arnie vs Lila/Stinky vs Lila/Brainy.
    • Stinky/Lila vs Stinky/Gloria.
    • Rhonda/Curly vs Rhonda/Harold vs Rhonda/Sid.
    • Harold/Patty vs Harold/Rhonda.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Whenever fans think of the episode "Pigeon Man", they think of Vincent's speech and take-off at the end.
    • The ending of "Parents Day".
    • "Helga on the Couch" is mostly remembered by the preschool flashback.
    • For Hey Arnold! The Movie, it's either the Love Confession or the bus chase.
    • The last line of "The Journal" ("Grandma! Grandpa! I found a map!") is remembered for the... wrong reasons.
  • Squick:
    • Arnie's snorting is pretty gross.
    • Brainy making those wheezing noises isn't too much better.
    • It understandably never made it into the show, but an early idea by Craig Bartlett was that there was supposed to be an adult female border named Lana (she can be seen in the background of early episodes) who was supposed to be constantly trying to seduce Arnold while Arnold is understandably uncomfortable with her advances.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: In "Gerald's Game", Iggy is put in stockades during the big card game, and actually gets a speaking part (same VA as in "Arnold Betrays Iggy", in fact) shouting at Arnold "No, Arnold! Don't do it! You'll become a dungeon pawn!", at which point Big Gino tells him to shut up and throws a cloth over the stocks, completely covering Iggy's face.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Though many of Arnold's classmates have A Day in the Limelight, Sheena never received her own episode.
    • Nadine was pretty much ignored unless she was around Rhonda despite having an established personality in her few appearances.
    • Poor Brainy never got a chance to really shine either, despite Word of God establishing that he and Helga have more in common than we might think.
    • Many of the borders who appeared only in season 1 such as Lana Vail, Mr. Purdy, and Mr. Smith could've been good characters had they lasted the show's run. Later seasons imply that they all moved out.
    • Ruth has this status with some fans, especially those who preferred her over Lila.
    • Torvald only made two appearances despite apparently still being in Arnold's class (he isn't usually seen in classroom scenes).
    • Suzie never really played much of a role in the series other than as a Satellite Love Interest to Oskar.
    • We never found out who was Fuzzy Slippers, Gerald's mysterious informant.
  • Toy Ship: Every shipping in the series. The most popular ones are Arnold/Helga and Gerald/Phoebe. Although they're canonically children in the show, fanfiction writers usually crank up their ages to make the story more appropriate.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • In "Helga and the Nanny", Big Bob hires a new nanny to help around the house. Helga obviously finds this annoying since she's pretty much been taking care of herself since kindergarten, but the nanny goes down a hit with her parents and the kids at school like her and Helga is given the What the Hell, Hero? treatment for getting her fired. But the thing is, Inga constantly embarrasses Helga and treats her like a dumb kid, like forcing her into a dress that gets her teased by the other kids, making her "show her father respect" when Bob constantly ignores and neglects Helga. Though it was wrong for her to go that far, it's understandable Helga would want Inga out of her life.
    • Arnold in "Egg Story". He immediately assumes Helga is going to start picking on him and lays down the law, even telling her she's the last person he'd like to be paired up with. This leads to both of them arguing until the end of the episode, where they admit they were both wrong. However, Arnold had no good reason for being so harsh on her, since Helga did nothing to him in the beginning of the episode, and at this point in the series, they've gotten along several times, and he already knows she's not as bad as she acts. Not to mention it simply feels Out of Character for Arnold to say those things to anyone at all.
    • Pretty much every other kid in "Curly's Girl". Everyone immediately hates Rhonda after she dumps Curly in public (which, admittedly, was cruel on her part, though she had a good reason for wanting do so) and makes him depressed. However, no one seems to bother to ask for her side of the story (not even Nice Guy Arnold or her best friend Nadine), nor does anyone seem to remember how unstable and twisted Curly can be (False Alarm, Ghost Bride, Curly Snaps). Not to mention Curly pretty much PG-13 sexually harasses Rhonda by blackmailing her into kissing him, which she is clearly not comfortable with.
  • Unpopular Popular Character: Eugene's peers (bar Arnold) ostracize him for being a jinx and being all around unlucky. However, he has a lot of fans for his charming personality.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Arnold is the Only Sane Man to contrast his quirky classmates and eccentric non-traditional family.
  • Vindicated by History: The opinions surrounding Hey Arnold! The Movie have softened over the years. Though there still is a mixed opinion surrounding it, it's nowhere near as negative as the initial reception.note  While pretty much everyone agrees that it should've stayed as a TV movie, many fans say the movie is pretty decent on its own right, and is enough to please fans of the show.
  • Wangst:
    • Olga is a master of this. In "Olga Comes Home", she spends days sobbing about it in her room, with dramatic music in the background and a serious case of Your Makeup Is Running. Even Big Bob starts to get tired of her histrionics — she only snaps out of it when Helga admits she changed her grades out of spite.
    • Invoked in "Rhonda Goes Broke" when she spends most of her time crying when she has to live in the boarding house after her family lose all their money. Arnold eventually talks some sense into her and Rhonda gets a She's Back moment.
  • What an Idiot:
  • What Do You Mean, It Wasn't Made on Drugs?: The original claymation shorts.
  • Word of Dante: Pigeon Man jumping to his death after finding his home destroyed in the original ending of "Pigeon Man", but being changed to him flying away because Nickelodeon felt it too depressing. Show creator Craig Bartlett repeatedly debunked this, stating they never intended Pigeon Man to commit suicide. Another rumour is that his flying away with his pigeons is still him committing suicide, just veiled to get past censors. This is likewise false as he was never intended to commit suicide and appears in the sequel film The Jungle Movie.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/HeyArnold