Videogame / Factorio

"This is a game that lets you automate Minecraft. [...] It just feels like someone looked at Minecraft and thought, 'Oh, this is wrong, let's do this properly!"
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/factorio_tvtropes_9820.jpg

Factorio is a crowdfunded top-down 2-dimensional construction and management game, with RTS elements planned for later updates. Currently the game is officially an alpha, but has had impressive critical (winning two of the four categories at the 2015 Czech Game Of The Year awards) and financial success already.

The final details of the framing narrative have not been hammered out yet, but the broad gist of it is this: You are a survivor of a spaceship that has crashed on an alien world, only to find that the planet is populated by a number of enormous and highly aggressive insectoid species that become agitated by noise and air pollution. Utilizing local materials and your own knowledge, you start building vast factories and transport networks, establishing the industrial infrastructure necessary to launch a rocket and regain spaceflight capability.

The game has both singleplayer and Co-Op Multiplayer modes. A demo is available on the Factorio website, with the full game available on the website, and from Steam, GOG and the Humble Store for 20/$20.


Factorio Provides Examples Of:

  • All There in the Script: The planet Factorio takes place on is called Nauvis. The only place you'll find that word is inside the game's code.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: A lot of things that you would think would require electric power conveyor belts, splitters, large water pumps don't need to be powered in-game because doing so would just add a layer of annoyance and not add anything to the gameplay.
  • Art Evolution: The initial release of the game had a very cartoony art style, such as the original model for the car being a Cadillac Eldorado with clown-car proportions. As development went on, the art style was refined into the Diesel Punk-esque aesthetic.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Using the train to plough through enemies. The train takes next to no damage and can easily squish the largest of bugs, but it's not always easy getting enemies to nicely line up along the railway tracks as they do in some of the trailers.
    • Flame turrets have good range and do good damage and consume any oil product the player might not have much use for. Unfortunately, they need pipe networks laid out to them from the oil refineries, their Painfully Slow Projectiles cause them to overshoot fast-moving enemies, and they have a minimum range within which they cannot target. The only time they are effective for more than showing off is under heavy siege by highly evolved enemies that spend a lot of time gnawing at the walls in a stationary position and absorb lots of damage before going down.
  • Bag of Holding: Given both the large number of inventory slots and items stacking, it's not hard to fit an entire locomotive and several cargo wagons with plenty of space to spare.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: Nothing but. Even the "small" bugs are the size of a man. Big bugs are the size of a dump truck and can shrug off high-explosive rockets.
  • Car Fu: The car and tank will plough through anything in their way, though the car is damaged in the process. The train, on the other hand, will gleefully plough through an entire swarm of bugs - or you - without breaking a sweat.
    • Subsequently acknowledged with two achievements; one for being killed by a speeding train, and another for surviving 500 points of damage delivered in a single hit... which can only happen by standing in the path of a train.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: Primarily for speed:
    • Basic transport belts are yellow, fast ones are red, and the fastest tier are blue.
    • Yellow and red inserters are the middle tier of inserter. Gray are the slowest, and blue (and every variant that requires a blue inserter to craft) are the fastest inserters without introducing mods.
    • Gray assembly machines are the slowest, then blue, then yellow/green.
  • Cool Car: The handbuilt car is fast, agile, can run on anything that burns and can ram into trees without taking significant damage.
  • Cool Train: The diesel engine is fairly snazzy in terms of appearance and it will become the backbone for any large factory once local mineral deposits are depleted.
  • Creepy Cockroach: The aforementioned Big Creepy-Crawlies often resemble swarms of giant cockroaches.
  • Cruelty Is the Only Option: In peaceful mode, the bugs stay in their nests and never attack your factory. However, you still have to attack the nests in order to get alien artifacts necessary to craft top-tier items and to win the game. Some Game Mods avert this by adding other ways to make the artifacts.
  • Diesel Punk / Steam Punk: The most common power source are enormous inline 3-cylinder steam engines. Factories are dirty and puff out steam and smoke, and almost everything runs on coal or oil.
  • Easy Logistics: Buildings have no maintenance, though it's averted in almost all other respects. Gun turrets require an ammunition assembly line and a delivery system to actually bring ammo to turrets, and mineral deposits eventually run out, requiring you to shift your extractors around or find whole new mineral fields.
  • Fragile Speedster: The car. It's the fastest non-railway vehicle in the game, and since patch 0.11 the car has included a roof-mounted machine gun. However, speed comes at the sacrifice of armour, and even crashing into a tree can severely damage the car.
  • Frickin' Laser Beams: Lasers are slower than regular bullets. Somehow.
  • Gaia's Vengeance / Green Aesop: Bugs are attracted by noise and air pollution, produced by almost all machinery, but particularly those that burn materials to generate power. Trees absorb pollution, meaning that building your own hidden factory will prevent bug attacks but create a very inefficient factory, whereas operating under a clear-cut philosophy, cutting down all nearby trees will make a very efficient factory that draws the attention of nearby bug nests. Even if you opt for the former, excessive pollution will eventually kill your pollution-absorbing buffer. Maintaining a careful balance of pollution, production, and protection is necessary to prevent your early factories from being overrun by bugs.
  • Game Mod: Varies from simple mods to change recipes or make minor adjustments to gameplay, such as the Long Reach, Tree Farm, and Autofill mods, to entire game-changing mods that add in new resources and enemies and/or make radical changes to the tech tree, such as the collection of mods collectively referred to as Bob's Mods. Concepts and ideas from several mods have been adapted into official game mechanics.
    • Complexity Addiction: Mods that scratch this itch (yes, even moreso than the base game) are very popular with the playerbase.
  • Hope Spot: In the second campaign's first level, the player receives an emergency transmission from other survivors about 200km away. When he reaches that location by the second level, they are all dead and the base is in ruins.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Raw fish (found in lakes) is somehow used to restore the player character's health.
  • Inconveniently Placed Conveyor Belt: Mostly averted. Conveyor belts are one the most useful things in the game, for moving both resources and the player quickly across the map. That said, as a factory grows larger and more labyrinthine, it's inevitable that the player will end up trying to run against one at some point.
  • Kill It with Fire: Post 0.13, the Flamethrower is the most efficient way to deal with both spawners and Worms. Pop in, spray maybe a tenth of a fuel canister onto the ground around them, then step back and watch the health bars shrink away.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Higher-level biters move quite a bit faster than the player does, and hit like a truck. Luckily for the player, they get to become a Lightning Bruiser themselves using power armor and exoskeletons.
  • Look Both Ways: Be careful when walking over a railway or the train may run you over and turn you into a fine mist.
  • Magic Tool: The repair unit. A generic spanner and hammer, it can repair any machinery with surprising speed. However, they wear out quickly, so it's recommended to carry several at any given time. Construction robots can use repair units to automatically repair damaged machinery within range of a roboport.
  • Mighty Glacier: The tank, which is incredibly durable and deadly, but doesn't move much faster than walking speed.
  • More Dakka: The base gun turret is essentially a giant machine gun. Tech upgrades exist to give it more dakka.
  • Non-Indicative Name:
    • The "diesel" locomotive can be powered by everything from freshly cut logs to coal to rocket fuel.
    • The "steam" engine can run off of any liquid, not just water, as long as it's sufficiently hot. You can power your base with boiling sulfuric acid if you so desire.
  • No OSHA Compliance: Averted. Factory machinery can't harm the player...except for the train, which will kill the player if it hits you at full speed.
  • One Hit Poly Kill: The tank's cannon shells can continue flying through bugs and buildings until they run out of damage to deal.
  • Pipe Maze: Improper placement of your pipes will make it much harder to move through your factory. It is possible to minimize this issue by using pipes that are partially laid underground, although that costs more resources to produce.
  • Powered Armor: A late-game research allows you to craft Power Armor (and later, MK2 armor) which can be customised with equipment such as an exoskeleton for a higher run speed or a built-in shield generator. Or a portable roboport.
  • Recursive Ammo: Cluster grenades scatter several smaller grenades around along with its own explosion.
  • Refining Resources: A major part of gameplay. You take base materials lumber, stone, crude oil, iron and copper ore, coal and use various machines to craft any number of materials, ranging from gun ammo to computer chips and machine parts.
  • Retreaux: The graphics are very similar to early 2000s strategy game, in the style of Command and Conquer or Age of Empires, created by using highly detailed 3D models which are subsequently run through a program to make 2D sprites.
  • Ridiculously Fast Construction: Assemblers can create gadgets in an amazingly short amount of time, such as creating a gear cog from plate iron in under a second. The player can hand-assemble a car with pre-made parts in about ten seconds.
  • Schizo Tech: Steam engines powered by coal are the primary source of electricity used to power automated assembly plants that build power armour and laser defence turrets.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: The standard shotgun has a very bad range but deals the most damage of all the weapons that the player can wield until they unlock the even more powerful combat shotgun, which gives a 20% damage bonus on top of any shell damage upgrades you've researched.
  • Shout-Out: The repair pack previously used an icon of the Eleventh Doctor's sonic screwdriver. Certain buildings are assigned a name from a list of backer-chosen names, which has inevitably led to references such as "Lab AunOTauShi".
  • Simple, yet Awesome: Clear cutting a forest with the aforementioned combat shotgun used to be the best way to go about it.
  • Spider Tank: Factorio Facts #120 showcased the 'Spidertron' prototype, an 8-limbed Mini-Mecha capable of climbing over obstacles and fording shallow water.
  • Sprint Shoes: Exoskeletons, which are slotted into Power Armor, make the player run faster. Multiple exoskeletons can be used at once, potentially allowing the player to outrun the car, as long as they have enough power. There's also placeable movement speed-boosters in the form of brick and concrete floors.
  • Tank Goodness: The tank vehicle was added in patch 0.11 as a more durable alternative to the car. Although much slower, it is pretty much indestructible, mowing over trees and small enemies without care. Just in case, it's also armed with a high-calibre turret and a heavy submachine gun.
  • Tech Tree: A very large and complex one, though the game makes it easy to visualise the prerequisites and dependencies of any research item.
  • The Turret Master: The player. Because most of your weapons are ineffectual against massed bug swarms, turrets are key to defending your factories. Gun turrets are cheap and don't require electricity, but require an extensive logistics network to maintain their ammo. Laser turrets are expensive to craft and require huge amounts of electricity, but don't need any conveyor systems for ammo.
  • Units Not to Scale: Possibly. The top-down style makes it hard to tell how big things are. For example, defence walls look like they're about half the height of the player which doesn't make sense if you think about it.
  • Unwinnable by Mistake: Before version 0.13 without mods, there was no way to cross water even though it's possible to spawn an island, forcing you to quit and start a new game.
  • Utility Belt: A customizable smaller bag of holding where each item slot is linked with a hotkey (therefore does not need to open and close the main inventory to access an item). Convenient when building large projects, and panic plopping turrets or an escape vehicle.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: Factorio almost encourages you to play like a Captain Planet villain: clear cut forests, use up natural resources, pollute the environment for a vaguely-explained reason...all in the name of making your factory bigger and better.
  • Videogame Flamethrowers Suck: Thoroughly averted as of the 0.13 release. The flamethrower (and its turret equivalent) behave more like real-life flamethrowers, spurting a jet of napalm that creates short-lived patches of intense fire wherever it lands and dealing significant damage to anything around it. Bugs die en masse running through the flames. Spawners and worms can be rapidly killed by setting them on fire. The same release introduced the ability to set fire to trees and thus burn down forests, generating vast amounts of pollution that will provoke more enraged aliens to charge into your war crime of a weapon's sights. All in all, a good day to be one of said Captain Planet villains.
  • Wide Open Sandbox: Although there is a goal build the rocket silo and launch the satellite you are not bound by any one set path to achieve that goal.
  • You Have Researched Breathing: The player is an automation and logistics engineer on an alien planet trying to launch a rocket into space. They must first research how to smelt steel.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Videogame/Factorio