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YMMV: Batman & Robin
  • Accidental Innuendo: Any time Bruce Wayne calls his sidekick "Dick", but the crowning example is probably "She's trying to kill you, Dick." Given how Clooney delivers the line, it might not be that accidental.
  • Awesome Music: Whatever other flaws the movie may have, it used the bombing-awesome theme song introduced in Forever.
    • Plus, the pop soundtrack is really good (even if the vastly superior remix to R. Kelly's "Gotham City" is left out) in a "Why tie this music to this movie?" sense.
  • Broken Aesop: Notice that the subplot of Batman not trusting Robin is resolved without Batman ever learning his lesson to trust Robin.
  • Cliché Storm: This film pulls out numerous cliches of superhero films of its time.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Poison Ivy of course.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: All of them.
  • Fetish Retardant: The Bat-Nipples and Bat-Butts. Brain Bleach may be required after viewing.
    • When Uma Thurman's Poisony Ivy dresses like this, she's hot. But like THIS? Nooooot so much. And she looks like that for most of the movie!
    • Also, the dead, open-eyed face Poison Ivy always makes when she kisses her victims is a notable turn-off when it should be the opposite (before the guy dies anyway).
    • Also, Poison Ivy's first evil entrance has her dancing erotically in a gorilla suit before revealing herself.
      Robin: "Gorilla my dreams..."
      • This may be a Shout-Out to, of all things, Marlene Dietrich in the movie Blonde Venus, in which she does the same thing.
  • Fight Scene Failure: Batman uses the Force Kick technique on one of Mr. Freeze's henchman in the fight for the Wayne Diamonds.
  • Genre Turning Point: Superhero movies as a whole became a lot less campy after this came out.
  • Ham and Cheese: Arnold Schwarzenegger and Uma Thurman.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Alfred almost dying really hits home when actor Michael Gough passed away.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: When Ivy, in her guise as Pamela Isley, is about to kiss (and kill) Commissioner Gordon, she stops and tells him "On second thought, you're way too old for me." At one point in her life, Uma Thurman was married to Gary Oldman, who portrays the younger Gordon during his early career in Christopher Nolan's Batman series.
    • In this film, Arnold Schwarzenegger tries to kill Batman. In Terminator Salvation, he gets a second chance to kill Batman again.
  • Hollywood Homely: Pamela Isley is "ugly" before becoming Poison Ivy because she has glasses, a ponytail and frumpy clothes, all of which disappear when she is turns into Poison Ivy, who looks and sounds more like a reject from a drag show than a "hot chick". This is all the more remarkable considering she is played by Uma Thurman.
  • Hollywood Pudgy: While the film averts this by never pointing it out, Alicia Silverstone had noticeably put on weight since her fame peaked, and the press had a field day with it at the time of the film's release.
    • One article noted that Silverstone essentially refused to manage her weight whatsoever during the filming. Which is already a problem when you're shooting a movie and need continuity, but is rather more important when your character wears a skintight bodysuit (that apparently had to be almost completely redone several times to accommodate her).
  • Ho Yay: Undertones of it are pretty much undeniable between the title characters. Supposedly, George Clooney retroactively claims he played Batman as gay (although it seems more of a Take That against said undertones than anything with truth in it).
    Dick Grayson: You're just saying that so I can't kiss her, is that it?
    Bruce Wayne: Listen, Dick, it's a poisonous kiss.
    Dick Grayson: A poisonous kiss? You don't understand. She understands how I feel.
    Bruce Wayne: She has clouded your mind and you're not thinking straight.
    Dick Grayson: I am thinking straight. For the first time in a long time.
    • Got to the point that Clooney and O'Donnell were actually nominated for the Razzie for Worst Onscreen Couple.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: The villains, Arnold's Mr Freeze and Uma Thurman's Poison Ivy, are commonly regarded as the only reasons to watch the movie, if not the only good thing on it.
  • Magnificent Bitch: Poison Ivy tries her hand at this. Keyword: TRIES.
  • Memetic Mutation: "YOU LIE!!!"
    • Pretty much anything that Schwarzenegger says, due to the sheer lameness of his puns.
      • As a subset of this, it's taken as a given that any mention of the movie whatsoever (or at times mention of Schwarzenegger by himself) will require at least ten posts of ice puns before any other discussion can happen.
    • The Bat Credit Card.
  • Mis-blamed: Many of the elements people disliked about the film were the result of Executive Meddling and not Joel Schumacher's fault. Bane's characterization wasn't written by Schumacker, and the decision to include him came after DC pressured Warner Brothers to include him in the film. (Bane had just debuted in the comics in a controversial story line the year before, and DC thought being in the movie would help him look better with fans.) The Batnipples weren't his call, neither were any of the hated costumes. The campier direction in general came from someone in the Warner Bros. marketing department noticing that Batman Forever had sold more childrens' toys than either of the Burton films, so there was pressure to mover further away from the dark tones those movies set, and include more costumes, vehicles and characters. (This was also why Batman had a one-seater car and Robin had a separate motorcycle.)
    • The film is often Mis-blamed for derailing Chris O'Donnell's career. In reality (while he does consider it a career low), he took temporary retirement because he had recently become engaged / married and wished to start a family (he now has five kids). His Career Resurrection as the lead of one of TV's highest-rated shows, NCIS: Los Angeles, has made him arguably more popular than he was in the late 90s.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Poison Ivy crosses it with attempted murder out of pure jealousy. To further rub salt into the wound, she then lies to Mr. Freeze about Nora's fate. When Mr. Freeze finds out who really pulled the plug, he's not very happy.
  • Never Live It Down: Joel Schumacher has been forever associated with this film and while he's still working (his biggest effort since is the movie version of The Phantom of the Opera musical), despite his strong resume before the Batman franchise he's more a B-list than A-list director now. He's also frequently Mis-blamed... um, even by himself, apparently, taking full responsibility in interviews for all of its problems ("If you don't like the movie, blame the director" he said at one point). By contrast, the screenwriter Akiva Goldsman had no setbacks at all and even went on to win an Oscar for his script for A Beautiful Mind. Producer Peter MacGregor-Scott is almost completely unknown despite arguably having more to do with the quality of the film than anyone else.
    • The combination of this film and the equally disastrous The Avengers (1998) knocked Uma Thurman back for a few years. She was eventually able to subvert this, but it took several years and the Kill Bill movies to do so.
      • This film, combined with Blast to the Past, is credited with killing the momentum of Alicia Silverstone, who was once one of the highest paid actresses in Hollywood.
      • Chris O'Donnell's career is also widely credited with tanking over this film. O'Donnell himself disputed this years later, noting that he deliberately started choosing smaller parts in order to focus on his family instead. He has, however, noted the film as a low point in his career and far, far more people remember this film than any other film he worked on (including the better-received Batman Forever where he played the exact same character).
  • One-Scene Wonder: John Glover as Jason Woodrue. He hams it up as much as anyone in the film, but still manages to be funny and a bit scary.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: The PlayStation got a sandbox-style action game published by Acclaim that was panned for crappy controls; it also featured obviously synthesized renditions of pieces from Elliot Goldenthal's score in the movie. A beat-em-up was also released for the portable Game.Com, and it fared similarly to its 32-bit counterpart with critics.
    • The PlayStation game received largely average reviews from the UK press; it was praised for its good graphics and innovative features, but criticized for its crappy controls and its counter-intuitive gameplay that led the player to aimlessly roam the city without knowing what to do or where to go next. Simply put, if the game was more focused, had simpler controls, and didn't try to cram adventure elements in the form of "clues", it would fare much better. It wasn't received as a great game by any means, but not as a lazy and poor licensed game either.
  • Snark Bait: Ripping on this film is pretty popular. Many snark sites have dedicated time to it. The film was also nominated for a whopping eleven Golden Raspberry Awards, including Worst Picture, though it only won for Worst Supporting Actress (Alicia Silverstone).
    • Its presence is all but guaranteed on a "worst Super Hero film ever" list, and makes more occasional cameos on generic "Worst Films Ever" lists as well. Cracked.com, however, used this movie's reputation to create a list of "five comic book movies way worse than Batman and Robin"— most of which are waaay more obscure than Batman and Robin.
    • Bane especially seems to be a good source of snark, especially when compared to the one played by Tom Hardy in The Dark Knight Rises.
  • So Bad, It's Good: For the sheer Narm Charm and semi-unintentional comedy value of the performances (especially Mr Freeze), as well as the somewhat poignant turn of Michael Gough's last and most fleshed-out turn as Alfred, this isn't a totally unwatchable movie. Gotham City is visually distinct and looks pretty damn good; the music is great; and its rep means that you pretty much have to see it even if you are obligated to make fun of it. Also, kids will probably still enjoy it (and to be "fair", they were the target audience). It also makes one hell of a trivia / Hilarious in Hindsight movie (eg. seeing Lionel Luthor as Jason Woodrue).
  • Special Effect Failure: There are several obvious bluescreen shots and lots of rubber icicles.
    • NONE of those effects compare to the fact that there are certain scenes in the movie that are just played backwards AND forwards.
  • Squick: Alfred had a Batsuit made for Barbara... in her exact, form-fitting measurements.
  • Took the Bad Film Seriously: Michael Gough, despite a very limited screen time, gives a genuinely heartwarming performance as a terminally ill Alfred Pennyworth. It is one of the few things about the movie that can be enjoyed at face value. It helps that he had goodwill built up from his presence in the previous three films.
  • Wangst: Robin seems to spend a good chunk of the movie complaining about something or other.
  • What The Hell, Casting Agency?: Arnold Schwarzenegger as Mr. Freeze. Schumacher wanted a man who looked like he was "chiseled out of ice," so Arnold was high on his list, but those with familiarity with the source character tend to have this reaction.
    • Most folks just assumed he was cast because he had a slightly similar accent to the character's portrayals in the Adam West TV series, or because the Freeze costume was so heavy, they needed someone they were sure could actually carry the damn thing.
    • A genre star, fresh off the successful conclusion of his TV show, revealed in an interview that he was such a fan that he would do Mr. Freeze for scale. The casting agency evidently didn't buy Patrick Stewart as a superhero.
  • What The Hell, Costuming Department?: The Batnipples are this trope's poster child. Some like to jokingly deride the Double Standard at play when Batgirl's costume sports none.

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