Funny / Tabletop Games

We critically-failed our keep-a-straight-face check.



Roleplaying Games

Rulebooks and accessories

  • The Power of the Creators spell from Magi-Nation, for many reasons. For one thing, it's a completely meta card that lets you off anyone you don't like... so long as they didn't work on the card game. The art depicts a giant finger from nowhere ready to flick a poor Magi into the sunset. And its card type? "Universally Desired Spell." Snerk.
  • The otherwise forgettable game Living Steel (half the rulebook was pictures of guns with massive lists of modifiers for things related to shooting) had sidebar comments such as: "I did not order, did not receive, and will not pay for Item 27, 'Tax', on your invoice." attributed to 'Ronald Unreasonable', and the eternally useful "Hm. That looks like a serious injury. I think you're going to have to go back to the Character Generation section."
  • The opening fiction of Scion: Demigod shows Eric Donner, Scion of Thor, and his discovery of the horrific vision that is... basic cable.
    Eric: So basically, our culture sucks and everyone under 35 is part of the problem. (later, when asked if he learned anything) Donnie didn't show up at any of the usual hotspots. And I'm cancelling our cable.
    • Later, in order to access where their missing companion has gone, the Band must give an offering of honey to a spirit. Yukiko then reaches into her coat and reveals she carries two packets of it everywhere - in case where they go doesn't carry her favorite brand (she puts it in her tea).
    Dr. Tigrillo: Words fail me.
  • Munchkin. As a Hurricane of Puns, there's going to be at least one that makes you laugh.
  • Possibly more of a Shout-Out but the Red Dwarf reference in the new Doctor Who RPG.
  • Flying Mice's Aces and Angels, a game about World War II fighter pilots, provides the following example of how not to use the game's Luck mechanic: "Luckily, I jump out of the cockpit, do one and a half somersaults in the air, and land on the enemy's fuselage, screaming like a ninja!"
  • In the Fading Suns rulebook, there is a chart on how to do miracles. Like, miracles. You pray to God and if the GM lets you, you may roll if and how it worked. The lowest success (still very hard to achieve) gives you In Mysterious Ways-style events. And what are the best possible results? Completely unexplainable and impossible events — like a sun moving all over the sky, witnessed by millions of people... or the court of Temple Avesti showing mercy.
  • The Mythos Dossiers from The Laundry RPG carry a lot of the typical Lovecraftian dread, but also carry elements of... well, the Laundry. Such as the bit in the BLUE HADES chapter where two Laundry officials who are obviously not qualified for this line of work keep faffing about during their attempts to debrief a Deep One informant. Then once the session's over, "payment" is offered up - the Deep One in question is gay, and since his fellow Deep Ones look down on sex with humans for reasons other than procreation, the Laundry had to provide a partner.
    Do you think he volunteered for the duty, or...
    He's in Accounting.
    Volunteered, then.
  • Mekton Zeta Plus: The section on nukes mentions that (barring GM intervention) anything in the blast radius of a nulear weapon is subject to the Chunky Salsa Rule. After explaining what happens to things outside the blast radius, it goes onto describe the effects of Electromagnetic Pulse, and mentions that, aside from nukes, EMP can be gererated by supernovas...
Determine which multiple of the nuke's blast radius your unit is within. If the source is a supernova, act as if the source is in the same hex as you are and quit worrying - the impending destruction of the entire star system is going to make anything else seem meaningless by comparison. Luckily, supernovae are not a common game hazard - but you never know.
  • The Monster Hearts book has flowery and melodramatic descriptions for the lore of each skin - except for the Ghost Skin, which simply says "Ghosty ghost. You are dead."

Reviews

  • Not the game itself, but this [1] review of FATAL has the part when he attempts to describe putting the Fatal combat mechanics into play:
    Jack's sword cleaved through the cultist's chest, cleaving through the nipple, the xiphoid process - the lowest part of the sternum - and the shoulder blade. The cultist's blade only caused damage to Jack's appendix and his adrenal gland, somehow missing everything else in front of and in back of Jack's adrenal gland and appendix.
  • A certain review of SenZar can also be pretty funny.

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