YMMV / Diablo III

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Do Witch Doctors really commune with the spirits or are they just Hearing Voices that describe their intuitions? At no point do the "spirits" tell them anything they couldn't have guessed on their own.
    • Is Inarius truly a bad Fallen Angel who deserves all his punishment by Mephisto for not sticking with his brethren, or is he the Only Sane Man who thinks that the whole 'Eternal Conflict' is tiringly stupid and should be put to rest forever?
  • Animation Age Ghetto: If any game uses any form of stylized graphics, expect people to dismiss it as being "kiddy". Also, complaining about the game not being "Dark" enough when the trailer featured a barbarian being ripped in half. Yes, totally for children. To elaborate, the game is dark and insanely gory. Large portions of Act I take place in an enormous torture chamber. The game is full of massacres, genocides and horrors. It's not the scariest game ever released by any stretch of the imagination, but just because the game's colors have a little saturation and waterfalls have rainbows over them doesn't mean the game is Diablo Lite.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: The eponymous boss himself. Diablo's damage output is honestly pitful, especially in phase one. In phase 2, the clones of your heroes he summons are more deadly than he is, and in phase 3, his most dangerous attack, a giant laser, is slow enough that it is easily dodged. To make matters worse, he will not shut up about how scary he is and how much despair you should be in.
  • Arc Fatigue: The Zoltun Kulle part of Act II is generally agreed to be rather obnoxiously long. First you have to find his head, go through a dungeon to find a crucible for your new jeweler, go through 2 more dungeons to find Kulle's blood, find his archives, go through 3 MORE dungeons to get your hands on his body and then you finally get to fight him for the Black Soulstone.
  • Awesome Ego: The Wizard is a narcissistic Insufferable Genius who's nevertheless sufficiently heroic and badass to back up every one of their boasts.
  • Catharsis Factor: When it became clear that Adria was a killable story boss in Reaper of Souls, there was much rejoicing by players who couldn't wait to sock their fists into her face. Don't worry, the heroes also agree. If doing it once in story is not enough, there's always Adventure Mode to repeat that ad nauseam, and sometimes you get rewarded for it too. The achievement for killing Adria in co-op mode is even called "Group Therapy".
  • Cliché Storm: Part of the charm of this series in general. This game is no different.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • Most players will look for items with Critical Hit chance and damage and attack speed (before 2.0) / elemental damage (after 2.0) (items that have all three attributes have even been given a specific name, "trifecta"). Anything that don't have those characteristics is treated as trash.
    • Look for a guide giving you a possible build for your character. Chances are that said guide lists Convention of Elements in the ring slot. Said ring cycles through all elements available to your character, giving a 200% damage boost to the selected element. If you time your attacks with the right section of the cycle, the damage boost is impressive — but it forces a playstyle that not all players like (waiting for the right element to come up before unleashing your strongest attack), in detriment of a more fluid, active playstyle. A common opinion about the subject is "the ring itself is fine, the lack of options is the problem": you may not like said playstyle, but there's not much more of a choice for your ring slot.
  • Complete Monster: Adria pledged herself to Diablo's service since first meeting Prince Aidan of Tristran after he imprisoned Diablo's soul within himself and became the Dark Wanderer. Starting off by burning alive her own father, she spent the time between the first and third games gathering up the power of the other Lords of Hell so she could use the Black Soulstone to bring about Diablo's rebirth in the body of her own daughter, an act that in the setting would damn Leah's soul to hell. Adria manipulated her daughter and all of her friends with the express purpose of inserting the Black Soulstone in her chest and allowing Diablo to devour her from within, manifesting anew to destroy the High Heavens and humanity as the Prime Evil.
  • Contested Sequel: Oh boy is it ever. There's been complaints that it's "dumbing down for casuals" because of more refined skill selection as opposed to skill trees, and that the graphics being more colorful is a bad thing. And that's not even getting into the always-online requirements.
  • Crazy Awesome:
  • Critical Backlash: Despite that it was bombed to lower than Big Rigs: Over the Road Racing (mostly by irate fans or haters), the reviewers loved it. And for that matter, judging by how many people consistently log on and play, seems that Blizzard did something right.
  • Critical Dissonance: The game has received universal acclaim from professional critics, with favorable reviews from a big majority of them (it has an average critic review of 87%). The playerbase, however, is divided by what could be the biggest schism caused by any game in Blizzard's history (the playerbase ranks it as 35%). Most of the driving force for this schism seems to be the bad launching day, the length of the game and features that tick the fans off. The argument is not as dramatic as what happened with Mass Effect 3, but it is still very noticeable. This is largely due to the requirement of being online at all times, the subsequent server problems from overloading (the "Error 37" message even earned Memetic Mutation status), the controversial Auction Houses and severe lag spikes as well as many Game Breaking and server-crashing bugs that came with launch. Luckily most of these bugs were fixed in the first few weeks, but it was too little, too late in the eyes of many gamers.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: The fact that it sucks to live in Sanctuary is sometimes used to generate some good laughs every now and then. The "Forlorn Farm" event from Act I is a good example.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • The game continues the tradition with the various elite packs you will encounter on higher difficulties. Many of the monster traits these elites come with aren't too bad on their own, but in the higher difficulties, elites and their minions can have one to four (depending on your level) of these traits at once, and they will use them to their fullest extent to ruin your day, at times being even tougher to kill than end-of-act bosses if they get a particularly nasty combination of powers. To name just a few:
      • Arcane Enchanted enemies. These guys love to lay down these purple laser things reminiscent of those fire stick things from Super Mario Bros.. And they hurt if you get hit by it or if one spawns right under you when you can't get away (say, when you're locked down by a Jailer).
      • Jailers combined with any attack that does high damage over time, like a Desecration pool or a Blazing Guardian's fireball.
      • Shielding enemies are just a royal pain in the ass in general, but when combined with other screw-you-worthy powers, they can really ruin your day.
      • Mortar enemies can rain unholy hell down on you (which is very problematic if you're a ranged class), though they have a minimum range.
      • Molten enemies leave damaging pools of lava in their wake, making melee problematic at best, and explode upon death. Getting caught inside two or three of such explosions generally means instant death on Torment difficulty or higher.
      • Fire Chains enemies are connected by a fire chain that does nasty damage if you're caught between them. And these enemies often have another quality with them as they only spawn on higher difficulties.
      • Health Link elites are particularly annoying to deal with, as they share a single, hard to bring down life bar between them.
      • Vortex elites can yank you right into melee range, which can be aggravating if you're trying to keep away from them.
      • Desecrators create a glowing void zone that does damage to anyone near them, and is a particular problem for melee characters.
      • If an enemy mob has the Reflects Damage ability, you are not going to like being in melee with it. Full stop.
      • Horde enemies, if their minions pick up other obnoxious abilities. You thought one Arcane Enchanted enemy was bad? Try eight.
    • Apart from elite packs, there's also the Desert Wasps from Act II. At a point where most enemies will be doing single digit damage, their ranged attacks will be doing several times that damage, and can hit multiple times since they fire multiple shots at once. Plus they are quick, retreat, fly over terrain, and fire at you. And never attack alone. If there's any consolation, their Bee Bee Gun attack is rather slow and easy to sidestep.
    • The Enraged Phantoms from Act V. While Wraith creatures from the other acts hit you once with their Soul Siphon attack, Enraged Phantoms hit you 5 times per single Soul Siphon. Apparently someone at Blizzard just coded in its damage without taking into account that it hits 6 times per attack. In other words, Enraged Phantasms currently do 5 times the damage they are supposed to. Not to mention their attacks can't be dodged, and they are fast and can travel through walls. They are able to one-shot characters who don't have problems with all other enemies in the same area, and players usually find white monsters of that type are more scary in terms of lethality than most elite packs. Strangely, when Blizzard reported they were considering some balancing, some players complained about it and called the ones who pointed the problem cry babies and carebears and told them to "get some better gear".
  • Designated Villain: Zoltun Kulle is universally reviled and introduced as "Torturer. Killer. Monster." Yet within the game he never does anything evil, keeps his word and gives very sound advice. According to his journals his main goal was to elevate humanity to a status that would free them from the influence of demons and angels, which is more or less what the protagonist is doing (although it's implied Kulle would have ruled over humanity to boot if he could). The only "evil" act mentioned in the game is his creation of the Black Soulstone, which the protagonists themselves seek and use with no qualms. However, supplementary materials claim he used his own wife's soul to create the Black Soulstone, which, if true, would definitely qualify as evil.
  • Disappointing Last Level: Act IV's Heaven level suffers from most of the same problems regarding Diablo II 's Hell finale, using only one type of environment and following a largely linear path. Heaven however has no town, so Bastion's Keep from the act beforehand is reused. Recitified in Reaper of Souls; Act V uses a new hub and has a decent variety of environments.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Lyndon the Scoundrel has met with near-unanimous approval from players due to his cool outfit, charming personality, and Badass Mustache. Plus, the voice of Troy Baker.
  • Evil Is Cool: Though not exactly a villain at the moment (but perhaps will be a antagonist an X-Pack), the Knight Templar Angel Imperius seems to be heading in this direction given his badass armor design and the short but badass fight between him and Diablo at the beginning of Act IV.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Torchlight II and Diablo III fans were at each other's throats since the moment both games started entering the final steps of development. Runic Games remained, for the most part, silent, but every new Blizzard announcement almost invariably lead to someone mentioning TL2 and triggering a massive Flame War. Now that both games have been out in the wild for a while, most people on either side will acknowledge the merits of the other, but the two games are just similar yet just different enough that it's tough to be a fan of both.
    • Some animosity developed between D3 fans and Path of Exile fans around summer of 2017, when Diablo III got the Rise of the Necromancer expansion that added only one new class and a few other things for $15, while PoE got the Fall of Oriath expansion that added six new acts and a bunch of other content, for free.
  • Foe Yay: In one of the books, it's implied that Mephisto had a thing for Auriel.
  • Game-Breaker: The Auction House, which essentially destroyed the point of the game: Killing monsters and collecting loot. In fact, Blizzard decided to close it for this very reason.
    • Equip an item that causes all your other items to become indestructible. Enter a situation where normally your items' durability would be a limiting factor on how many tries you get. Laugh (or cry—unlimited lives and That One Boss who randomly spawned are not fun) because you now have as many attempts as you want on that dungeon.
    • The Witch Doctor is generally derided as being both extremely damaging and very safe. They only fall short of being completely game breaking because they tend to be a little slower overall then the other classes. Essentially, trading clear speed for Juggernaut status. Most players still feel they're quite over powered due to their ease of use compared to other classes.
    • The Pylons, from the Rifts and Greater Rifts. Essentially more powerful versions of shrines, finding one is enough to turn the tide of any Rift. They include the Power Pylon (Quad Damage), Shield Pylon (invulnerability), Speed Pylon (attack and move much faster, as well as knock enemies out of your way), Channeling Pylon (free spell casting and very quick cooldowns), and Conduit Pylon (constant high-powered electric damage to nearby enemies). They only last a few seconds each, but it's usually enough to clear out at least a few groups of Elites with ease.
  • Goddamned Bats: Plenty.
    • The Fallen Prophet enemy types. They do little to no damage on their own, as their attacks are weak, slow, and easy to avoid. But they can resurrect the Fallen-type enemies, which makes it a chore to clear out any sections where both Fallen and the Prophets appear. It leads to always going for this enemy type first just to make it less of a headache.
    • Leapers, sand worms, and dune threshers burrow under the ground and pop up randomly to say hello.
    • Various bird like enemies fly above your head, invulnerable, and divebomb you only when you engage the next enemy pack.
    • Shadow vermin come in tidal waves and will block you, allowing more powerful enemies to close in. And they're hard to see in the darker zones unless you turn on enemy health bars.
    • Lacuni Huntresses may not have much health, but they love to ambush you, come in packs, move fast, will easily close the distance between you with one leap, and attack very quickly. Sometimes they will stay far to throw a fire bomb that hurts a lot.
    • Enemy champions spawn with various randomized abilities, which sometimes negate the weaknesses of their type. For example, a slow and lumbering monster able to perform an One-Hit Kill which you're supposed to outrun may occasionally have a champion variant capable of teleporting.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • An in-game (and fully intended) example: During Act 3, Leah's journal mentions how the spirits she's trying to keep trapped within the black soulstone are starting to wear on her, but comforts herself by remembering that once Azmodan is dead and captured, and the black soulstone is destroyed, she'll be herself again. At the end of the act, before the soulstone can be destroyed, Diablo's spirit is freed from the stone and placed into Leah's body, turning her into the Prime Evil and the end boss of the game, whom the player must then destroy to save the day.
    • Another one: During Act 3, a runner from Westmarch reports that the king will send no reinforcements to fight imaginary demons. Tyrael harshly replies, "Perhaps he'll believe when his kingdom burns to ashes around him!" Guess what happens in Reaper of Souls...
  • Hype Backlash: Some of this may have contributed to the Contested Sequel status.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • The release of the game didn't go smoothly, with tons of error messages, the impossibility to play, the servers being unable to hold the mass of players, and cases of characters disappearing from the character list. Cue hordes of rightfully angry players complaining on the official forums, pointing out that the absence of an offline mode prevented them from enjoying the game at all. While trying to fix the server issues, Blizzard ended up setting a queue line (like World of Warcraft), which was the icing on the cake. There were also a lot of people saying "You went to an online game within a minute of launch, what did you think was going to happen?", which only helped fan the flames some more due to the fact that the preceding games in the series had offline modes.
    • Later, there were widespread reports of account hackings in different regions and authenticators having said they had been hacked. Naturally, Blizzard gave canned responses and blamed the player with threats of banning if it happens twice.
    • And then there were the frequent maintenance breaks, forcing players who just wanted to play singleplayer to wait 8 hours, and full servers leading to Error 37 on busy weekend hours long after most players assumed that launch hiccups should have been a thing of the past.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks: So many people are online at once - therefore it sucks because millions of people flood the servers!
  • It's Short, So It Sucks:
    • The campaign is fairly short, even if you increase the difficulty as you play. It took the relatively late addition of Adventure Mode to add real longevity... but since all Adventure Mode consists of is endlessly repeating areas and enemies from Campaign, it can lead to It's the Same, Now It Sucks.
    • Rise of the Necromancer has gotten flak due to costing $15 yet not even having any new areas, Acts, or modes to go with the price tag; only a new class, extra stash tabs, and cosmetic options.note  To compare, the Reaper of Souls expansion adds a new game mode, a new class, and a new Act for $10.

      It doesn't help that about a couple months later, competing game Path of Exile got an expansion pack of its own, The Fall of Oriath, that adds a slew of new content (most notably, six new Acts bringing the game up to ten Acts) free of charge, making Blizzard look even worse and stoking the Fandom Rivalry between the two games' playerbases.
  • It Was His Sled:
    • The nature of the "Fallen Star" in Tristram is technically a mystery, but since it's revealed so early on few people still treat it as a spoiler.
    • Even though he was killed in the previous game, you fight Diablo. Players might still spend much of the game wondering exactly how this comes about, except that...
    • Even outside the Diablo fanbase, most know about Adria's betrayal, and Leah being Diablo's daughter.
  • Loot Drama: This game has a different system: loot drops are exclusive to each player, and you literally cannot even see what other players get unless they pick it up and then drop it again, which makes it visible to everyone. This doesn't completely eliminate Loot Drama, but it does mean that if you do get some coveted item the rest of the party won't know about it unless you rub it in their faces. However, this is played straight in the console versions' same-screen couch co-opnote , due to the loot spawning on said screen for all players to pick up. It's especially bad if one or more of you are playing classes that either use the same weapons as others, or require the same stat boosts as others.
  • Magnificent Bastard: The Prime Evil as a whole were this in the first and second game, but Diablo takes the title of his own in this one by Out-Gambitting them all with the Lesser Evil and the protagonist. Diablo masterminded his own resurrection so that he'd absorb all the lesser evils into himself.....and the Player Character helped him accomplish this for 2nd and 3rd acts.
  • Memetic Loser: Fans love to mock Azmodan's spectacular failure to back up his reputation as an uncanny tactician. This fanart illustrates this pretty well.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Error 37. "Error 37.com" was created within an hour of the game going live. Twitter is flooded with messages about it (#error37), and the "Diablo III Midnight Launch" Facebook event's page was wall-to-wall Error 37 Memes. Explanation 
    • "Diablo III is not a single player game"Explanation 
    • "GLORIOUS!"
    • "No one can stop Death" seems to be heading there already.
    • "Aren't you Thankful?" The video-game company Blizzard.Explanation 
    • "5$" Explanation 
    • I promised Marko I'd protect him, and now he's dead.Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Adria is revealed in her betrayal to have crossed this long ago when it is revealed that she created Leah to be a host for Diablo and the other six Evils long ago by letting the human-bound Diablo impregnate her! To take it even further, due to how disoriented his host was this is implied to not be entirely consensual. In other words, Adria date raped Satan. The utter cruelty of the betrayal in question is also seriously damning for Adria, especially since it results in the death of one of the most sympathetic characters in the game and makes the entire fourth act of the game possible. This is also regarded an in-universe reaction: During the actual confrontation of Adria in the next act in the expansion, the heroes made it clear that by this act, Adria revoked her rights to live or call herself human and she doesn't have any places in the future that humanity will shape.
    • You know Maghda and the Coven are bad news from the get-go, but they really seal the deal when they capture Cain while the hero is searching for the broken shards of Tyrael's sword, then torture and kill him right in front of Leah. And that was after their destruction of the town of Wortham.
    • The Order's Inquisitors are revealed to have crossed this with their fabrication of the sins that Kormac was said to have committed. Kormac really didn't commit any crimes, much less anything worth the Cold-Blooded Torture they inflicted upon him to make him forget it all. And judging from Jondar's loss of loyalty to the Order soon after reading the "key words" that restored his own memory, Kormac isn't the first Templar initiate that they've done this to.
      • In Reaper of Souls, you and Kormac face down the Grand Maester during his sidequest, The Templar Reckoning, who crosses this in his proclamation by announcing his intent to start recruiting and "cleansing" people on a grander scale, putting every citizen of Westmarch and beyond through the horrible torture and brainwashing that Kormac and Jondar were put through in order to make them Templars. Not for nothing does Kormac call the proclamation in question "damning".
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • Zoltan Kulle's Evil Laugh after every spot of dialogue can go from terrifying to rather irritating pretty quickly due to how frequently it happens. Then you defeat the Obviously Evil bastard in a boss fight and never have to hear from him again...at least until Act V, where the Kanai's Cube quest forces you to hear it one last time.
    • The sound of a defeated Molten enemy's explosion build-up can get tiring quite easily, especially if it's an Elite pack of Molten enemies slain in succession.
    • Several town NPC lines can become this due to how frequently they're triggered every time you portal back to town:
      Squirt:note  "New goods today! Please look, you won't be disappointed."
      Tristram militia:note  "I promised Marko I'd protect him, and now he's dead."
      Brother Malachi the Healer:note  "Zakarum has fallen to disgrace! What faith can save us now?"
      Tyrael: "My stomach feels strange..."note 
  • Most Wonderful Sound: The distinct chime of a Legendary item being dropped.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • The game will always have to live with the history of its day-1 Demand Overload and the infamous Error 37, even though it's been over five years since the game's launch and server load has decreased dramatically since.
    • The Auction Houses left a long-lasting bitter aftertaste in many players due to the pay-to-win nature of them, even over three years after they were shut down and drop rates boosted to compesnate.
  • Player Punch:
    • She isn't even the boss of Act I, but come Act II, killing Magdha takes even higher priority than stopping Belial. Why? Because she kills Deckard Cain.
    • The game ups the ante. Not only is longtime fan-favorite Deckard Cain Killed Off for Real by the evil Maghda and her Dark Coven, but Leah, probably the most sympathetic character in the entire saga, who you have spent the entire game getting to know and love, is used by her own mother Adria as a vessel for Diablo himself to be reborn as the Prime Evil in the finale of Act III. Made even worse for players who only have the vanilla version of Diablo III, since Adria runs off after Diablo appears and isn't fought unless you get the expansion. Much like Maghda, the moment Adria's location is found out in Reaper of Souls, killing her is treated as a higher priority over Malthael's plot.
    • Leah's death is bad enough, but as you're closing in on Diablo during the final act, her ghost is the very first one that Diablo uses to taunt you. And that's only the beginning — he uses the ghosts of other characters, most of them sympathetic, as you're closing in, including Captain Rumford, Marius from the second game, Mira from way back in the first act, and even Deckard frigging Cain himself. Dick move, D-man. Dick move.
    • Finding Warriv's corpse is bad enough to Diablo veterans, but then you read his journal, and realize his life had been absolute hell ever since the events of II, and he had come to New Tristram to get help in finding the cause of his horrible luck, but instead found only death. What really makes this a punch is that Warriv was actually one of the most optimistic and idealistic characters in II.
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story: The Barbarian even says "Get on with it" early on, causing Deckard Cain to say, "Nobody ever listens."
  • Scapegoat Creator: Jay Wilson gets blamed for everything that, according to the fans, has gone wrong.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • Blizzard's announcement that the game was online-only, even for single player, did not go over well. The "always online" nature of the game especially since this means the game is over for good once Blizzard decides to no longer support the Diablo III servers... (And already, at least one country can't play Diablo III because of Blizzard disabling their servers there). Exacerbated when the PC version of the game was updated to match the new features introduced in the console versions... except for the offline mode.
    • If you try to play the game in an internet cafe when the Internet at home is down, your Blizzard account will sometimes be locked due to different login sequence. You will have to answer the safety question or enter the serial number to unlock your account. This is made for safety reasons, but most other players find it extremely frustrating.
    • Some of the elite monsters's abilities, including Fire Chains, Vortex, Shielding and those arcane sentries.
    • Prior to their removal in patch 1.0.4, Enrage timers were near-universally loathed by the fanbase. Ostensibly put in to discourage farming of elite mobs and bosses in higher difficulties, it made killing said mobs and bosses impossible for undergeared players playing solo, as once the said timer activated, it was almost a guaranteed death. Fortunately, the timers for the elites was removed in a patch.
    • Prior to patch 1.0.8, the Guide Dang It! nature of the Auction House: Since only adjustments to base stats were listed, you needed either pencil & paper or a third-party site to figure out whether the item you were considering would actually be an improvement.
    • Many people disliked the fact that only ten auctions per account were allowed on the gold auction house — if you had alts or played AT ALL you would quickly exceed that limit, and combined with limited on character and joint character inventory it could be a pain. As a result, most gear you found was turned into Vendor Trash because it would take up too much space. That gear sold for so little, and giving it to the blacksmith to turn into items for him was pointless as most blacksmith items were terrible.
    • The announcement that the game would include an auction house that uses real money caused quite a controversy in the fandom. The mere existence of the auction house ticked off more than a few players, who felt that it took away the thrill of finding a really good item from a monster drop and replaced it with gold farming or just buying items with real money. The Real-money auction house also got a lot of grief, since it let players substitute real-world money for competence at actually playing the game. You could just refuse to use the Auction House, of course, but players complained that the Random Drops were balanced so as to push players toward using it, especially at higher difficulties. While Blizzard fervently denied this at the time, the fact that they accompanied the Auction House closure with a patch that greatly improved the quality of dropped gear lends credence to such suspicions. When Blizzard announced that both the gold and real money auction houses would be removed from the game in March of 2014, many fans were quite happy with the news.
    • The Nemesis system for console players. Ever been killed by a monster in the game? Have any of your PSN friends ever been killed by a monster in the game? If they, or you, have there's a decent chance that your death will spawn a Nemesis, a powerful monster that stalks you until either you kill it, or it kills you. Neither of which prevents another Nemesis spawning at some later date. Particularly vexing in higher difficulties where it can kill you in a split second regardless of how super-special-awesome your gear is. And there's no way to disable it.
    • If you are in the middle of combat, the game does not allow you to change your skill loadout. Fair point, and that rule obviously includes boss fights, but also just being in a boss room before triggering the fight itself is counted as a combat situation.
    • In a multiplayer lobby, if someone attempts to enter a boss room or start a Greater Rift, all players will receive a dialogue box asking if they want to leave wherever they are and jump to the boss fight or Rift. Unfortunately, said dialogue box is in the middle of the screen and takes up a significant chunk of the screen, meaning that a player may accidentally click on "Accept" or "Cancel" and players might even get killed by whatever they're fighting due to the center of the screen being obscured. Also, each player has only 60 seconds to decide, which can be a problem if they want to change their skill loadout (which can't be changed in a boss room or a Greater Rift) or equipment (since they have to go back to town and go through their Armories or Stashes to do that).
  • Strawman Has a Point: Lord Wyndon actually is the rightful heir to Westmarch. It's only when the Nephalem realize that he's a megalomaniacal tyrant that they decide to put him down.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: Parodied with Whimsyshire as a Take That! towards complaints about early screenshots being "too colorful."
  • That One Boss: Thanks to the game's wide range of difficulty levels and the fact that you can change difficulty level any time before loading yourself back into the game, it's possible to simply sidestep this trope by going down a difficulty level or two, but for those who don't want to do that:
    • Izual has gone from a textbook Damage-Sponge Boss to a legitimate challenge. Sure, he does place visible ice bombs around the area which you can easily avoid... for naught, as he also has a move that freezes the entire area anyways. And since he's a Flunky Boss, both Izual and his goons will be beating down on you while you're still frozen.
    • In the harder difficulty modes, some of the randomly generated minibosses can be harder to fight than the actual bosses, especially if they get a nasty combo of abilities.
    • The game continues the tradition of murderous Act 2 bosses with Belial. Up until his fight most players really get around with just punching stuff until it falls over, and for the first half of the fight, it seems to be applicable. It's a perfectly reasonable standard boss fight with mooks, like every other boss fight to that point... But then Belial goes One-Winged Angel and becomes the first real enemy where that doesn't really work, turns into the equivalent of a World of Warcraft raid boss, complete with phases where he AOE spams the entire narrow platform where you fight him, and you are required to keep moving to avoid being instagibbed by his meteor spam. This comes without a warning and with absolutely no hint on how to counter it. Most people who steamrolled the game up to this point experience their first group wipeout exactly at this point. Even on Normal difficulty it's bad, especially for the squishier classes like the Wizard. Even after knowing what's coming it's a pain in the ass, because his Enrage is brutal, as it involves Belial using a more powerful, faster, spammier version of the meteor spam until the fight ends.
    • Reaper of Souls has Adria, the second major boss of Act V, whose sweeping melee attacks hurt like Hell, who teleports all over the place, and who constantly spams blood-worms that explode into blood pools that do high damage when the player is in them.
    • Malthael may be the Final Boss in the main story, but in Adventure Mode, he's just a repeatably fightable boss, and when you do... yeah, unless you're strong, good luck with dealing with those constantly spawning mists of death that drains your life FAST if you stay in place, him going Spin Attack for constant DPS, the highly damaging Skull Spiral, summoning many enemies that likes to teleport and blast you off for high damage... If you're up to some extra achievements that requires you to kill him quick, he can get annoying.
  • That One Level: Patch 2.4 introduced Set Dungeons into Adventure Mode, four dungeons for each character class that can only be accessed if the player has six different pieces of the relevant armour set.note  Their mere existence is polarising - supporters like being made to think about how to play to the strengths of a given armour set, opponents hate the Timed Mission aspect and/or simply do not find them in any way fun - but even those who like Set Dungeons find some of them especially irritating.
    • Beating the dungeons requires completing one of two objectives (at least one of which will always require specifically targeted use of one or more of the abilities boosted by the armour set) and killing a minimum number of enemies without taking fatal damage; mastering them requires killing all enemies and completing both objectives in under four and a half minutes. For some dungeons, this simply requires the right combination of skills, while for others, a few extra items might be required, but they are otherwise easy to master with practice. However, most classes have at least one dungeon that is hair-tearingly frustrating to master.
      • For the Barbarian, the Wrath of the Wastes dungeon is the most detested, as one of the objectives is not taking physical damage for the entire dungeon. The other objective is casting Rend on ten or more enemies at once five times, so repeatedly getting into melee range of multiple enemies is a necessity. Add in swinging pendulum traps and enemies that run away when attacked and you have a recipe for pure pain.
      • The Crusader has the Roland's Legacy dungeon. Although the two objectives are easy enough to achieve, killing every enemy on the map is not, as the dungeon is enormous and most of the enemies are Imps that run away when you attack nearby enemies. Diablo discussion boards are littered with gamers venting their spleen about repeatedly having a single enemy left to kill as the timer expires and no idea where it is.
      • By and large, the Demon Hunter is viewed as having the easiest set dungeons; however, the Unhallowed Essence dungeon has a bad reputation owing to the need for kindness on the part of the enemy placement gods in order to hit 20 or more enemies with a single Multishot six times. Their slow speed means that low density cannot be countered by kiting as it can be in other dungeons where it is a problem. The Embodiment of the Marauder dungeon runs a close second not for difficulty - the map is reasonably sized and the objectives are quite easy - but for the frustration factor of getting hit by Rockworms and thus failing the objective to prevent enemies from getting into melee range. Even after the dungeon was tweaked so that the Rockworms appeared in fixed areas of the map, it's still easy to get tagged by one after standing still for a second too long.
      • The Uliana's Strategem dungeon is the most reviled of the Monk dungeons. Though Patch 2.5.0 softened one objective from detonating Exploding Palm on 21 enemies three times to 15 enemies four times, it still has a huge map in which it is easy to lose stray enemies, and the objective of taking no fire damage for the entire dungeon is mind-bendingly difficult without the ultra-rare Star of Azkaranth amulet.
      • Among the Witch Doctor set dungeons, the crown for most rage-inducing goes to the Helltooth Harness dungeon, which has both a very large map in which it is easy to lose stray enemies and enemy density that is often too low to set up the objective of killing 20 or more enemies with one Wall of Death four times without time-consumingly extensive kiting (which can be fatal without high Toughness).
      • Although most of the Wizard set dungeons are regarded as difficult even with the right equipment, the most hated is a tossup between the Delsere's Magnum Opus dungeon and Vyr's Amazing Arcana dungeon. Both have very large maps that can only be covered in four and a half minutes with constant Teleport spam, and it's all too easy to lose track of one or more of the over 600 enemies in the Vyr's dungeon.
    • Several dungeons lost their That One Level status, or at least had it diminished, in Patch 2.4.1.
      • The Might of the Earth dungeon for the Barbarian was once loathed for the tendency of two or more of the seven elites to spawn too close together to make it possible to complete the objective of casting Leap, Ground Stomp, and Earthquake in that order on each of the seven. In Patch 2.4.1, Blizzard re-designed the dungeon to make the elites spawn in fixed locations, making planning significantly easier.
      • Time was the mention of the Raiment of the Jade Harvester dungeon would make Witch Doctor players froth at the mouth with rage, as the dungeon was full of Writhing Deceiver enemies which would turn invisible for five or more seconds at a time, making it far too common to get to the end of the map with seconds left on the clock and half a dozen or more enemies left to kill that the player didn't even know were there. Patch 2.4.1 disabled the Deceivers' invisibility, so that now the map size and the clock are the main sources of frustration.
      • The Firebird's Finery dungeon used to be a source of ire for Wizard players, as one of the objectives was to ignite 20 enemies in 3 seconds six times. Too little damage per second and the dungeon could not be finished in time; too much and the enemies would die before the required three fire skills could be cast on them to ignite them. Patch 2.4.1 changed this objective to igniting or killing 20 enemies in 3 seconds, so that now high damage is an asset instead of a liability.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The game gets complaints that it's too colorful. The game's art style got a lot of flak for being too colorful and resembling Blizzard Entertainment's other title World of Warcraft. They've even started a petition wanting to replace the entirety of Diablo III with act 3 of Diablo II. Numerous counter-petitions have already been launched, and Blizzard has pointed out why Darker and Edgier graphics would be implausible or unplayable.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Witch Doctors are being loathed for being far tankier than both Wizards and Demon Hunters while somehow still dealing the most DPS out of the six classes, to the point where some players are calling the game Reaper of Witch Doctors. The fact that they are also the easiest class to learn does not help. Crusaders aren't much further behind after their buffs received in 2.0.5, though nowhere as game-breaking.
  • Vindicated by History: Big time - even before Reaper of Souls, the overhauled loot system and the console versions seem to have done this.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Blizzard is well known for their excellent cinematic work, but Diablo III sets a high water mark not just for video games but for motion picture animation as well!
  • Win Back the Crowd: The Reaper of Souls expansion appears to be answering some of the fan complaints regarding the vanilla title, including an overhauled loot system, a darker art tone, randomized maps in the form of "Loot Runs", and the removal of the auction house.
  • The Woobie:
    • Haedrig Eamon. He witnessed the murder of his father in front of his very eyes. Afterwards, he meets and marries his wife and moves to New Tristram, where she gets infected by the zombie plague and he's forced to put her down. Now his only reason for existence is to make sure he can provide the heroes with some decent weapons and armor.
    • Leah. What the poor girl goes through even before being made the vessel of Diablo himself by her own mother is enough to make you want to hold her and tell her everything will be all right.
    • King Leoric, at least before he was the Skeleton King. The last of his journal entries before becoming the Skeleton King reveals that his corruption was not one he did willingly. Rather, he confides in the journal that dark thoughts invade his mind but most significantly, he often finds that he can't control his own body and actions. Only a select handful of people know this; to the outside world, King Leoric is a monster.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Some fans argue that Leah died way too early to truly get invested in her character, and that the game didn't develop her enough regarding her origins as the daughter of Adria and Aidan/Diablo.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Deckard Cain's death could have been a real tearjerker given how he's been the longest lasted NPC throughout the Diablo games. However, his poorly executed final scene left a lot to be desired.
    • Minor, but when you start facing Azmodan's forces, you first face a Lord of Gluttony boss. Then you have to deal with a Maiden of Lust. The Enchantress confirms that, as the Lord of Sin, Azmodan commands demons for each of the Seven Deadly Sins, but Envy, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, and Pride are no-shows.
  • Ugly Cute: Many of the pets are these, such as the Living Gauntlet who serves as the cutest and friendliest Floormaster ever, Buddy the hound whose favorite pastime is "Fetch the Skull", and even a "baby' version of the Butcher! All of which are non-combatants who simply follow you and collect gold for you.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Lysa in Reaper of Souls. She was always jealous of Eirena and how everyone would fawn over her despite her own magical skills being exemplary, and when it seems like she's finally going to get recognition and love from the Prophet, he orders her to essentially kill herself to give more power to the woman she's always been in the shadow of. When you fight her, she's less like a demon worshipping traitor like Adria was, and more like a terrified, desperate girl whose desperate desire not to die and actually be noticed drove her to the demons' side. Even Eirena sympathizes with her.
  • Woobie Species: Ultimately humanity, formerly known as the Nephalem. Offspring of renegade angels and demons, the Nephalem were more powerful that either angels or demons combined. Unfortunately it was this reason, as well as the retribution that would come if the High Heavens and Burning Hells discovered this blasphemous co-mingling, that prompted the renegades (including the top angel Inarius, who would have been the father of the Nephalem) to call for their extinction. When the demon Lilith came to their aid and slaughtered the renegades, Inarius took his former lover and banished her to the void. Then he attuned the Worldstone (the main setting of the series) and proceeded to leech away his progeny's power until they became weaker and weaker through each generation, eventually becoming mortal humans. And of course it doesn't end there. When Lilith finally makes it back from the void, she tricks a human by framing him for the murder of two emissaries working for the Cathedral of Light and the Triune (both of whom were secretly led by the Prime Evils and Inarius to lure humanity to their side) and then, while disguised encouraged him to gather an army of Nephalem to fight the injustice of their oppression. When the ruse is revealed, she sends her human pawn near the Despair Event Horizon, and tries to use the nephalem army to crush all opposition. If you take this in another perspective, Lilith, the lone demon responsible for saving the nephalem from extinction, is now using them as puppets for the sake of gaining power. And to put even more blocks of salt into the wound, when the angels discovered Nephalem and their world, they made a vote on whether or not to eliminate all mankind. Only one angel saved them from extinction, and he would be responsible for giving power back to the human heroes leading to them ending the Great Conflict and saving Heaven and the mortal realm from destruction.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/DiabloIII