Web Video: History of Power Rangers

The History of Power Rangers is a web series created by Linkara of Atop the Fourth Wall as a fun side project. Being an older fan, he decided to review each season of Power Rangers and break down the elements of the story. It isn't a video review in the same style as most others on Channel Awesome, but largely Linkara doing a voiceover of the footage while pointing out elements and features he feels are noteworthy, with the occasional Fun with Subtitles or messing with the conventions of the format. The videos have grown in running time due to how complicated the series became later on (as well as his lack of familiarity with later series going in), between three and four parts pushes into 2 hours of commentary. He acknowledges that even with more time, there is likely to be something he forgets to mention.

The video series started in April of 2010 and, partially due to Linkara's own familiarity with the early seasons, the early videos came out fairly regularly. He knows how intimidating the project is and has made it clear (repeatedly) that there is no set schedule for the release of each installment as he also has to worry about his social life, his work on Atop the 4th Wall, conventions and crossovers with fellow reviewers on Channel Awesome (it started out about once a week, grew to about 3-4 months and the gap between Mystic Force and Overdrive was around a year and a half). And as he has not watched each season when it first aired, most of the later seasons have him reviewing it from a fresh perspective. Taking into account writing notes, selecting clips, editing, and doing the voice work, its a colossal task indeed. But one he does out of a labor of love for the franchise.

It must be noted that he is not reviewing the series based on how well it adapts Super Sentai. It would not only require him to watch the Sentai counterpart, but he also feels that any season should be able to stand on its own accord. He does seek to do research on various topics like the origin of the Sentai footage and behind-the-scenes material, but such information is not always reliable and he doesn't use it as hard fact. He brought this up during Mystic Force, as fans kept asking.

The following lists are the tropes he uses in each series review as well as tropes he points out that those series uses.

The most current review thus far is of Power Rangers Samurai. Megaforce is tentatively scheduled for December 24th 2015. There has been no announcement on if Linkara plans on reviewing Dino Charge or any future seasons after Megaforce, however.

This work provides examples of:

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     General 
  • Accentuate the Negative: Completely averted. Linkara praises things when done well, and points out things that are flawed, regardless of popular internet opinion and his own nostalgia. He's said incredibly positive things about some of the most divisive seasons and gives credit to the best aspects of every series, encouraging people to give all of them a chance. Even Turbo and Operation Overdrive's good moments are acknowledged, though he cracks the latter doesn't have a lot in that regard.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Linkara has issues with this, as whenever a character doesn't know about the Power Rangers, he points out that there was a full alien invasion of the Planet Earth. It's also notable, if coincidental, that he rarely likes a character who displays this in his analysis of the Season, although for any characters who displays this pre-In Space he tends to be slightly more lenient (less for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, citing then that the Rangers had been on National TV by this point).
  • Author Appeal: Linkara's fond of a few things which he brings up every now and then:
    • Considering his praise for the Time Force/Wild Force team up, Linkara likes it when we're told what the Rangers from last year have done since the villain was stopped.
    • Fight scenes that don't use many special effects (he derided the Kalish era for the infamous "Kalishplosions," and didn't really care for the Dino Thunder/Ninja Storm team-up fight due to it being a "special effects-fest"), and seasons that have good unmorphed fights.
      • Although he did say that the initial Dino Thunder/Ninja Storm fight reminded him of a superhero brawl, which he did enjoy. Given his other show, his appeal for this is quite evident.
    • Chivalry and the general "Ranger values" of being a good person and wanting to protect people and stand up to evil no matter what, even if you don't have any powers. This is why he likes characters like Chip from Mystic Force, is one reason why he gave Wild Force a bit more love than it usually got, and why he considers Bulk and Skull's character arc so awesome. It's also a big turn off for him when Rangers don't display these kinds of heroic qualities, disliking it when they act selfishly. For instance, in Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers Season 3, he alludes to this as a reason for disliking Operation Overdrive, and this is one of the reasons he doesn't care for Nick in Mystic Force. He also has a soft spot for chivalric villains (or the Noble Demon), as seen in Lost Galaxy and In Space.
    • Linkara is also a big fan of Arthurian Lore, as he shared a good first impression of Lost Galaxy when the Rangers gain their powers by pulling the Quasar Sabers out of a huge stone slab on the planet Miranoi.
  • Autobots, Rock Out!: Or as he calls it, "The Wasserman Factor"; playing epic music, particularly the theme song of the season, over fights and other cool moments makes them more epic, and it bugs him when they don't do it for no reason. As part of The Wasserman Factor, he also notes a season can be that much weaker if the theme music is bad, such as with Mystic Force.
  • Awesomeness Is Volatile: Linkara's theory for why the Rangers give off sparks when they hit something and why there are explosions behind them after they morph during the team-ups—there's just so much energy being given off.
  • Awesome Music: invoked One thing that is consistent in every review is addressing the quality of the opening theme, even above the Zords themselves (which he says kind of blur together). If the music is decent he tends to be more lenient on its quality.
  • Berserk Button:
    • He hates it when child actors are prominent, since they usually aren't very good actors and distract from the Rangers and/or the action. Linkara notes the very idea of a Kid-Appeal Character isn't needed for a show like Power Rangers; kids are watching the show in the first place for the fight scenes and the giant robots, you don't need to pander to them further.
    • Linkara also hates when characters don't act the way they should in their roles or have an Informed Attribute that they never actually portray. This includes Power Rangers who don't act heroic, enemies who say they have a code of ethics or chivalry and either never actually act that way or confuse stupidity with nobility (like not killing an enemy in a fair fight because 'it's not noble'), and mentors who don't actually help their Rangers and confuse fortune cookie rhetoric for insight.
  • Breakout Character: Carter Grayson is one of the most mentioned characters in the post-Lightspeed reviews and is likely one of Linkara's favorite rangers.
  • Catch Phrase: "...which makes sense" when a detail makes sense, despite at first looking like a Plot Hole.
    • As well as "...for some reason" a few times, when a detail doesn't make sense.
      • He also uses "Because... Because." in some cases.
      • As well as "Because... I have no idea."
    • Also, "I'm sure [villain] will neeeeeeever bother anyone again", for the villains who eventually come back. (He used a variation of this when Trent first appeared in Dino Thunder.)
    • He introduces the team-up morphs with, "And, of course, it's time."
    • "Which means it's AWESOME!" When describing the various weapons and equipment used by the season du jour's Sixth Ranger, usually a melee weapon that becomes a gun.
    • He ends each teaser with a quip and some variation of "Welcome, friends, to [series name]."
  • Central Theme: Linkara tried to find one in each season at the start of the retrospective- The only exception is his review of Power Rangers Turbo. The closest he got for a theme was "Cars vs. Space Pirates in Submarines."
  • Cliff Hanger: When the seasons started to have multiple videos he usually ends each one with a bait to force you to continue to the next video, such as a teaser for the yearly team-up to be reviewed or some major shake-up in the story. He also ends each series by quoting the theme song of the next series.
  • Critical Backlashinvoked: Has this with several shows, particularly what fans call the "Disney Era," but so far the only seasons he's said he feels are bad are Turbo and Overdrive, though he admits he understands why some seasons get hate.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Particularly on the worse seasons, but he admits in Mystic Force that sometimes he even snarks on elements he enjoyed just for the sake of it.
  • Elite Mooks: Often is discussed on whether mooks really WERE Elite when a season had more than one type of mook. For some like Mystic Force, he sees no difference between multiples types, while others like SPD he feels does this much better with some of the elites even getting speaking lines and proving themselves more powerful than the others.
  • Ensemble Darkhorseinvoked: He frequently says that Bulk and Skull are "the real stars" of Power Rangers' Zordon era. Outside of the Zordon Era, we get Carter Grayson: The greatest badass ever.
    • He also sometimes goes into details about certain rangers that he likes over the rest of the team, so far having done Katie in Time Force, Cam in Ninja Storm, Chip in Mystic Force and RJ in Jungle Fury.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Has noted that Power Rangers has a tendency, especially in later seasons, to give their Evil Overlord the stereotypical super-deep, gravelly evil voice. He also notes that while he understands Power Rangers does this to try to make their main villain sound Badass, it usually makes them sound incredibly generic, instead.
  • Evolving Credits: Happens to the series itself, as with each new series that comes out, Linkara creates a new theme. The first theme lasted 11 seasons due to Samurai not having their Gold ranger yet, but following that he changed it after 2 and then 4 themes to keep up with the additional ranger season.
  • Executive Meddlinginvoked: While he won't hold it over a season just because it was made during the "Disney Era", he has mentioned several times over that Disney really didn't get the franchise's appeal and would constantly interfere to try and reduce the violence, cut its budget, and at one point even wanted to just directly dub a season of the Super Sentai instead of converting it into a proper Power Rangers season.
  • Follow the Leader: The series is extremely similar in style to the reviews of SF Debris. Linkara definitely knows about his existence, due to the fact that he asked for permission for the use of Under Pressure in a similar way that SF Debris did for In Space.
    • More than that—he's been known to point people toward SF Debris' "Doctor Who 101" video if they have questions about where to start watching.
    • In regards to Power Rangers, the fanbase has changed its opinion on several seasons, characters & aspects of the show following Linkara's retrospectives - for example, Carter Grayson used to be considered one of the more boring Red Rangers, but now has the reputation of a Memetic Badass.
  • Foreshadowing/Call Forward: Videos will sometimes contain hints or subtle comments as to his opinions of seasons he hasn't reviewed yet, and on other occasions Linkara often alludes to themes and ideas that he's going to discuss when he gets to a particular season in a future video, such as discussing the idea of a robot war happening in the Power Rangers universe in Operation Overdrive, two episodes prior to his RPM review.
  • Fridge Logic/Fridge Brilliance:invoked Regularly discusses these throughout the series, noting that some plot points that seem odd actually make sense when you think them over, while others make you tilt your head because they don't make sense.
  • Innocuously Important Episode: Linkara will use this trope a lot, normally pointing out at least one episode (if not more) in a season that, at first glace, appears to be pointless Filler only to show that it actually is quite important in fleshing out the setting, gives great Character Development, or ties in nicely to that season's Central Theme. This is also the reason why he has declined offers from fans to be told which episodes in a season are important and which ones he should skip, as he likes to decide himself whether an episode is substantial to the plot or skippable filler.
  • Long Runner: In part due to the Schedule Slip, but he noted with amusement in reviewing Samurai that it was the first season to premiere after he started The History of Power Rangers.
    • This is also discussed in the Samurai review as to how fans were inevitably disappointed by the show for several reasons, but his first being that as Power Rangers has been going on for so long, "Not every season is going to be good."
  • Merchandise-Driven: Repeatedly mocked when the Rangers get new equipment or vehicles, ostensibly so the toy side of the show can keep pumping out new merchandise for the kids to buy. However, by Power Rangers Samurai he's grown really sick of the overuse of this trope, calling the season out for adding a new weapon, new zord, or new costume variation pretty much every other episode.
  • MST3K Mantrainvoked: Mentions several times that in order for the show to work, the series must take place in an Alternate Universe where societal progress and the laws of the science are different. The first episode alone establishes the moon has a breathable atmosphere and manned spaceflight to it still occurs, so there are some things you just have to go with.
  • Narm Charminvoked: "It's Power Rangers, it's supposed to be cheesy."
    • Sometimes, he notes a series can get a bit too surreal.
  • No Hugging, No Kissing: He frequently expresses disappointment that the series avoided any such displays of affection (except for Kimberly/Tommy) with some sort of romance happening in nearly every season. Whenever there is some sort of heartfelt confession that should lead to a kiss but never does, he subtitles it "Kiss her you idiot!"
  • Nostalgia Filter: In effect from the first season of Mighty Morphin' through In Space (with the exception of Turbo), but out the window from Lost Galaxy and beyond, as Linkara explains that was when he officially stopped watching Power Rangers as a child.
  • Oscar Bait: There are particularly well-done moments either comically or dramatically that he lists with an "Oscar Clip" subtitle to indicate their quality.
  • Police Are Useless: Notes we rarely see police or military attempt to engage monsters or protect people, and in one episode from Mighty Morphin' we see that Angel Grove's police department has special regulations for dealing with monsters and the Power Rangers. However, when we finally do see military forces attempting to fight a monster, we see they're not very good at it, so presumably they know better and just let the Rangers handle it.
    • The exception of course being RPM, which due to a greater focus on the military and rangers working together avoids any direct Take That at least directly.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: Discussed, he likes when Power Rangers breaks off from Super Sentai and is willing to try its own plots and ideas rather than just adapt the sentai wholesale.
  • Recruit Teenagers with Attitude: He often discusses this trope in seasons where we see the Rangers specifically recruited for a larger operation, discussing why or why not it makes sense to recruit teenagers instead of military or government operatives. In Operation Overdrive in particular he goes on a rant about it when it's Lampshaded in-universe by one of the Rangers that with Hartford's money, he could hire an army to aid him instead of relying on four teenagers.
  • Running Gag: Several, including Serpentera's three AAA batteries and "This'll neeeeever be brought up/mentioned again".
    • Pointing out whenever someone denies the existence of the Power Rangers that there was a full scale alien invasion of Earth thwarted by the Power Rangers.
    • Comments a few times that the reason Zordon kept secrets from the rangers is because he's mad at them for breaking the zords.
    • Cracks about the Abandoned Warehouse District being the site of Megazord battles.
    • After Wild Force, always pointing fun at any claims that places are in the US by instead pointing out that all their filming is now in New Zealand.
    • Every time a Super Mode is introduced he analyzes the cosmetic appearance, sometimes positively, sometimes negatively, but often concludes with "At least it isn't glitter!" in reference to the underwhelming upgrade the Rangers got in the third season, which was literally a thick layer of glitter on top the suits.
  • The Scrappy:invoked He certainly sees various characters from the various seasons as this. People such as Lucas, Merrick, or Nick rub him in a wrong way, but one of his more hated Scrappies being Dax from Operation Overdrive, to the point that he said that the only way Jungle Fury could be worse than the previous seasons was if every ranger was replaced with Dax.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: Linkara points out the series' use of this trope since the franchise's beginning during the Jungle Fury review, stating that the forces of good seemed to not focus on permentally defeating evil, preferring to just lock Big Bads away and hope no one releases them.
  • Seasonal Rot: invoked He is pretty open when he feels a series is lackluster with serious problems that prevent it from being even just So Okay, It's Average. Turbo was blasted for the inconsistent tone and radical cast turnover, and the fact he couldn't identify a Central Theme. Wild Force had a poor Green Aesop, a mentor who was The Load and plot lines and story elements that just disappeared (such as the storybook narrator). Operation Overdrive had a plot that was lacking in many aspects along with a Ranger team who were rewarded for trying and not for actual accomplishments. Mystic Force had the Red Ranger lacking in personality or even real nobility. Samurai didn't bother to develop plot lines so they were either underdeveloped or lasted too long.
  • Self-Deprecation:
    • He's taken a few shots at himself and the fact he's doing this series.
    • He forgot to mention Titanus and Scorpina in his video for Season 1 of Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. He then chastised himself for Titanus when it's used again in the video for Season 3 of MMPR and took a potshot at himself about Scorpina in the Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers Reversioned video he posted for April Fools' Day.
  • Serious Business: Averted completely in every sense of the word. Linkara's a huge Power Rangers fan but he's also not afraid to make fun of the silly and goofy elements of the series as well as the plot holes and bad moments. He's also a good sport about parodies, saying that he loves most parodies of the Power Rangers, highlighting that his favourites are the College Humor sketch and the Animaniacs sketch "Super Strong Warner Siblings".
  • Shown Their Work: Though he isn't immune to error, Linkara clearly shows he's done his research and knows what went on behind the scenes during the series and how it affected things.
  • Squee: On Twitter, Lewis said he was "holding back an epic scream of delight" after he got a package from a fan that included not only an autographed picture of Christopher Khayman Lee (Andross from In Space), but also a letter from Lee in which he said he was a big fan of both HOPR and Atop the Fourth Wall, and a comic he had written himself.
  • So Okay, It's Averageinvoked: How he seems to feel about Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue, Power Rangers Ninja Storm, and Power Rangers Mystic Force.
  • Swiss Army Weapon: Loves swords (or any melee weapon for that matter) that turn into a gun/cannon, and will take the time to highlight any Ranger who uses such a weapon (normally, Linkara only gives passing mention to any of the Ranger's weapons). And for the record, this does not count Gunblades, which is a sword with a hilt shaped like a gun ... which is stupid.
  • The Tag: He ends each video with a particular funny, awesome (Carter Grayson blasting a monster at point-blank range) or moving scene. The most emotional one comes from Power Rangers in Space with a line from Zordon in the early seasons "The world is lucky to have you, and so am I. May the power protect you always."
  • The Teaser: He starts off each review with one of the sillier scenes from that season without any narration, which is acknowledging right from the get-go that there are some things you can expect from Power Rangers.
  • Theme Music Power-Up: Mentions several times that having the theme song playing in the background tends to make the moment in question seem much more epic.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Characterinvoked: During the character analysis Linkara will almost always point out at least two of the Rangers who were wasted during their season. One is usually a Ranger who gets no character growth because they were perfectly stable and relatively happy to start with (most commonly the Plucky Comic Relief Ranger or the Sixth Ranger), while the other gets passed over due to being Out of Focus, and just not getting a character arc or enough episodes centered around themselves to flesh them out (typically The Stoic Ranger or one of the two girl Rangers).
  • Unintentional Period Piece: invoked Sometimes he starts a video with a short, personal monologue about the behavior of the fans watching the videos and how it is actually affecting his enthusiasm for the project, or about recent events that are related to Power Rangers but not so much specifically this project. He admitted that this dates his videos to very specific time periods, and makes it outdated very swiftly.

    Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers 
  • Adults Are Useless: Linkara says that the teens of Angel Grove are the only people who do anything in this city in his season 2 review, especially during his rant about the baby carriage chase.
  • Breakout Character: "We now return to the Tommy Oliver show, featuring the Power Rangers"
  • Continuity Creep: Linkara discusses how this occurred over the course of the three seasons. The first season didn't really have much in the way of significant storylines, with the exception of things like the Green Ranger arc, with many of the episodes just being filler Monster of the Week stories, sometimes even contradicting prior continuity from episode to episode. By contrast, the third season had a lot more multi-parters and multi-episode storylines.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: The three-person windmill combination used to fend off the Putties in an early episode, amongst other weird plot points in early episodes.
  • First Installment Winsinvoked: He regularly compares other Sixth Ranger storylines to "Green With Evil" (though he of course admits that "Green With Evil"'s dialogue wasn't very good), and up to In Space, whenever a Ranger left the team, he compared it to "A Different Shade of Pink". He also mentions in another video that as cool as the Megazords can get, to him nothing will ever top the original.
  • Flat Character: Notes that the Rangers start off with distinct personalities, but Flanderization turns them into this. He focuses on Tommy so much because his character arc of going through losing and regaining his powers is the only personal storyline worth mentioning, and even later he admits Tommy ends up not having much personality outside of how he plays off the other Rangers. Later additions to the team likewise end up filling the roles they're given for the plots of the week.
  • Growing the Beardinvoked: He raves at length about how great the "Green With Evil" 5-parter was and how it upped the stakes, giving the Rangers a more formidable enemy in an enemy Ranger instead of a random Monster of the Week, how the Green Ranger damaging the Command Center and Zords made the story more intense, and the simple fact it was a five-part saga, something a lot of shows, especially kids shows, don't do. Additionally, the aftermath of the struggle introduced Tommy, who would become the focus of a running subplot concerning his powers and become the show's Breakout Character.
  • Hidden Depths: He mentions during his review of the second season that despite being bullies previously, Bulk and Skull showed admirable traits, pointing out when Bulk immediately gave chase when he saw an out of control baby carriage on his own initiative, and when he and Skull, after having the Rangers foil some of their past attempts at revealing their identities, stood up to a monster to save the heroes.
  • Knight of Cerebus: Discusses Zedd as having this effect — he's not only much more imposing than Rita, but is clearly more powerful when it comes to his spells, and is more intelligent and calculating, trying to split the Rangers up and using their day-to-day activities to inspire monster ideas, often transforming a personal item of theirs into a monster to give the Rangers an emotional stake in the battle.
  • Let's See You Do Better: Linkara scoffs at the ridiculous outfits of Zedd's Psycho Rangers (which were basically the Putties' outfits, only colored), stating that he could make a more convincing outfit.
    • Those who watch the storyline portions of Atop the Fourth Wall know that he most certainly can make more convincing, better outifts, as exemplified by the costume he made for Lord Vyce.
  • Magic Versus Science: Discussed and named as the main theme of the first few seasons — Rita and Zedd are magic-users who employ monsters with fantastical mystical appearances to fight the Rangers, who work from the high-tech futuristic Command Center and employ technological powers like the Morphers and Zords.
  • Moral Dissonance: As Bulk and Skull seek to discover the identities of the Rangers throughout season two, whenever they came close (video footage or plaster casts of their footprints) the Rangers would sabotage their findings. You can't blame them for wanting to keep their secret identities, but at this point they were becoming the bullies....in Linkara's mind anyways. Really the Rangers were just keeping Bulk and Skull from exposing their identities to EVERYONE.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Notes that Tommy had become this for a portion of the second season during the arc when Zedd focused on depleting his powers, with Tommy get more development at the expense of the rest of the team.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked: In his season 2 video, he says that a storyline of Bulk and Skull learning the Rangers' identities and having to cover for them would be great as the duo would get Character Development, having to clean up their messes when the rangers get the glory. A step further would be them finding themselves to be jerks and not doing anything worthwhile with their lives.
    • Also notes this about the Dark Rangers, in addition to their stupid costumes, we don't get to see them do anything and the teens that Zedd planned to turn into the Dark Rangers are never seen again.
  • Took a Level in Badass: See Villain Decay
  • Villain Decay: He counters the complaints about Lord Zedd becoming ineffectual after marrying Rita by concisely explaining that Zedd had become no more dangerous than Rita, falling into the same rut of every plan. The only partial victory before he married Rita was draining the Green Ranger powers, but after the marriage, they destroyed the Thunder Zords, nearly killed Kimberly, disabled the Ninja Zords, destroyed the Ninja Coins, and even the Command Center.
  • X Meets Y: On the look of Lord Zedd, "Just look at this guy—this is what H.R. Giger would create if he wanted to make a supervillain!"

    Power Rangers Zeo 
  • Clueless Mystery: What he criticizes the Gold Ranger arc turning out to be, see The Reveal below, bringing up all the hints proved pointless.
  • "Dear John" Letter: Annoyed that this is how Kimberly breaks up with Tommy, even referencing it again later in Dino Thunder.
  • Evil Versus Evil: Zedd and Rita vs the Machine Empire
  • Informed Ability: The Cogs were supposedly unrelenting and "must be completely dismantled to be defeated", suggesting they were more dangerous than the previous set of Mooks, but they were disabled in basically the same fashion as everything else... punching and kicking them a lot.
  • Magic Versus Science: As with the first three seasons of Mighty Morphin, Linkara discusses the effect of this trope here, too. In this case, however, it's been exchanged for the idea of balance between the two concepts, with the Rangers' powers being more mystical in nature and enhanced with technology, while the enemies are a technological alien empire and the magic users Rita and Zedd.
  • The Reveal: Despite early indications of it being someone the Rangers knew, the Gold Ranger ended up being someone nobody knew or had even heard of up to that point (Trey of Triforia), which he admits disappointment over.
    • On the other hand, the identity of the guy to take over the Gold Ranger powers being revealed as Jason was praised for being such an unexpected twist.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked: He was disappointed with the Machine Empire sticking with the same Monster of the Week plans we saw before and not launching any full-scale invasions, especially since he brings up that what we see of it is visually very impressive with numerous robot servants and giant Walking Tanks.
  • Villain Decay: Notes the Machine Empire falls into this, despite the initial build up about them, the fact that they stick the same plans that Rita and Zedd did and continuously fail to defeat the rangers, he even admits that Rita mocking them and saying that they're a joke is pretty much true by the finale.

    Power Rangers Turbo 
  • Actually Pretty Funny: The phone call between Divatox and Rita.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: Goes on a massive rant about every problem Turbo has at the mid-point; the experienced rangers giving their morphers to untested rookies (though arguably the Millennium Message is more the cause of this), Divatox's complete failure as a villain, and the cars coming out of nowhere, he finishes with "and we have a police lieutenant running a frigging juice bar!"
    Rita Repulsa: I HAVE A HEADACHE!
    • Also, the reasons why he doesn't consider "Scorpion Rain" as canon: "1. The movie was never completed. 2. It wouldn't have answered all of the questions raised. 3. It was not conceived by the at-the-time production team. And 4. It probably wouldn't have been that good anyway."
  • Angrish: He was forced to take a brief break to scream in anger when the Rangers were cooked into a pizza. While we never actually see him, a Skyward Scream seems likely.
  • Bait and Switch: While perhaps not intentional, the way the clips are edited in the teaser, along with the music, makes Turbo seem like a maelstrom of epicness capable of curing world hunger, only for Linkara to chime in when it's done:
    Linkara: Welcome, one and all, to Power Rangers Turbo... the season that almost ended the franchise.
    • Normally, the teaser takes a silly scene from the season being reviewed and Linkara will riff on it, but after that point he goes on to be very fair and overall positive towards the season. The fact that the first and so far only time Linkara has opened the episode with a teaser that makes the season look totally awesome (in contrast to established expectations) winds up being for the first season that Linkara openly dislikes makes it stand out even more.
  • Evil Is Petty: Is not fond of the fact that Divatox is this.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: His angsty scream after the "cooked into the pizza" incident.
  • Idiot Ball/Villain Ball: Contrasts Divatox's pettiness and incompetence (such as always setting her bombs to go off in an hour and that for the first half of the series, almost all her plans involved bombs) against the Machine Empire and Rita & Zed, who even if they started out that way, learned from their mistakes and became more effective.
    • Especially emphasized with a plan that involved her robbing a bank, when she's a space pirate. Earth currency is worthless offworld, so what was the point of that?
  • Replacement Scrappyinvoked: With the exception of T.J., he felt that none of the new Rangers were worthy to become Power Rangers, as T.J. was the only one who really embodied what a Ranger should be. Cassie was kind of selfish in the beginning, while Ashley and Carlos had little to no interaction with their predecessors to justify why they were chosen to be Rangers. It didn't help that in his introductory episode, Carlos showed that he had problems with teamwork.
    • Characterization Marches On: He didn't have any real problem with the new Rangers once they took over, and his In Space and Lost Galaxy reviews show he does grow to like the four new characters and how they evolve to become worthy Rangers who take their duties and responsibility seriously, but he outright states that they did not get good introductory episodes, and their initial incarnations don't befit the characters they become, especially Cassie.
  • Mood Whiplash: Notes the pilot suffered from this; Zordon leaving the rangers happens in the same episode where we have a fight with giant cars ramming each other.
    • In terms of villains, he considers Divatox one of these. He explains that, well... the first villain was Rita Repulsa, an Empress of Evil. The next Big Bad to show up was Lord Zedd, who was even more powerful, and was the "Emperor of Evil." The next villains after that were the Machine Empire, which was implied to be on a massive rampage throughout the cosmos, conquering star system after star system... and they were so powerful that the previous Big Bads were sent running to the M51 Galaxy. And then the new villain, Divatox came along, and... she's a space pirate in a submarine. It's a bit of a letdown from "Interstellar Empire."
    • In terms of the powers themselves, we went from ancient animals, to the abilities of the ninja, to a crystal explicitly stated to growing more powerful over time... to some sort of car-based powers with no explanation.
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: Notes this about Divatox, she's supposed to be a pirate and she keeps saying she's trying to Take Over the World, as opposed to "stealing things," like a pirate is supposed to.
  • The Scrappyinvoked:
    • He acknowledges the problems inherent with Justin, but found the character himself was well-written: observant, enthusiastic, and overall a valuable member of the team. What he took issue with was the premise itself: that young fans need a kid their own age, because it's impossible for boys to relate to people who aren't their age. This, of course, ignores the fact that fans never seemed to have any problem relating to the "teenagers with attitude" from the first three seasons. He does however, agree that plots revolving around Justin aren't very good, but that's not the same thing as him being a bad character, and was also amused to note that Justin seems like a Marty Stu simply because he was the only character who was actually written competently.
    • On the other hand, he seems to harbor particular dislike towards Alpha 5's replacement, Alpha 6. He also found Dimitria annoying for her schtick of presenting questions rather than answers, but admits she got better later on.
    • Likewise hated Divatox calling her "Rita-lite" and not liking the theme of her being a space pirate, feeling it wasn't as threatening as the previous villains, and doesn't even find her antics amusing.
    • Elgar, Divatox's Dragon. At one point he said that he "hates him more than he hates Divatox," which is really saying something. At no other point in the series (as of the production of Operation Overdrive) has he ever sounded so happy that a bad guy got killed as when the Z-Wave turned him to dust.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Admits while he's annoyed that Divatox is the one that defeats the Power Rangers, and the contradiction with how early shows implied that villains couldn't just break into the Command Center like in Turbo's finale, he does admit that in overall atmosphere, Turbo's finale is still pretty good.
  • Seasonal Rot: invoked The prior Ranger seasons had fairly strong themes regarding change, evolution, and victory, but almost from the beginning this season was plagued with a lack of explanation for the new powers, radical changes of characters, a step backward in villain quality, and overall no real theme or direction that the other seasons had.
    Linkara: [...] But this season?! It's... cars versus a space pirate in a submarine, and then later a giant rubber band ball! I don't get it!
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Characterinvoked: Linkara considers General Havoc this. He points out that General Havoc is competent, calculating, and took his defeats without whining about them, unlike Divatox, and states that he believes Havoc would've made for a far better Big Bad than her.
  • Vindicated by Historyinvoked: Zigzagged trope. While he still isn't all that fond of Turbo, he admits when he finally comes upon his actual least favorite season of the show (Operation Overdrive), that Turbo did have parts that he liked, such as the season finale, the music and the fight scenes.
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?: Heroic example in this when Storm Blaster and Lightning Cruiser show up to help the rangers when the Power Chamber is attacked in the finale. He notes that they could easily stop the army of Piranatrons by keeping their distance and shooting them, especially since Lightning Cruiser can fly, and questions why they don't just RUN THEM OVER.

    Power Rangers In Space 
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles do not believe in the Power Rangers, claiming that they are "Pretend" and "Imaginary." Barring the fact that Angel Grove has monster-preparedness drills and evacuation plans, and that the rangers had been on TV before, or that monster attacks frequently made the news, the point is again made: These are Teenaged Mutated reptiles who train in the art of ninjitsu.
  • Free-Range Children: Notes the Early Installment Weirdness of the writers of the show trying to create plotlines revolving around the Rangers still being in High School, since the Rangers were also shown being very busy in their duties as Rangers and trying to locate Zordon. He even questions outright on where their parents think they are since they are obviously not going home. That being said, he was glad when the show just dropped the High School thing altogether partway through the season.
  • Human Aliens: Linkara finds it weird that Andros is an alien from KO-35 that just so happens to be human (for the record, Andros says outright he's human, not an alien species like Trey from Triforia or the Aquitians who look mostly human but clearly have different biology).
  • I Am Spartacus: Rarely does Linkara show full scenes seriously, but he features Bulk and Skull's shining moment in its entirety.
  • The Chessmaster: Notes that Astronema is easily the most competent villain up to this point in the franchise, avoided the same petty plans that other villains did and kept her eye either on defeating the rangers or causing destruction.
  • Plot Parallel: He describes how the episode "Wasp With a Heart" is essentially Astronema's story arc told in one episode.
  • Psycho Rangers: Is very pleased to see the Trope Namers that finally gave us a team of evil power rangers that weren't just random villains.
  • Put on a Bus: Notes that after Lightning Cruiser and Storm Blaster are saved by the Rangers they just disappear and are never heard from again, even though they likely would have been very useful to keep around.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heapinvoked: While Linkara wasn't nearly as hateful towards Justin as regular fans, he admitted that "True Blue to the Rescue", Justin's last appearance in the franchise, was an excellent episode showcasing all the good points of the character while also resolving hanging elements from Turbo.
    • He is also happy with the new voice chip and personality given to Alpha 6, considering the change an improvement over the annoying faux jive-talk of the previous season.
  • Take That: Multiple times to Elgar. He replays the scene where the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles kick him out of the way multiple times while laughing and crowing "That's for Zordon's energy tube, you cone-headed freak!"
  • The Untwistinvoked: Notes that Astronema being Karone is pretty obvious by the time it's revealed.
  • What Could Have Beeninvoked: Talks about how this season (and the next one, for that matter) planned on finally resolving the mystery regarding the Phantom Ranger, but that the story arc had to be scrapped.
  • Win Back the Crowd: invoked After noting Turbo almost killed a struggling franchise, In Space was planned to be the Grand Finale to the series. But it was just so grand it brought the fans back in droves, and the series continued on. This isn't actually correct though.

    Power Rangers Lost Galaxy 
  • Accidentally Accurateinvoked: Linkara states that he doesn't consider the Magna Defender to be an actual ranger, and instead thinks of him as an extra character. This perfectly matches the status of the Black Knight from Gingaman, who is considered to be an extra hero associated with the Gingamen rather than a full-fledged sixth ranger.
  • Alas, Poor Villain: Admits that scene with Trakeena watching Scorpious die manages to be a good Tear Jerker despite Scorpious mostly being a generic villain.
    Linkara: "[...] it almost makes you forget that one of them is wearing a bug on her head and the other is a tentacle hentai monster..."
  • Angst? What Angst?invoked: One issue he takes with Maya's character. She barely reacts to her home world being turned to stone from that point on. Not that Linkara thinks there's anything wrong with having an upbeat personality, but it comes off as being in denial of what happened to her planet rather than someone who just managed to move on with a positive outlook following a tragedy.
  • Arc Fatigueinvoked: Has this feeling about the Lights of Orion arc, feeling that it went on too long and was only saved by the presence of the Magna Defender.
  • Bizarre Human Biology: After Karone's tears heal a man she previously turned to stone (and after Andros's tears healed Karone in In Space), Linkara just gives up trying to rationalize it and just assumes all humans from KO-35, in addition to telekinesis, have magic healing tears.
  • Cannon Fodder: Dislikes the Stingwingers, not only for their uninteresting design and lack of personality, but also because they were completely ineffective. Even the Piranhatrons could be a threat in a large group, whereas Stingwingers always died in droves. The only time the Stingwingers were even kind of effective were when they had bombs strapped to their chests, but even then Linkara points out the Galaxy Rangers tanked a few of their explosions with little damage.
  • Didn't See That Coming: Kendrix's death. Complete with a brief shot of his reaction.
  • Evil Virtues: He notes that the season's theme was virtuous villains.
  • He's Back: As mentioned directly above, Linkara rarely shows entire scenes, but decides to do so due to the sheer epic of the Psycho Rangers return.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: invoked Karone becoming the Pink Ranger was mirrored with Astronema's statement in the previous season "I wouldn't want to be a Power Ranger anyway!"
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: Praises that even though Captain Mutiny is a Generic Doomsday Villain, he, unlike Divatox, he is actually a subversion is the trope and acts like an actual pirate.
  • Plot Hole: Linkara does point out the fact that Scorpius and his minions somehow avoided destruction at the hands of Zordon's energy wave with no explanation, but just assumes these particular evil forces were outside of the wave's effects.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: Notes that this is the reason for Kendrix's Heroic Sacrifice; her actress was diagnosed with leukemia and had to leave the show to undergo treatment (she got better, and is currently still alive; she wanted to come back for the 20th anniversary, but couldn't sort out arrangements to look after her children, which is Heartwarming in itself.).
  • Sixth Ranger: Discussed- Linkara, like some fans, doesn't see the Magna Defender as a full Sixth Ranger.
  • Special Effect Failureinvoked: Continuously refers to the planet of Miranoi and its people being turned to stone as an "Adobe Photoshop Filter" due to how poor the effect looks.
  • Stunned Silence: His response to Kendrix's death.
  • Training Montage: Trakeena's training sequence, along with "You're the Best" from The Karate Kid playing, as he said that it was just "begging to be supplied with an 80's song."
  • Troubled Productioninvoked: Makes a note that the series was apparently a nightmare behind the scenes, particularly around the Lights Of Orion Saga. Episodes and scripts were apparently struggling to reach completion in time for the show to go to air on schedule.
  • What Could Have Beeninvoked:
    • Notes that it was originally planned to have Cassie taking Kendrix's place.
    • Also says that many ideas were thrown around at the beginning with the writers about just what would happen; one of the big ideas was that the whole show would take place in the "Lost Galaxy," which would have justified the title of the series better.

    Power Rangers Lightspeed Rescue 
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: The lady in the Lost Galaxy Crossover: "There is no such thing as monsters," who got the award for "Dumbest Person in Power Rangers EVER".
    • Specifically, the woman claimed this in the first series in the franchise where the rangers are publicly known figures, have no secret identities, and frequently fight monsters out in the open. Oh, and this also happened in the team-up episode, where it's made clear that this season is canon with all previous ones- including the one where aliens nearly took over the entire planet were it not for the Rangers' intervention.
  • Awesome McCoolName: The Omega Megazord, "which is the COOLEST name for a Megazord EVER!"
  • Continuity Nod: Calls back to In Space when he jokes that Lightspeed's Humvee is actually Tankenstein.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: His main problem with the series, the villains aren't very interesting.
  • Memetic Badass: Carter Grayson. The Tag shows Carter shooting a monster at close range with two BFGs and the resulting explosion takes out a shipping yard, with the subtitle "The Lesson: Don't Screw with Carter Grayson." He refers to this in later videos as well. invoked
  • Merchandise-Driven: Like many seasons, he points out that the Rangers get new weapons(/toys to sell to kids) every other episode ... but says it makes sense in this particular series. These Power Rangers were created by a military institution, so it's logical they would continue to develop new weapons on a regular basis for the Rangers.
  • Revisiting the Roots: After two seasons of space odysseys, Lightspeed Rescue felt very reminiscent of Mighty Morphin' especially in its return to Magic Versus Science as a major theme, and the Sixth Ranger saga feeling a lot like "Green With Evil" (but in a good way).
  • The Scrappyinvoked: States that the villains of the season weren't all that interesting, but he loathes Vypra the most because of the actress' terrible performance.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: His main criticism of the "Trakeena's Revenge" teamup, the episode focuses mostly on the little girl whose parents were kidnapped and not the rangers.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked: He shows disappointment that no one tries to fix the problems with the Robot Rangers to provide backup, even though that would have been a pretty good idea.
  • What Could Have Beeninvoked: Claims to have heard this season was originally going to be another space opera like In Space and Lost Galaxy, but for one reason or another was changed to take place back on Earth, instead.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle: Carter's "Thumbs up" victory pose being interrupted by a not quite defeated Bansheera was a deliberate Call Back to Lost Galaxy, when that was the end of the fight.

    Power Rangers Time Force 
  • Anti-Climax Bossinvoked: Notes this about the end of the teamup, the rangers just fire a bunch of weapons and kill Vypra and her monster.
  • Anti-Villain: He discusses fandom's perception of Ransik as this. It's pointed out that Ransik himself was not that sympathetic; he has a sympathetic backstory, but his general actions in the main story were awful. Most of Ransik's claims of mutant oppression didn't hold up in all the various flashbacks, after being attacked by his own kind and rescued by a human (and repaying said kindness with hatred). Still, he is shown to care for Nadira, and that is what fueled his eventual redemption.
  • Character Derailmentinvoked: Despite being a well-written season overall, Linkara notes several characters change with no explanation. Eric starts off as being cold and rude, but mellows out towards the other Rangers halfway through the season for some unknown reason, Alex was a heroic Red Ranger when the season started, but then turned into a "douche-nozzle" when he came back from the future, and Katie spends one episode paralyzed in fear that her actions in the past will alter the future and cause her to lose her family, but in a subsequent episode is sent back to the 1900's where she happily changes small things without worry.
  • Character Development: Admits that this is one of the series strong points.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Notes that this does help make Ransik more than a generic villain in that we see a bunch of moments where he does care about Nidara, noting the overall goofy filler when she has a crush on Lucas in which Ransik lets her see him rather than trying to kill him.
  • Hype Backlash: invoked
    • While he thought Time Force itself was a very good series, he didn't find the villain as sympathetic as everyone said.
    • The two-parter with the Rangers stuck in movie scenarios also didn't impress him much, including the reference to Vernon Wells' past role in Mad Max. He largely glossed it over, feeling it was just filler.
    • Time Force itself fell into this for Linkara- while he admitted it was a great season, the amount of hype he'd heard from fans made him concede that he still preferred In Space.
  • It Makes Sense in Context: At Power Morphicon 2010, actor Vernon Wells (who played Time Force Big Bad Ransik) called Lewis a jackass. Turns out it was totally innocuous and meant in jest—Lewis was doing his best to remain low-key and inconspicuous during a panel when his own cameraman pointed him out to everyone. After Wells asked about this, Lewis said he was not making a big deal out of who he (Lewis) was because he did not want to look like a jackass, to which Wells cheerfully replied "Okay, jackass, what's your question?"
  • Out of Order: The series made a conscious effort towards strong Character Development, where switching around character-based filler episodes disrupted Katie's development. One episode had her scared to do anything out of fear of changing the timeline while a later episode had her gleefully changing the past when transported to the early 1900's.
  • Shout-Out: Wes and Eric's escape from the clock tower while flying through the clock face and everything behind them blowing up came with "John McClane Eat Your Heart Out."
  • Show, Don't Tell: One of his biggest gripes with this season is that the Rangers are told that what they're doing in the year 2001 is severely altering the future, but they never actually show what those alterations are.
  • Sliding Scale of Free Will vs. Fate: Linkara identifies this as the Central Theme of Time Force, the Rangers fighting their fate as dictated by the future vs. the free will to make their own life choices. Although ... Linkara does point out this theme is a little flawed due to the season never revealing what the consequences from changing the future were, exactly.
  • Tragic Monster: While he doesn't consider Ransik sympathetic, he agrees that Frax is this.
  • Unintentionally Unsympatheticinvoked: Provides the page quote when he discusses Ransik, while he does have a sympathetic backstory, his actions and behavior undermine that sympathetic backstory, particularly him killing Dr. Fericks when Fericks was a humble scientist who saved Ransik's life out of the goodness of his heart. He does agree that Frax is a sympathetic villain, however.

    Power Rangers Wild Force 
  • Alternative Character Interpretationinvoked: He calls Animus, Big Good in giant robot form, an Eco-Terrorist who talks as though he wants to attack humans for harming the environment, and even if it is a Secret Test of Character, taking the Rangers's powers away pretty much dooms the Earth.
  • Anvilicious: invoked He was not impressed with the very heavy-handed environmental messages, and had no love for Animus as described above. However, it should be noted he only hated the Green Aesop for being heavy-handed in said Animus arc specifically, he says that otherwise the season wasn't too bad with it.
  • Arc Fatigueinvoked: While the Zen-Aku Arc really wasn't that long, it was just so repetitive (Zen-Aku defeats the Rangers and steals a Zord, and nothing is learned about the character) that he got bored with it, especially when compared to how dynamic his favorite Sixth Ranger Arc, "Green With Evil", was able to be despite being made at a time when kid's shows really didn't have multi-episode arcs.
  • Continuity Nod: While it serves as a stark contrast to the martial arts used by the other Rangers, he liked how Carter's unmorphed fight scene was largely just shooting the Cogs, as that was what Lightspeed Rescue was all about.
  • Critical Backlashinvoked: He said that, while inferior to Time Force, Wild Force was nowhere near as bad as the Internet said.
  • Crossover: While almost every season has a team up with the previous team, he specifically points to "Reinforcements From The Future" as the absolute best team up episode that he's seen thus far (as of Operation Overdrive), noting that not only were the fights excellent, the character interactions were great, music was superb (even commenting that the "horrible singing" that he had criticized Shayla for managed to sound pretty good once remixed), and most importantly, it continued the story of both Time Force and Wild Force.
  • Dawson Castinginvoked: While certainly not the only season to cast adult actors as teenagers (this is actually very common), Linkara notes that the actors in Wild Force looked about college-age, but the content seemed more suited for Rangers still in junior high, or even middle school.
  • Easily Forgiven: When Shayla tries to convince Dr. Viktor Adler/Master Org to stop being evil, she mentions that Cole already forgave Dr. Adler for murdering his parents ... seriously confusing Linkara since said forgiveness never happened (on-screen, anyway).
  • Edited for Syndicationinvoked: When the video was reposted on YouTube, the opening section addressing schedule-related complaints was removed, since it didn't stop people from pestering him about the schedule and the information was outdated anyway.
  • Executive Meddlinginvoked: Notes that this is what caused "Forever Red" to shorter, Disney not being interested in funding the episode that they only saw as just promoting a bunch of toys that weren't sold anymore, which sadly prevented a planned battle with a bunch of old Zords taking on Serpentera.
  • Hand Wave: Ransik being healed of his mutation made no sense, "But hey, I like a happy ending."
    • His answer to how Bulk and Skull were reunited is "SHUT UP AND DON'T QUESTION IT! BULK AND SKULL ARE BACK!"
  • Internal Homage: Even if unintentional, he loved the Wild Force Power Ranger suits (especially the helmets) for being very reminiscent of the original Mighty Morphin' suits.
  • It's What I Do: Of a sort. He actively wondered why he got so many people asking if he was going to cover "Forever Red" when such a thing is the very premise of the video series.
  • Kid-Appeal Character: Theorizes that Wild Force was made to appeal to really little kids, as the season was wrought with child actors (all of them terrible, in Linkara's opinion).
  • The Load: Shayla, who he rants does nothing besides getting kidnapped.
  • Mood Whiplash: While the Zen-Aku story arc had its faults, Linkara at least liked how serious the story felt ... until it was just suddenly concluded by the Rangers getting two new Zords with the power of soccer, complete with a badly rendered CG-soccer stadium.
  • The Magic Goes Away: Really annoyed by this ending. Shayla's But Now I Must Go didn't bother him so much but since, among other things, it means the Wild Force Rangers have so far never gotten their jackets and morphers back and it's entirely possible that none of them except Max and Danny ever saw each other again, he's still displeased about this while doing the next review. Whilst Power Rangers Megaforce would later show this wasn't the case, the Wild Force review was made several years before Megaforce began.
  • Mundane Made Awesome: Defies this belief when discussing the Growl Morphers appearing as cellphones, as he prefers the Morphers to be foreign, fantastic objects set apart from normal day-to-day technology, and designing them after cellphones robs them of that effect.
  • Needs More Love: invoked His general assessment; there are certain things that could be better, but overall, there's a lot to love in this season.
  • Rookie Red Ranger: Finds it odd that Cole is made the leader of the group since he's the newest member. Linkara also finds the explanation for this, that 'the lion is the king of the jungle and so Cole is the leader because his Zord is the lion', very unsatisfying.
  • The Scrappyinvoked: Lewis showed a special dislike for Animus/Kite, noted above, as he takes the Wildzords away thus leaving humans defenseless against the Orgs & ignoring that there are humans that try to help the environment to justify his actions, and also noting that his offer to go another world wasn't extended to Shayla, and that he's never called out on his actions. Linkara was especially frustrated that the rangers actually agreed with him that they weren't doing enough for the planet despite all their efforts to it keep safe from pollution, and that the rangers' devotion should not have needed to be tested when Animus revealed it was all a Secret Test of Character. He also points that Animus never took back what he said about humanity.
  • Shot for Shot Remake: Mentions the depths to which this happened, with the producer even bringing in japanese directors to work on the show to recreate it. In a case of Tropes Are Not Good, he mentions that this might have contributed to the lower quality acting due to some direction issues since many of the directors didn't even speak english.
  • Tranquil Fury: Linkara starts his review of Wild Force with this while addressing the overly demanding fan base of the series asking for the new episode.
  • Wangstinvoked: Feels this way about Merrick's constant need to distance himself from the other Rangers and seek 'atonement' for his actions as Zen-Aku, since not only have the Rangers and Shayla forgiven him from the start, but Linkara points out the fact it was quite obviously the Wolf Mask in the driver's seat, anyway, not Merrick.
  • What Could Have Beeninvoked: All the possibilities of what became "Forever Red" are outlined.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Calls out Merrick for playing pool with his Power Animal Crystals, which he says is just about the most disrespectful thing you could possibly do with them.

    Power Rangers Ninja Storm 
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Similar to Lightspeed Rescue, the first episode suggests that it is a Continuity Reboot unrelated to the past seasons, that Power Rangers were fictional or at most an urban legend. This season is eventually tied in to the rest of the franchise, so it seems like it's skepticism despite all of the monster attacks and alien invasions over the last decade.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: He later notes during Dino Thunder that though he considers Lothor an incompetent fool who engages in far too much comic relief, when he gets into a fight, he's a very powerful combatant.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Talks how the first episode actually failed in this. Linkara gets that the writers were trying to push the whole inexperienced thing for the three Rangers, but notes they pushed it too far especially in them messing up their first transformation sequence (when said transformations only consists of four words), which makes them come off as borderline incompetent, instead.
  • Franchise Original Sin: invoked Of a sort, he mentions his disapproval of Ranger "civilian powers" as it dilutes the need for morphing. But within this season (where the civilian powers started) the premise is of ninja students and thus having unusual abilities sort of works.
  • Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain: Considers Zurgane this, to a degree. He feels he's the only smart villain in the series and is Surrounded by Idiots, including his boss.
  • Mood Killer: States the show's humor, especially in "Samurai's Journey", could be this.
  • The Scrappyinvoked:
    • Was not a fan of Lothor and his group due to his frequent Breaking the Fourth Wall jokes and Mood Whiplash. He openly calls Lothor a "Male Divatox," and shows glee when Dino Thunder claims that the Thunder Rangers were the biggest threat that the Ninja Rangers, "Thus proving how worthless Lothor was as a villain." though he does admit Lothor was a impressive fighter in his Dino Thunder review and even compared him favorably to the villains of Mystic Force.
    • Linkara also shares a distaste for the Team's mentor, Sensei Kanoi Watanabe. In particular, he questions the generic "wise sayings" that Kanoi gives out as advice. He also remains confused as to how Kanoi was turned into a hamster in the first place (or how one of Lothor's blasts changed him back to human, for that matter).

    Power Rangers Dino Thunder 

  • Accidentally Accurate:invoked He refers to the Mooks of the series, the Tyrannodrones, as "the Sting Wingers' demonic cousins"; the Tyrannodrones actually did use modified Sting Winger costumes.
  • Anti-Climax: Admits this the show's main weakness, the conclusion to plots involving its villains tend to be very anti-climatic.
  • Alternative Character Interpretationinvoked: He interprets Tommy as having been driven to the point of Shell-Shocked Senior suffering from a massive identity crisis as a result of his near-decade of fighting evil, identifying himself more as a set of powers than as a person.
    • Fan Wankinvoked: He admits he might be looking too deep into the symbolism behind Tommy's mental battle with his past Ranger selves, but he feels it helps to explain a lot about the character and the whole event.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: He notes the "vision from the future" from the bonus Dino Thunder episode as one for SPD.
  • Evil Versus Evil: Lother vs Messogog in the "Thunder Storm" teamup, which he feels is better than the fight that occurred with the actual ranger teamup.
  • Fantastic Racism: Mentions that Mesogog was probably the first villain definitively motivated by this, adding to his quality as Big Bad. (Also notes that Ransik technically doesn't count since he seemed more concerned with power rather than actual racism.)
  • For Science!: Questions why Tommy was doing research into making cybernetic dinosaur clones "unless [you're] planning to become a supervillain." He later references the trope by name in a Call Back to Tommy in the Mystic Force review.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: invoked Notes that that Zordon's line back in MMPR's second season "Too much pink energy is dangerous", became this due to the white dino gem having problems from there being two rangers.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: He interprets Trent's vision of a superhero as being something like this, explaining that this can be one of the reasons for his refusal to receive help from the other Rangers.
  • Informed Ability: Linkara inadvertently demonstrates how the trope can become subjective if handled improperly. Trent's artwork is genuinely good and looks professional, but Haley gushes over them a bit too much.
    • He was also rather ambivalent towards Kira's musical talent and supposed "artistry", but also admits that it's probably just his taste in music being different.
  • Revenge Before Reason: Notes this as problem with Zeltrax's character, he doesn't really seem to have a reason for hating Tommy since he had nothing to do with the accident that almost killed him.
  • Take That: shows immediate love for Mesagog when one of his first lines is that his attack will be blamed on "That idiot, Lothor."
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: invoked With the White Ranger clone, who is just a Flat Character (he doesn't point out that he was created because the white ranger was a villain in most of Abaranger) that didn't do much and felt the plot with him could have been better, like if it had Trent lose his powers when the clone was made.
  • "World of Cardboard" Speech: Linkara's examination of "Fighting Spirit" really drives it home how important that lesson was to Tommy. Tommy has never given up at any point in his Ranger career, so it may seem like an empty Aesop, but going through several periods of gaining and losing powers may have created a level of existential crisis in that he isn't a hero without his powers. The Green Ranger has also almost always represented either regrets or mistakes as a Ranger, so having that Ranger form be his final confrontation was also very symbolic.
    • Bookends: On a non-symbolism note, it also serves as a nice Book End to his pre-Turbo Ranger duties, essentially going through his three longest Ranger forms in reverse.

    Power Rangers SPD 
  • Angrish: Complains that Gruum's dialogue often comes off as this and he has difficulty understanding it.
  • Dangerously Genre Savvy: Notes that despite being kind of dull in personality, Gruum is one of the most effective villains in the history of the franchise, distracting the Rangers with attacks in one area so he can steal something somewhere else, not being hesitant to get in the fight himself, controlling a powerful empire that has blown up planets, frequently getting away with his plans scot-free, and having an entire team of Rangers join his side by choice.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: Felt that this was a very good way to introduce the villains.
  • Face-Heel Turn: The A-Squad, he gives kudos to the writers for not overturning this. Feeling it was a great plot twist and a nice final challenge to the B-Squad to come into their own as true heroes, though he admits he's it's disappointing that we never learn much about The A-Squad or why they turned evil.
  • Fan Wankinvoked: Discussed, since SPD takes place in the future (and a specific year at that, 2025), and all the fan theories on timing and parentage are discussed, as well as an alternate theory that a timescale in Power Rangers is nearly impossible since the B-Squad's parents were apparently working in Time Force to make powers.
    • Wild Mass Guessing: He attempts to reconcile these issues by theorizing that the Power Rangers universe has different timing, in that a year is not the same length of time as in our universe (he puts the length of a PR year in the ballpark of 700-800 days). He notes that this could be just one of several other differences in the same vein as the moon having earth-like gravity and an atmosphere in the Power Rangers universe.
  • Fridge Horror: Invoked, he notes that speculation that if Sky's father was Wes means that Wes was killed by Murloc.
  • Hero of Another Story: How he views the A-Squad & B-Squad, noting that A-Squad are the best of the best and would normally be the characters the story followed, with B-Squad being the characters this would normally apply to.
  • Living Prop: As evidenced by his comments when summing up the Character Development for the season, he (Much like the SPD writers) seems to view Sam/Omega Ranger as this.
    "Sam... Has no Character Development. He's a ball of light. Moving on."
  • Only in It for the Money: Praises Broodwing for having this as his motivation, noting that it made a refreshing change to the other villains throughout the series, who have mostly had the same goals of conquering something.
  • Personality Powers: Does a very nice, in-depth look at why the Ranger's civilian powers match their personalities.
  • Ragtag Bunch of Misfits: Sees SPD as this kind of team done very well.
  • Shown Their Work: When talking about the "Kalishsplosions;" he notes that the person actually responsible for them was Koichi Sakamoto, though he still calls them "Kalishsplosions" since Bruce Kalish would have had to approve of such ideas, as well as the fact that they became particularly prominent in the Kalish era (They have since shown up in RPM and Samurai).
  • Static Character: Notes that Bridge doesn't have any significant Character Development compared to the rest of the team, but he didn't have any huge flaws to overcome in the first place and his general quirkiness is what made him appealing in the first place.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: Discussed extensively with "Kalishsplosions", and how this is actually very much an annoyance for its lack of creating suspense, and makes the Rangers look weak for being sent into the air by explosions behind them, which have logically missed them. Linkara also notes how it makes fight scenes BORING, by focusing on explosions instead of the martial arts of past seasons, making the point that you could splice together any random fight scenes & it would be hard to tell that they weren't from the same fight.
    • Plus the occasional shots of explosions off to the side, which make even less sense.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Characterinvoked: Comments that Mora is sadly underdeveloped, with the viewer never learning how Grumm found her, why she worked for him or why she hated being a grown up so much. Didn't help that her final fight in the finale was rushed and was the last we would see of her.

    Power Rangers Mystic Force 
  • Accidentally Accurateinvoked: Comments that he feels that the combining sequence for the Mystic Dragon and Titan Megazord feel like somebody fastfowarded the footage from Magiranger, which is exactly what happened.
  • A Day in the Limelight: One odd thing he notices is that the side characters have story arcs (major and minor), while the actual rangers themselves don't.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Linkara is annoyed by how Nick has trouble believing in magic at the beginning, especially seeing as how he'd seen Udonna use spells to fight Foot Soldiers by that point, not to mention that he's just observed his other companions transform into Power Rangers.
  • Badass Cape: Points out the addition of capes to the Rangers' outfits is the biggest change to the Mystic Force uniforms from past teams. Though he knows some fans dislike the idea, he approves of it, as it fits with the Power Rangers being superheroes, and the capes aren't long enough to get in the way but are still long enough to look regal and cool.
  • Compressed Vice: He points out how the humans and the forest creatures' distrust of each other only shows up at the very beginning and end of the series.
  • Critical Backlashinvoked: He notes that series is a huge Base Breaker and understands why fans dislike it, but states in his opinion, it isn't terrible and feels it's worth watching.
  • Executive Meddlinginvoked: He actually contacted Ron Wasserman (who'd previously done work for Atop the Fourth Wall) to get the real story about what happened with this show's theme song. Turns out Wasserman's original version, which is his typically epic work, was turned down because the producers wanted to hop on the rap bandwagon. Wasserman complied, but was quite unsatisfied with the result, and so were they, so they went with another composer. And then they chided Wasserman for putting his first version online, despite never creating a soundtrack album, so it's pretty clear their only problem with it was that he was exposing how stupid they were to reject it.
    • Likewise he mentions that Disney wanted to use more magic as they didn't like the frequent physical contact of the show...despite the fact they already had done four PR seasons doing this and should've known by now how action heavy the series was. Disney, the most kid friendly and smartest company around.
  • Flat Character: Thinks of the Rangers as this.
    • Also has this criticism towards the villains.
  • Honor Before Reason: Linkara's major criticism of Koragg: he talks a good game about being honorable, but he seems to define it more as being a horrible tactician than actually hewing to any chivalric code.
  • Fan Wankinvoked: Mentions that seeing the mystic creatures of the forest moving into civilization to live alongside humans probably contributed a lot to humans and aliens learning to get along easily in the backstory of SPD.
  • In Name Only: Linkara considers Mystic Force a fantasy story, a sadly generic one, that has Power Rangers in it, rather than a fantasy-themed Power Rangers series.
  • It's Been Done: His opinion on the Fallen Hero/Noble Demon aspect of Koragg is that previous villains such as Astronema, Merrick or Ryan did the storyline before, and not only that, they did it better.
  • The Load: Subverted, despite making jokes about Udonna getting kidnapped, he states she never felt like this.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Points out that this works against the season- due to only having 32 episodes, and spending too much time focusing on the side characters and the lore of the universe, the Rangers themselves don't have much to do.
  • The Scrappyinvoked: Does share the dislike for Nick, calls him out as a Designated Hero given that he's supposed to be the Chosen One even though he's no better than the rest of the team and is often the first one to quit when things get hard. He doesn't, however, mention the common criticism of Nick stealing the spotlight (For reasons mentioned below).
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Notes that the side characters have more focus than the rangers, aside from Nick.
  • Supporting Protagonist: Again with the exception of Nick, Linkara says this season is less a season of Power Rangers, and more a fantasy story that just so happens to have Power Rangers in it.
  • Take That: Compares the introduction to the four rangers, besides Nick, to an MTV reality TV show, and talks about the filming of one in progress as though it were a crime.
  • Unintentionally Unsympatheticinvoked: His opinion of Nick, who he even describes as an "arrogant, unsympathetic, overemotional douchebag." He initially feels the same about Leelee, who basically only had a Heel-Face Turn for selfish reasons, but redeems herself when she goes with Phineas and Claire to rescue Udonna.
  • The Untwist: Invoked with the identities of Udonna's long-lost husband & son; the same episode revealed Udonna's son was taken to the human world as a child, and that Nick is an orphan and his Orphan's Plot Trinket is the same blanket Udonna's son had in the flashback. Coupled with the revelation that Udonna's husband was an honorable warrior and a flashback of Koragg where we find out he used to be human, and it's very obvious where this storyline is going, even if it takes some time to get there.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Characterinvoked: Feels this way about Chip, whose desire to be a Knight in Shining Armor who actually embodies those traits unlike Koragg, what it meant to him could've been more explored.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked:
    • Notes this on a few things, with one of the main problems with the season being that the show didn't give the Rangers themselves enough focus, and the final two episodes had enough plot points that could have been fleshed out in place of some of the filler episodes.
    • Specifically laments the lack of an SPD team-up episode, since seeing the team of space cops from the year 2025 interacting with the team of wizards from 2006 could have made for plenty of great material due their contrasting themes, environments & philosophies. Especially frustrating when Piggy shows up in one episode living on the Earth long before the future timeline of SPD. The most we get from him is just foreshadowing of what went down in his series. He does however, admit that given that SPD is set in the future, that creating a setup for a team up would be more difficult than other shows.
      • Then again, "Dino Thunder" and "SPD" had the time gap as well, and they had two crossovers...
  • Tranquil Fury: While not on par with his speech in the Wild Force review, there was a definite edge in his voice when he was talking about people spoiling the surprise of the Mystic Mother's identity.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?invoked: Has this reaction to the voice of the Mystic Mother, more specifically the crew not getting Barbara Goodson back, given they'd revealed the Mystic Mother to be the reformed Rita Repulsa.

    Power Rangers Operation Overdrive 
  • Alternate Character Interpretationinvoked: Theorizes that Doctor Hartford, due to his familiarity with Zord and Morphing technology, as well as his personal wealth, may have helped with the various ranger groups in Lightspeed Rescue and SPD.
    • Fan Wank: Notes that if the above is true, then it's entirely possible that the robotics technology used to create Mack was descended from the "Robot Rangers" used in Lightspeed.
  • Calling Your Attacks: Perhaps the most plain confusing part of the series for him is that the Rangers do it with their blasters.
  • Continuity Snarl: Dissects how badly "Once A Ranger" distorted series continuity.
    • Thrax's existence is a big question mark. Though he offers the idea Zedd and Rita had and raised him during Turbo, that Thrax was sealed by the Sentinel Knight, who was sealed away centuries ago at least, ruins that idea.
    • Alpha 6 is boxed up in a warehouse in Angel Grove. Last we saw him, he was on Mirinoi at the end of Lost Galaxy.
    • Is utterly bewildered by the presence of the Veteran Rangers. Not only were several of them left without their powers at the end of their respective seasons, but Bridge is from S.P.D., meaning the Sentinel Knight pulled him through time to recruit him. And restoring the powers of several past Rangers and bending the space-time continuum to get one of them from the future was easier than calling up any number of past Rangers who still have their powers and live on Earth in the same time period?
    • Later, in part four, Linkara questions why the Rangers think Norg is Bigfoot and want to capture him so they'll be famous. Not only have they met Norg before and know who he is, but they've been on television by nature of being Power Rangers.
      • He also points out in Rose's character analysis section that the writers seemed to completely forget her personality and backstory and decided she only started to learn things to feel special (even though she was always a super genius), that being a super genius apparently didn't make her feel special or gifted, and later that she was ashamed of being smart. Even though her job was being a super smart college professor. Linkara figures the writers were paying zero attention to what they were doing by that point.
  • Designated Heroinvoked: Points out early on that the Rangers had to actually be told to save people from an erupting volcano rather than go after a villain, and that throughout the season the Rangers come off poorly as they don't lose this trait as the season goes on. Lewis has a field day when he gets to the "Once A Ranger" anniversary special, as the Overdrive Rangers decide to go back to their normal lives when they lose their powers; he responds by showing clips of Rangers from nearly every prior season deciding to do the right thing even though they no longer had their powers or otherwise had the odds heavily stacked against them, and explaining that a real hero doesn't do noble things because they have powers but rather that the powers are merely a tool to assist them as they do noble things.
  • Development Hellinvoked: 14 months and counting from the previous episode, although given his hatred for this season it is understandable why he would procrastinate. Having said that, he also had to wait until the DVDs came out due to being part of Saban's Power Force and them requesting that footage from legitimate sources be used for any future projects. In addition, he has other projects going on that keep him pretty busy as well; He's dedicated first and foremost to Atop The Fourth Wall (which as of this writing just released a new DVD and the Three Hundredth Episode)
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Notes that it was a Zig Zagged Trope for the season, as whilst Mack had earned his humanity through his Heroic Sacrifice in the final battle, Tyzonn doesn't have to do anything after finding out his long thought dead fiance was still alive as she's rescued by the comic relief villain & just turns up at the Hartford Mansion.
  • Ensemble Darkhorseinvoked: Spencer was the big saving grace of the series for him, with his (sometimes) clever disguises and genuinely witty lines.
  • Fanservice: Considers "Once A Ranger" an example of this done wrong, and an example of how fanservice alone isn't enough of a redeeming quality to save a bad episode or make it enjoyable. He even went on to explain how this can hurt an episode, by introducing multiple continuity snarls, create massive plot holes, or make the characters look worse (either by comparison, or by, say, showing that you left a fully-sentient and operational android trapped in a crate for years on end for literally no reason).
  • Foreshadowing:
    • After noting the premise of the Power Rangers fighting an army of machines hellbent on humanity's extiction sounds interesting, Lewis tells the viewer to hold on to that idea for a few seasons.
    • Shows several of the moments foreshadowing Mack's true origins as they appeared in the season, to show it wasn't a twist the writers pulled out of nowhere.
  • Nice Character, Mean Actorinvoked: Lewis brings up the Samuel Benta/Power Morphicon incident and doesn't have much nice to say about him. explanation  Although he wouldn't say that Will is a nice guy, as he still berates his various flaws (most of it on-par with the other Rangers of the series), he does note that of all the Overdrive Rangers, Will is the only Ranger to actually do anything to help people after the Rangers leave Operation Overdrive in "Once A Ranger" & return to their normal lives.
  • Plot Coupon: Most of the plot of the show revolves around the Rangers collecting random items that will help them find the jewels of the Corona Aurora. Lewis is quite happy to skip over most of these episodes because few if any of them have any real impact on the overall story, and most of these finds serve no purpose except to lead to the next episode's Plot Coupon, and perhaps eventually a jewel.
  • Recycled Scriptinvoked:
    • Comments that the pilot is similar to the pilot of Lightspeed Rescue, but if it had been done wrong. The main point Lewis makes is that whilst the Lightspeed Rangers had skills that made them feel like they were suited to the job, the Rangers Hartford recruited don't have such skills & thus they don't feel like they belong on a superhero team.
    • Lewis also notes that Mack's relationship with Hartford is similar to the one between Wes & Mr. Collins in Time Force, but rather than handling it gradually over the season, it's done in one episode.
  • Running Gag:
    • "You're rich, buy an army!"
    • "Shut up, [X]!"
  • The Scrappyinvoked:
    • Shares the fandom's dislike of Dax, noting that he is the character he hated the most from the season.
    • He overall considers the Overdrive team to be the worst Power Ranger team due to their incredibly selfish and moronic actions throughout the series. Most exemplified in "Once A Ranger".
  • Static Character: Accuses Ronnie & Dax of being this specifically, but notes that Mack gets most of the character development for the season.
  • invokedScrewed by the Network: Mentioned at the start of his Jungle Fury review that this was a factor in how the season turned out as the showrunners really were trying to give their all for the adaptation. But Disney was less then supportive, giving the show half its budget to really bring out its potential, and thus forcing them to cut costs and juggle the story the best they could with what they had. Heck one of the executives they pitched it to even suggested to just "dub" the entire sentai and be done with it.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: He notes how the Kalishplosions reach their illogical extreme here, as they often have no source at all.
  • Tempting Fate: After going through the numerous reasons why the Overdrive team failed to impress him prior to "Once a Ranger"...
    "But these are isolated incidents. It's not like the Rangers will be douchebags in this anniversary episode, will they?"
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:invoked
    • He notes the ideas behind Overdrive were solid; it was the execution that made it so awful.
    • Comes up whilst discussing "Once A Ranger" — Lewis notes that he felt that the idea of a team of veteran Rangers returning to duty would have been more interesting than the Overdrive Rangers, particularly since the latter had proven to be uninteresting Designated Heroes. Further, while the episode is full of fanservice and could have been a great team-up, the fanservice is not done well and the two teams barely interact. He specifically cites the episode as an example of how to do a team-up episode wrong.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: At the end of the Mystic Force video, Lewis notes that for as many problems he had with that season, he feels that Operation Overdrive is the worst that Power Rangers has to offer. He also expresses this at the beginning & end of the review.
  • Vindicated by Historyinvoked: Whilst he doesn't have much good to say about the season, Lewis praises the twist revealing that Mack was actually a machine instead of human; specifically noting that the arc plays out for several episodes in a season that rushed most plot developments, the Rangers (Who Lewis points to as being dicks for most of the season) were immediately accepting of Mack not being human, the reveal was unnerving & the ultimate pay off to the story being earned.
  • Wall Bangerinvoked: Linkara's opinion on at least two moments in this series. He considers Dax letting a villain walk away with the scroll while making absolutely no attempt to stop her absolutely mind-bogglingly idiotic, with footage of Linkara literally banging his head against the wall (only the second time Lewis has showed himself on camera in the whole HOPR series). And then again when one of the Alpha robots is revealed to have been left in an abandoned warehouse in a box for years and speaks with a horrible voice that doesn't sound anything like any of the past Alphas, further made Wall Banger-y by the fact that they didn't bother contacting any of the three voice actors who provided the original voices.
  • What the Hell, Hero?:
    • Called out the Overdrive Rangers during "Once A Ranger" for quitting, citing numerous examples of when other Rangers had no powers or otherwise had the odds heavily stacked against them and kept fighting (with at least one from nearly every prior season).
    • Called out the producers on the decision to have the Veteran Rangers retrieve Alpha from a crate in a warehouse in Angel Grove, since it means that the Rangers had left Alpha to rot in a box for several years.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?invoked: Brings this up in regards to the voices for Thrax & Alpha 6 in the "Once A Ranger" special - Lewis explicitly questions why they didn't bring back Robert Axelrod to voice Lord Zedd's son, or any of the previous voice actors who voiced Alpha, since they were already bringing back 5 former Rangers (Including flying Johnny Yong Bosch out to New Zealand) for the episode.
  • Word of St. Paulinvoked: Notes Johnny Yong Bosch's own Alternate Character Interpretation regarding Adam's actions since his last appearance on the show (namely that Adam was travelling the world doing good deeds, instead of Adam running a dojo).

    Power Rangers Jungle Fury 
  • Alternate Character Interpretationinvoked: Notes the nature of Dai Shi's possession of Jarrod means that it's unclear just how much of what was seen through the season was actually Dai Shi or an amalgamation of the two personalities, with one example being Dai Shi's code of honor & if it was actually his code or just part of Jarrod's personality shining through.
  • The Atoner: He thinks Casey has elements of this, what with viewing Jarrod being possessed by Dai Shi as his own fault, and his attacking Dai Shi's palace was atonement for his actions.
  • Awesome Musicinvoked: Likes the theme song, and considers it a step above the Overdrive theme (though given his hatred of that theme, it's not really saying much). Alongside this, he really likes the overall fight music, barring a few odd cases like the Spirit Ranger's debut fight.
  • The Cast Show Off: Loves the greater focus on strict and straight-forward martial arts, rather than the excessive use of "Kalish-splosions" and Wire Fu.
  • Character Development: He was very pleased with the character development this season, as everyone got an arc or at least a strong demonstration of their personality and contributions to the group.
  • Continuity Nod: He speculates that R.J.'s Hand Wave about how he created the morphers was meant to tie into Doctor Hartford of Operation Overdrive. He also notes that Dai Shi's flag actually has a pizza on it, believing it might be the source of the evil pizza's that could not withstand a red light in Turbo.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: R.J. is about as far removed from what you would expect a martial arts master to be, but proves to be highly skilled and a great teacher in his own right.
  • Eccentric Mentor: Praises the use of this trope in R.J., feeling it's a good change of pace from the usual serious mentor as he manages to have an entertaining laid back personality while still being an effective teacher.
  • He Really Can Actinvoked: Praises the cast for their work, and notes that there's very few instances of cringeworthy acting in the season, outside of a few one-shot characters.
  • Inferred Holocaustinvoked: Points that by the end of the pilot episode, the rangers haven't done anything to solve the problem with the city getting flooded, and when the Megazords are fighting Grizaka, notes that they sent him flying through several buildings.
  • It's the Same, so It Sucksinvoked: Averted - Lewis notes that Jungle Fury uses some of the same tropes as the preceding Operation Overdrive in several instances, such as the season's serialized nature & use of multiple villain factions, but feels that it comes across as Operation Overdrive being a dry run for several ideas that Jungle Fury used in a much better fashion.
  • Koan: Discusses this trope, implicitly comparing it to the Meaningless Meaningful Words used in Ninja Storm. R.J. always offers advice that is useful, even if it takes some time for them to understand the lesson. The Stinger for the video even shows a scene of R.J. mocking Dai Shi by saying "By tomorrow, today will be yesterday." and caps it off with saying he likes to leave people with a phrase that confuses them.
  • Moral Dissonance: Complains about this with regards to Dai Shi/Jarrod breaking a code as a child to not use martial arts skills on inferior opponents when Power Rangers is about using violence against evil.
  • Narm / "No. Just... No" Reaction invoked: Responded to the Spirit Masters transforming into anthropomorphic animals as their highest level by just repeating "No. No. No." in a disappointed tone for around a minute, and later notes that the idea was just kinda dumb for how little the animal forms are on screen.
  • Needs More Love: invoked He brings up how this series is sandwiched between the highly disliked Operation Overdrive and the Crazy Awesome RPM, and as such is rarely discussed. But he found the acting to be above par with some great character arcs, and returns the series to focus more on martial arts skills instead of excessive explosions and wire work.
  • Pragmatic Hero/The Power of Friendship: Considers both sides of the debate to have good points in regards to Casey's skill level at the start of the season; Theo for saying that a beginner shouldn't be holding the team back, as the villains won't wait for them to catch up; and RJ for saying that if they don't work as a team, they won't win anyway.
  • Remember the New Guy: Is bothered by the Rangers knowing who Grizzaka is when they first see him since they haven't actually met him before like the other overlords.
  • Rookie Red Ranger: Points out that the trope is again used with Casey, and that Jungle Fury deconstructs the concept by having it immediately pointed out that the skill gap between Casey & his teammates is a major problem when the team is faced with the immediate threat of Dai Shi.
  • Running Gag: Dubbing Master Mao over with Shadis from Attack on Titan Abridged due to visual similarities.
    • Being unable to remember the names of various martial arts words that are brought up, screwing up the names deliberately.
    • Brings back the "Neeeeeeeever coming back again" gag when one of the baddies is sucked into a crystal.
  • Strawman Has a Pointinvoked: As brought in Pragmatic Hero above, Theo is treated as being wrong for not wanting Casey's inexperience to hold the team back, and while he admits RJ has a point, Theo also does since the villains won't wait for Casey to catch up.
  • Take That: He takes several jabs at the Neo-Saban era of the show (particularly Megaforce) during this review.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucksinvoked:
    • Averted - Lewis notes that Jungle Fury plays against several longstanding conventions of the franchise, such as the team consisting of the original three Rangers until the halfway point being the longest Power Rangers has gone with such a small group of Rangers, but praises the season for doing so.
    • Lewis makes a point of this being the fan reaction to the season's morphers; however, he states that he's okay with the changes to the morphers from Gekiranger, liking the sunglasses design as a change of pace after the standard fare with the morphers, plus they're objects that are easy to conceal and won't stand out.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked:
    • Notes that the subplot of R.J. transforming into a werewolf is wrapped up too quickly, lasting a total of two episodes.
    • Praises the introduction of the Spirit Master Rangers & their addition to the team, but notes that since they were original creations for Jungle Fury & their actors were still guest stars, the show was limited in what they could do with them by both their budget & Gekiranger footage.
  • Trash the Set: Notes that in an interesting inversion, this season it's not the Rangers headquarters that gets trashed, blown up, or otherwise destroyed, but the Villains.
  • Troubled Productioninvoked: Notes the difficulty with the Writers Strike made some plot points kind of drop out in the middle episodes and resurface towards the end. But also notes that he can't tell any discernible change in quality between any given episode, making it not so big of a problem.
  • Truth in Television: Referenced when talking about Jarrod in the character section. "He was a bully because of the bullying he received when he was younger, showing how damaging and detrimental that can be to children."
  • Vindicated by Historyinvoked: Ends by describing Jungle Fury as an underrated season that's rarely spoken about & by praising the fight scenes, story, music & acting.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?invoked: Whilst he praises the Ranger uniforms this year, Lewis notes that R.J. & Theo's Ranger suits look more like tracksuits than a superhero costume (which ironically was indeed the case in the Sentai it was based off of, where the costumes were made by a sports company). He also makes the point that the Rangers' standard uniforms (primarily their color with a black design) using a white collar, whilst their Jungle Master uniforms (primarily white with a design in their ranger color) use a black collar doesn't make much sense.

    Power Rangers RPM 
  • Aborted Arc: Notes that with the change in showrunner and writer during the show's production, a few plot points didn't go anywhere or went different places than they would have under the original crew.
  • Actually Pretty Funny: While not taken with "Power/Rangers" spoof film overall, he did laugh his ass off at its take on Hip-hopkido.
  • Arc Welding: Whist Lewis notes that Power Rangers Samurai firmly placed RPM into it's own separate universe, he notes that the destruction caused by Venjix could be quickly undone by some of the alien species seen over the course of the previous seasons heading to Earth & helping humanity rebuild, which would subsequently mean that they would be seen as humanity's friends whilst cybernetics would be persecuted due to Venjix's actions, which would explain their places in society as seen in Power Rangers S.P.D..
  • Dear Negative Reader: He quotes a critic/troll on the forums who mocks him for spending so much time looking for deeper meaning in a lighthearted kids show, and he points out the truly dark and deep elements this season has while still being a fun, overall lighthearted kids show.
  • Executive Meddling:invoked Again discusses that by this point Disney had long since stopped caring about the series and would've stopped at Jungle Fury if a clause from their European Jetix branch didn't state they had to a least make one more Power Rangers series. Luckily they decided to give free reign to the producers and let them do whatever they wanted since they figured it was the last season anyway. But for some odd reason fired Eddie Guzelian in the middle of the season with no explanation, forcing Judd Lynn to take over for the rest of the series. It thankfully didn't effect too much as Judd managed to play catch up and work with what they had, but it did alter some intended plot points.
  • Fan Film: He spends some time talking about the graphically violent independently made Power/Rangers short film that was released within a few weeks of this installment. He stated outright he was not a fan, especially that the satire was not made by a fan but someone making a statement about the Darker and Edgier reboots Hollywood does. Among many things he listed Poe's Law and Shallow Parody in how so many people were saying it was actually the Power Rangers "fans wanted." "Yeah, Zach doing drugs, sleeping with prostitutes and violently murdering enemies is what we always wanted to see." He does admit he laughed hysterically at the "Hip Hop Kido Dance Video." In the conclusion he compares how the two handle similar ideas, listing RPM as actually being enjoyable while being darker and okay for kids to watch.
  • Filler: Points out the behind-the-scenes episode was this due to Judd Lynn taking over and needing something to stall for time while he got caught up with the series.
  • Grand Finale: While this was long released after it was known that RPM isn't the grand finale, and, by extension, this isn't the finale of Linkara's series, it's still treated as such (with Linkara even adding a music video at the end with that sort of effect).
  • Jitter Cam: While RPM does lessen the Kalishplosions, it's biggest weakness in the action scenes is the infamous Shaky Cam.
  • Misaimed Fandom: invoked Discussed when he talks about the Power Rangers fan film that had come out since the last vid. He notes the maker of that vid intended it as a parody of Power Rangers, noting that if Hollywood rebooted it as a movie, they would probably try to play it seriously and make it Darker and Edgier at the cost of the cheesy charm and humor that makes Power Rangers what it is. However, Lewis also says that a lot of news articles and viewers missed that point, took the film seriously, and actually thought it was a good idea.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Lewis points out how the name RPM suggests a car theme but has very little to do with a show set After the End due to the robot apocalypse.
  • "Not Making This Up" Disclaimer: Lewis gives one before he reads Eddie Guzelian's profanity-laden rant when he saw the incredibly goofy sentai footage he had to adapt into a show that would appeal to an older audience. To quote Guzelian below:
    Holy sh**! I just promised Disney I could turn this into a show that would appeal to an OLDER audience! I must be out of my f***ing mind! Holy sh**! Wait, what's on the front of that Zord? Are those motherf***ing eyeballs?!
  • Out of Focus: Notes that it's one of the seasons where the Red Ranger isn't the show's focal point.
  • Pragmatic Adaptation: Lewis comments on how different the source footage from Engine Sentai Go-onger was from RPM. He also points out that Eddie Guzelian was unfamiliar with the series, he did watch some episodes before hand. This combined with the vastly different sentai footage led to script delays. This is actually rather ironic compared to Power Rangers Turbo which did something similar.
  • Recycled Script:invoked Notes the similarities of the brother-sister storyline from Power Rangers in Space
  • Romance on the Setinvoked: Makes a typical "Aww, they should get married" joke about Ziggy & Dr K's relationship, but expands it to note that the actors playing the characters actually did.
  • Shallow Parody: invoked Discusses the mean-spirited and superficial way the Power/Rangers short film treated the subject material with how RPM had an intimate understanding of Power Rangers tropes and made it self-aware but also something of a reconstruction by being self-aware and explaining how it all works.
  • Take a Third Option: Most fans are split as to whether Summer is either a Bad Ass and one of the best characters of the season or a Mary Sue who inserts herself where she's not needed/wanted and gets in the way of other Rangers development. Linkara thinks she's... Underdeveloped. He argues that most of her Character Development happens in her backstory episodes and barring that she's just sort of there.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: Discusses that Venjix came the closest out of any Power Ranger villain to pull this off due to pretty much taking over Earth.
  • Troubled Production:invoked Coming off the writers strike, with producer Bruce Kalish leaving to do his own things, Disney always looking for ways to get rid of the show and hiring an untested producer Eddie Guzelian who promised to make an especially goofy Sentai series into a mature show that would appeal to older audiences. Said producer was replaced mid season over undisclosed reasons and veteran Judd Lynn took over. Linkara notes that, while it does show up in a shift in writing, the series is exceptionally strong regardless.
  • When Things Spin, Science Happens: Why is Dillon spinning on a turntable while the exposition on the ranger suits is given? Science.

    Power Rangers Samurai 
  • Actually Pretty Funny: Despite not liking Xandred, Linkara admits the joke about him talking without moving his mouth is this due to the Xandred suit not having a very moving mouth.
  • Adapted Out: He notes that the original Shinkenger had the Rangers accompanied by a massive support staff, including stage-hands carrying flags and banners to their battles. These people were not present in Samurai (minus a cameo in one of the Halloween specials), but fragments of this remain in the overall infrastructure.
  • Alternate Character Interpretationinvoked: Discusses how screwed-up he thinks the Samurai Rangers must be due to the heavy burden placed on them by their families, citing Kevin's perfectionism as an example, even looking at Mia's cooking as a way for her to break out of that routine and do something for herself.
  • Arc Fatigueinvoked: Feels this way in general over Deker's story arc, while impressed with the backstory and a surprising finale, felt it was dragged out longer than it should have been.
  • Artistic License – Medicine: When Antonio has his consciousness implanted into a dead fish about to be eaten by a stray cat, he becomes deathly afraid of fish, and the other Rangers try to help him with what they call "Aversion Therapy". Not only does Linkara point out that Aversion Therapy is something completely different, but what they are doing (Exposure Therapy) is supposed to be done slowly over a long period of time, and all shoving what someone is terrified of in their faces will do is likely cause the person to have a panic attack.
  • Badass Decayinvoked: Averted in terms of Bulk, while Linkara notes many fans considered this a severe step backwards in Bulk's character (especially from In Space) he points out Bulk still has the same development and gumption he gained throughout the series, and his reactions to battle isn't cowardice per say, but just a realistic reaction to facing a dangerous monster when you have no special powers or weapons, like the Rangers have (again, noting In Space was a situation of it being humanity's last stand, so of course Bulk would have an excuse for Taking A Level In Badass there).
  • Call Back: Reminds us why Jayden and Lauren can't be the Red Ranger at the same time by pointing out what happened with the White Ranger Clone.
    • Relates Lauren's arrival to replace Jayden as the same "Originally-destined Red Ranger replaces established Red Ranger" plot as Alex replacing Wes in Time Force. However, he does call attention to the fact that Alex was an ass so the other Rangers wanting Wes back was understandable, but in Samurai Lauren is quite nice and sympathetic, so the other Rangers not giving her a chance and being obsessed with trying to get Jayden back comes off as jerkish.
  • Child Soldiers: Notes that due to the heavy burdens of familial responsibility placed on the Samurai Rangers and the clear pressure they've been under due to their duty to fight the Nighloks, to the point they're pretty much told to drop everything to answer the call, he considers them this. He also notes that while he joked about Zordon previously, it's worth noting that Zordon (and practically every other mentor) offered their rangers a choice in the matter, and while Jayden technically offers that choice, their families still spent their lives forcing them down the path of samurai.
  • Christmas Rushed: invoked Because of the last minute Uncanceled, the show had about half the normal production period than normal. This results in truncated filming and scripts that are almost direct translations from the original Shinkenger.
  • Conflict Ball: He hates the artificial issues brought on by Jayden actually leaving the team after the reveal that he was not the proper heir to the Red Ranger legacy. Especially that Lauren is incredibly sympathetic throughout (she's equally skilled and does nothing poor as a leader to earn their ire) and that Jayden acts as though everyone is upset over the deception, when they don't care from the start.
  • Ending Fatigueinvoked: While he does give credit to the 'team-up episode' Clash of the Red Rangers despite its numerous shortcomings, he does note that the driving force for the plot was resolved halfway through the second episode, and thus all that was left was 15 minutes of a rather uninteresting fight scene that just seemed to stretch on forever.
  • Everyone Calls Him Barkeep: Points out that since Mentor Ji doesn't really have a first or last name, all the Rangers just call him "Mentor". He also points how that this really annoys him since it sounds really awkward whenever a Ranger calls him this, every single time.
  • Fake Shemp: Brings this up in regards to the "Clash of the Red Rangers" two-parter, how the RPM Red Ranger Scott remained morphed the entire time (and Antonio was not seen out of costume). The reasons for this were complicated, as Scott's actor had become a SAG member and Power Rangers has always been a non-union production, so he got around that by using an alternate stage name and providing the voice over. But Linkara does say that while the set-up could be extremely disappointing, there was some value in that staying morphed supported the plot-relevant distrust, and there was still effort made to show the personality clash between the vehicle oriented RPM ranger and the mystical Samurai rangers.
  • Felony Misdemeanor: Jayden's secret that lasts the entirety of the series was not so bad that it obviously needed to be kept secret, and when it is discovered Jayden himself is distraught he had to hide it from his friends while they understood exactly why.
  • Fridge Horror: invoked He talks about how the Rangers were drilled into being ready to fight as Samurai Rangers from a young age, and as a result they had significant emotional scars and took failure extremely hard. Linkara's fury at how Mentor Ji treats Antonio as unworthy for not having that long tradition is among his biggest rants, since Antonio is not merely self taught but also the only Ranger who joins out of personal desire and not from longstanding family pressure.
  • Frothy Mugs of Water: Despite not having seen Shinkenger, Xandred's "medicine" doesn't fool him for a second.
  • Generic Doomsday Villain: Really doesn't find Xandred impressive. He doesn't even lead plans, he just sits around drinking medicine, and does this for over 99% of the season. And even then, he doesn't have any redeeming qualities like an awesome voice or a humor factor that other villains could at least hold claim to. He even goes on record to say that compared with his other least enjoyable villains (Divatox, Lothor, Bansheera), at least they would do something with their time, making him perhaps the WORST lead villain to this point.
  • He Really Can Act: invoked Not so much surprise for the actress herself, but comments that Lauren is so well performed compared to the rest of the cast (being Power Rangers, most of the acting rarely gets above just "okay") it makes her that much more sympathetic for their bad attitude towards her.
  • Hero-Worshipper: Gets quite annoyed about the Samurai Rangers being this for Jayden, especially when Lauren enters the picture and is clearly trying her best, but the others barely give her a chance because 'she's not Jayden'.
  • Homoerotic Subtext: Even he admits the almost sexual undertones between Jayden and Antonio, and shows the infamous clip of Antonio eyeing Jayden while saying "I'm ready for some action." (ostensibly for sparring).
  • Impossibly Tacky Clothes: While he admits he enjoyed how the Moogers' top-half looked Lovecraftian in design, he says the orange pants were pretty tacky and made them look strangely bulky.
  • Karma Houdini: For all the reasons Linkara has to dislike Mentor Ji, one thing in particular that irks him is the fact that he never gets called out when he makes a mistake. There was even an instance where both Mentor Ji and Jayden are in the wrong, and only Jayden ends up called out and apologizing, Mentor Ji just standing in the background avoiding the blame.
  • Lame Pun Reaction: This season's problem with the fight scenes? The Rangers keep invoking this trope for the audience.
  • Last Minute Hook Up: There are some hints that Mike and Emily would end up together, but this comes mostly from a few instances of characters talking about it rather than actually showing them interacting and having chemistry throughout the season.
  • Man Child: Says that since Spike's actor was clearly trying to channel Skull from the first season of Mighty Morphin' (keyword: try) that he comes across this way, despite the fact Spike was obviously supposed to be around 17 or 18.
  • Magic Versus Science: Notes that the team-up has elements of this, even leading into a minor tangent stating that these were the two basic styles of Power Ranger shows (listing Mighty Morphin, Zeo, Overdrive, and RPM as falling on the science side, while Mystic Force, Wild Force, and Samurai fall on the spiritual side). Also claims that the difference between the two methodologies, and even the way the command centers are decorated (and how Ranger Red reacts to them) increase his enjoyment of the episode.
  • Merchandise-Driven: Got rather annoyed with this through the season, as new zords and power-up after power-up happened in every other episode. He didn't mind the armored form used to pilot the zords or the white jacket super mode (feeling both were distinctive and "At least it isn't glitter!"), but the new battle discs and weapon variations wore thin.
  • Out of Order: Decided to go with the official first episodes "Origins" (which aired at the end of the series) instead of the third episode that was first aired. He notes "Origins" isn't a great episode, but does have a fantastic opening scene that would have endeared audiences to the show much faster.
    • Also noted is that, despite premiering between seasons, "Clash of the Red Rangers" uses power-ups and Zords that wouldn't be properly introduced until Super Samurai.
  • Plot Hole: Points out that sometimes the writers would forget important plot points between episodes! For instance, in one episode Xandred mutates one of his monsters for betraying him and sets him loose on the Rangers, but in the next episode Xandred has no idea why the monster was mutated and what it was doing on Earth. Another one has Lauren joining the team because she finally mastered her sealing training ... only to be still needing to train to master the technique in the next episode.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Linkara points out two major instances of this, the first being that Jayden insists on keeping the fact he's not actually the head of the Shiba family a secret from his team, even though there was no reason to keep that a secret and he just ended up orchestrating drama where it didn't need to be there. The second was Dayu and Deker's sub-plot, in which Deker has forgotten all about his former life with Dayu and Dayu keeps wanting him to remember ... only for Dayu to never bother to just tell Deker who he was and actually try and help him remember.
  • Power Glows: He liked the unique morphing style of the season, writing colored symbols into the air and becoming their helmet. The grand Sealing Symbol used against Xandred near the end also had additional fire effects, which made it feel like something special and unique.
  • Race Lift: Zig-zagged, he actually has no fundamental issue with the team being multicultural instead of all Japanese, rationalizing one of their ancestors may have been adopted or just not Japanese and married into the family, although he does admit Jayden having the very Japanese last name of Shiba while being Caucasian was just odd. Given Power Rangers hasn't had an Asian Red Ranger (White or black, with some argument towards Native American and hispanic) yet it would have been a nice touch and probably more appropriate.
    • He does call out the fact Kevin acts bigoted towards Antonio at first due to him not having any "Samurai Heritage" despite the fact he is clearly not Japanese himself.
    • And speaking of Antonio, Linkara points out the show tried really hard to push the fact Antonio was Latino ... only to reveal the actor who played Antonio is actually Thai.
  • Rage Against the Mentor: Oh my, Linkara does not like Mentor Ji, and went on an angry rant about the fact he is one of the most useless mentors in the series, the fact he seems to have no right to even call himself a mentor (since he's not a Ranger himself, nor is ever explained as having any samurai heritage), acts unnecessarily elitist towards Antonio when he wanted to join the team, and typically gives pointless rhetoric as advice (and once even gave the exact opposite advice later in the same episode).
  • Relationship Writing Fumbleinvoked: Calls out the writers for pairing up Mike and Emily in the final episode when, with the exception of a single line of dialogue halfway through the series, the two had pretty much nothing hinting that they felt that way about each other.
  • Revisiting the Roots: This was the first season Saban were making since Disney gave up the rights to the show, and it was obvious they were trying to invoke Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers in Samurai. Linkara points out that this was actually a terrible idea, since the series had evolved so much since the first season, and that forcing it to regress away from its development resulted in, according to him, an awful entry to the franchise.
  • Rewatch Bonus: invoked He admits that after being disappointed watching it when it first came out, seeing it a second time for the purposes of the review let him appreciate certain things a lot better. In particular, he didn't catch Jayden's character arc in how he preferred relying on himself over trusting his teammates, only to build that trust and bring it through the finale.
  • Running Gag: Showing the Bulk and Spike clips with Bulk talking about his many adventures with the Rangers ("Spike, did I ever tell you about the time...?").
    • Any time the Rangers get a new zord, Linkara notes that it commonly gives the Megazord a big, clunky helmet.
  • Serendipity Writes the Plotinvoked: Brings this up with regard to Clash of the Red Rangers, noting that the inability of Eka Darville to be present on set, resulting in Scott being morphed for the whole special, aligned nicely with the plot revolving around the Samurai team's distrust of him.
  • Shallow Parody: invoked Again refers to the Power/Rangers film in that despite the franchise being built on characters who are teenagers or thereabouts, the franchise has never had their characters trained from birth and forced into being Child Soldiers, and they were always given the opportunity to leave if they so desired. This is in discussion of how the characters in this season were trained from a young age to be warriors in fighting evil, but is the exception rather than the rule.
  • Sliding Scale of Free Will vs. Fate: Linkara discusses the fact that unlike other seasons, the Rangers here were pretty much browbeat by their families from a very early age to become Power Rangers, and thus really had no choice to not take the responsibility. He also claims that Jayden giving the other Rangers a choice to leave in the first episode doesn't count as actually giving them a choice, since by then their parents had been pressuring them for years to accept their Samurai duty.
  • They Just Didn't Care:invoked Feels this way about Lionsgate not changing "Origins"'s theme back to the first one and so spoiling the gold ranger early.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Characterinvoked: Expressed disappointment that it was fairly obvious Bulk and Spike were added late in production, since they have very little interaction with the Rangers, and almost no bearing on the plot.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plotinvoked: Says that the biggest problem with the Deker/Dayu subplot is while the Deal with the Devil idea was interesting, the whole thing didn't really go anywhere and had almost no bearing on the main story. Worst, the subplot doesn't even have a satisfying conclusion (Deker and Dayu just die separately and never resolve anything between each other), making it feel even more pointless after the fact.
    • While it was more based on Linkara's own personal interpretation of the characters, he feels there was a lot of lost opportunity in exploring how screwed up the Rangers must have been from being trained to be Samurai Rangers from such an early age. In particular he says Emily's relation to her sick older sister or her possible depression could have been explored, and he would have really liked to see Jayden have more prominent daddy issues, or have a troubled father/son relationship with Mentor Ji.
  • Viewers Are Morons: He conjectures that the Rangers shout out their names during the Theme Song because the production team assumed little kids would be too stupid to remember them otherwise.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: invoked Notes that this is the first series filmed in high definition and looks gorgeous for it.
  • What Could Have Beeninvoked: Although he claims to have gotten the information second-hand, he explains that Bulk and Spike was likely added to the cast because the production team heard there was going to be a Brown Ranger added to the original Super Sentai (this was actually not the case, the character in question was named Richard Brown and was a fake Shinken Brown who wanted to join the team but didn't have any powers).
    • He also shares that he heard in pre-production, ideas were thrown around about the team being billed specifically as an International Team, as well as the show being set in Stone Canyon (the neighboring city to Angel Grove mentioned several times in Mighty Morphin').
  • What the Hell, Hero?: He calls the other Rangers out on being jerks and borderline shunning Lauren just because 'she's not Jayden' when all she wants to do is fulfil her family duty and be their friends. He then calls out Jayden due to the fact he left the team (in the middle of Lauren's welcome party, no less) when there was no reason to, and turning the situation all about him while also causing his teammates to resent Lauren for "making" Jayden leave (she didn't, and wanted him to stay and still be part of the team).
  • The Woobieinvoked: Lauren Shiba. Linkara states that if she had just been a jerk like Alex from Time Force things would have been different, but because her actress (Kimberley Crossman) played her so sympathetic that it made the other Samurai Rangers look really bad when they keep ignoring her and trying to get Jayden to return to the team.
  • You Look Familiar: After Deker appears, Linkara goes on a brief tangent about how Power Rangers is fond of reusing actors during the New Zealand years (Highlighting Kelsen Henderson, Michelle Langstrom, Rick Medina and Holly Shannahan).

    Power Rangers Megaforce 
  • This Is Gonna Suck: Like with Overdrive, Linkara had made no effort to hide his feelings towards Power Ranger's embarrassing anniversary season.


Alternative Title(s):

History Of Power Rangers