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Tincan Robot
There was a time when this sort of thing was taken seriously.

In comes a Price Club-sized tin can with Slinky arms and legs, looking like the grandfather of Pimpbot 5000, buzzing with a menace that suggests he flunked Asimov 101.
Jim Wright's Star Trek: Voyager review of "Night"

The opposite of Ridiculously Human Robot and Robot Girl this is a robot designed with function over form in mind. It's in technically humanoid form, but generally looks like a trashcan or boiler on legs (if it even gets those), sometimes with a vaguely humanoid head (if it even has a head). This robot is usually not painted and it's often possible to easily see screw heads holding it together. Bonus points if the robot's arms are made of flexi-tube with pincers at the end.

Nowadays usually done to make the 'bot look amateur-made or old-fashioned, but in older Zeerust works it was often played straight.

Compare Used Future, Real Robot. Contrast with Starfish Robots. See also Forgot He Was a Robot for when this robot starts acting like a Ridiculously Human Robot.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime & Manga  

     Comic Books  
  • Spider-Man once had to deal with the robot XP-2000, who was really obsolete compared to androids like The Vision and Ultron.
    • Keep in mind that Ultron was designed in the 1970s, and Vision was built by Ultron. This says a lot about XP-2000 being designed obsolete. The original Ultron design was actually pretty in-line with this aesthetic, though.
    • The little flying robots used by Spidey's enemy Armada.
    • Also the cobbled-together robots built by Future Max.
    • Finally there's the silver-age Spider-Man villain The Living Brain, featuring the greatest mechanical mind 1964 could offer.
  • "Magnus Robot Fighter: 4000 AD" by Gold Key Comics had a future lousy with robot servants, almost all of them of the tin-can-humanoid variety, generally with flexi-tube or armored-cable limbs.
  • The lumbering warbots of Ashley Wood's World War Robot fit this trope to a T.
  • Tin Can Tommy from The Beano doesn't only fit this trope but has a name to match.
  • Reed Richards's little flying HERBIE robots.
  • Elektro from Fin Fang Four.
  • Gyro Gearloose's helper Little Bulb from the Disney Ducks Comic Universe.
  • All versions of COMPUTO from Legion of Super-Heroes.
  • Doctor Doom's purple Mecha-Mooks.
  • The Sentinels.
  • The Mad Thinker and the Leader seem to prefer using Organic Technology, but they still sometimes build metal robots, which always come out looking like this.
  • Ironhorse from Astro City is like this, built with a steam locomotive motif.

     Film - Animated 

     Film - Live-Action 

     Live Action TV  
  • Robot from the original Lost in Space ; danger, Will Robinson!
  • This is a common monster template in Doctor Who, as they're a relatively easy 'obviously non-human but not obviously just a guy in a suit' monster design:
    • The Daleks of Doctor Who certainly deserve a mention, despite technically being cyborgs. They're sort of bizarre by being six feet tall and having odd hemispherical protrusions, but whatever.
    • Mechanoids, spherical, flamethrower-equipped robots the size of a small shed. There was some hope they'd be the next Daleks.
    • The Krotons, the Sontaran scout robot, the Quarks, the servo robot, the Chumblies, the War Machine, the robot in "Robot"...
    • Parodied gently in "The Celestial Toymaker", where the Toymaker's robot servant is a giant wind-up tin robot.
  • Cheezoid from That Mitchell and Webb Look, which makes sense as he was made in a shed.
  • Star Trek: Voyager: Satan's Robot, the robot that appears in the "Captain Proton" holodeck sequences, which was inspired by the Republic Robot. The holodeck characters act like it's a terrifying Killer Robot, but in reality it's slow-moving, easily disabled and rather pathetic.
  • Robot in Lost in Space
  • TIM from The Tomorrow People had a mobile unit that looked a bit tin-canny.
  • The Venus Probes from The Six Million Dollar Man.
  • Sam the Robot from Sesame Street. This being Sesame Street, of course, he still has googly eyes and a bowtie.
  • Robot, from the Captain Helix Show Within a Show in Hyperdrive; unsurprising, given that it's a parody of Star Wars and cheap imitations of the same.
  • Plex from Yo Gabba Gabba.
  • Andy, the tin box robot on Quark.
  • Toy Org from Power Rangers Wild Force qualifies. He resembles a toy robot, yet is one of the Rangers' strongest foes.
  • Portrayed quite literally in the (intentionally) low-budget 1990s MTV sock-puppet show Sifl and Olly, where Sifl builds a robot literally made out of a tin can to use as a stand-in host for Olly, until Olly returns and destroys in the middle of it singing the 1980s song "I Know What Boys Like" by The Waitresses.
  • Steampunk, one of the combatants in Robot Combat League, is a nod to this type of robot.
  • Giz from "The Edge of Space" segments on Starstuff.
  • TWIKI from Buck Rogers in the 25th Century probably counts.
  • The Federation security robot in Blake's 7 which unfortunately was never as menacing as it was supposed to be, given the tendency of its arms to flap up and down as it moved, and the flamethrower that dropped out of its groin region which caused the production crew to dub it "The Flasher". Eventually the poor bot was restricted to a couple of close-up scenes in the early episodes.
  • The robot that Grandpa and Eddie build in The Munsters episode "Tin Can Man" literally had arms and legs built out of tin cans.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000, of course! Robots clearly made from common household goods.

     Newspaper Comics  
  • The robots in Brewster Rockit frequently fit this trope, especially Oldbot and the Killbots.

     Tabletop Games  
  • Paranoia: Jackobots (from "jack of all trades") are intended to be able to do the same physical things as humans, so they're basically humanoid in size and shape, but clearly mechanical. Other bots range from sorta humanoid (docbots, scrubots) to Sapient Ships (warbots, flybots).
  • Combat, Janitorial and Animal Care robots in the Classic Traveller adventure Research Station Gamma.
  • The Orks in Warhammer 40,000 have Mini-Mecha (with an Ork welded inside) aptly known as Killa Kanz. Their Humongous Mecha are built to a similar design.
    • The Tau attack drones that look like flying trash lids.

     Video Games  

     Visual Novels  

    Webcomics 

     Web Original  
  • Homestar Runner: The Cheat Bot is not a real robot (being The Cheat with a metal can on top), but would be a perfect example if he were.
  • The Garbageman, a Gadgeteer Genius from the Global Guardians PBEM Universe, guarded his lair with robots that looked like they were thrown together from old car parts, some galvanized steel garbage cans, and a lawn mower or two. They looked like that because they were thrown together from old car parts, some galvanized steel garbage cans, and a lawn mower or two. More dangerous than they sounded.
  • While he's more box-like than can, Pollo from Atop the Fourth Wall definitely evokes this trope.

     Western Animation  
  • Transformers Animated has literal Trashcan Robots.
  • B.O.T. from the infamous G1 Transformers episode of the same name.
  • Bender from Futurama is a perfect caricature of a 1950s-style movie-robot, with a tin-can (and cocktail shaker) body, flexi-hose arms and legs, a typical robot head, and eyes clearly lifted from Crow T. Robot. Some of the side characters are Tin Can Robots as well.
    • Fry encounters an actual trash can who also happens to be a self-aware robot.
  • There are several robots in the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies series like this for instance, in "Robot Rabbit" and "Lighter Than Hare". (In the latter, Bugs Bunny even uses the robot as a trash can.)
  • Rosie the robot maid from The Jetsons. (There was also a male robot called Mac, made by Henry, the building janitor.)
  • The Master Cylinder, from Felix the Cat.
  • The Underdog short "March of the Monsters" had these, but it was never stated who the robots' master was.
  • The Fleischer Superman series featured "The Mechanical Monsters", used by the inventor for a series of robberies.
  • In an episode of The Simpsons, Homer builds one of these out of a mailbox for Bart to enter in a Robot Wars-style TV show. Justified in that Homer was secretly working it from inside, having realized he had not the faintest idea how to actually build a robot. When it doesn't work, he instead wears it like armor and pretends to be a robot.
  • XJ-8 from My Life as a Teenage Robot. In comparison, her predecessors are mostly Starfish Robots, and her successor is a more streamlined fembot.
  • Bot from Team Umizoomi
  • NEPTR from Adventure Time literally has a tin can Finn meant to be his "head" and drew a face on. When a lightning bolt brought it to life, its' actual face ended up being elsewhere and the can-head is purely ornamental.
  • H.E.L.P.E.R. from The Venture Bros., the epitome of the robot buddy as seen by pop culture in the 1950s.
  • In Samurai Jack, the earliest robots built for Aku looked like they were made of scrap parts, including tin cans. They weren't very reliable and could only move about for a few seconds before breaking down. They were not sentient, however, so there was no worry about it—the roboticists just went back and designed better robots. By the time Jack arrives in the Bad Future, automatons had become advanced enough that the only ones that didn't pass off as Ridiculously Human Robots were designed intentionally to be robot-like (some of whom also intentionally invoke Tin Can Robot style, such as Extor's wicker basket robots).
  • The Super Robot of Super Robot Monkey Team Hyperforce Go! has boxes for its head, body, and feet, extremely boxy hands and fingers, and tube arms. A late-series episode showed him to be the first in a line of several robots, with the most recent being a much sleeker and human-sized Robot Kid.

They Look Like Us NowRobot Roll CallTV Head Robot
Telescoping RobotRobotTV Head Robot
FembotSliding Scale of AnthropomorphismRobot Buddy
Prop RecyclingImageSource/Live-Action FilmsForbidden Zone

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