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Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: Anime & Manga
  • Many anime series use other words in place of "episode" when ordering episodes (however, some are specific to the original manga versions).
  • Another very popular trick is using music-related terminology or music piece/song titles in episode naming:
    • Bubblegum Crisis: Tokyo 2040 uses 1970s heavy metal/hard rock song titles as episode titles.
    • Cowboy Bebop used episode titles designed to be reminiscent of song titles (sometimes actual titles) or styles: "Waltz for Venus", "Jupiter Jazz", "Bohemian Rhapsody", "Mushroom Samba", etc. The finale was titled "The Real Folk Blues", also the name of the show's end Theme Tune, and the movie is called "Knockin' on Heaven's Door".
    • The chapters of the Cromartie High School manga were all references to song, albums, or lyrics. Similarly, the four volumes of the DVD in the American release were named after song and had covers parodying the names of albums.
    • Eureka Seven likewise uses variations of song titles for most of its episodes, with electronic music being the most common genre. AlternativeSoundtrack
    • Kyoto Animation's adaptation of Kanon used a classical music subgenre in each episode title, ending with "Kanon". Studio Toei's version used track titles from the original game.
    • Each chapter of The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service is titled after a song. They try to arrange it so that all the chapters in a particular tankoubon are songs by the same artist.
    • The Legend of Black Heaven uses the names of famous rock and roll songs as episode titles.
    • The episode names of Piano are Italian musical terms, starting with "con", which indicate how something should be performed—for example "con amore" (with love).
    • Every episode of Scrapped Princess starts with a musical movement style ("Elegy", "March", "Concerto", etc.) and usually ends with a short description of a major character to be introduced in that chapter.
    • While the individual episodes of Simoun weren't named idiosyncratically, the DVDs were, using musical terms: Choir of Pairs, Orchestra of Betrayal, Rondo of Loss, Crescendo of Lamentation, and Song of Prayer. It makes sense, since the teams of pilots that flew the titular aircraft were called chor (choir).
    • Hentai artist Black Dog names all of his Sailor Moon works after Stands from JoJo's Bizarre Adventure—all of which are themselves named after songs of bands from the 70s and 80s.
    • Shinyaku Ookami Ga Kuru uses song titles from Rammstein.
  • A handful of series strictly use only proper nouns by themselves.
    • Nearly every episode of s-CRY-ed is a proper noun, the name of some character, place or thing within the series, without any predicates or verbs.
    • Every chapter title of World Trigger is the name of the most relevant character in that chapter. This series is not afraid to use the same name repeatedly, in which case it becomes "(character name): Part 2," "(character name): Part 3," etc. The one exception so far has been "The Invasion."
  • The Hellsing manga uses (famous) game titles as their chapters, such as Warcraft or Final Fantasy.
  • Each episode of Genshiken has a long, convoluted, scholarly sounding title (e.g., "The Sublimating Effects of the Dissimilation Brought on Through Makeup and Costume on Mental Obstacles", an episode about cosplay, likely because Genshiken itself (or rather what its an abbreviation of) is a long scholarly sounding euphemism for "anime/manga fanclub."
  • Episodes of Galaxy Angel are phrased as titles to very strange recipes, such as "Milfeulle's Special made Cake for Surprise & Hug Hug Hug Pot," "Ambition and Poverty BBQ Chicken & Chain-linked Noodles without the Link" and "Dried Pork Legs & Top-Gun Fried Tofu mixed with Vegetables." Keep in mind that the series has Edible Theme Naming concerning the girls.
  • Princess Tutu, Rozen Maiden, and Elfen Lied all have episode titles in German. Each episode of Princess Tutu is also titled after the piece of classical music that's most prominent in the episode.
  • In Weiß Kreuz, episode titles begin with a single Gratuitous German word. Weiss Kreuz Gluhen, meanwhile, uses the titles of the Weiss's previously released Image Songs as episode titles.
  • Slayers like W.I.T.C.H., used the alphabet: Each episode in the original 26-ep season followed an alphabetical pattern. Each title was a short exclamation, followed by a longer explanation, and the exclamations were alphabetical: "Angry! Lina's Furious Dragon Slave!" is the opening, continuing with "Bad! Mummy Men Aren't My Type!" and so on, through "Zap! Victory Is Always Mine!"
    • This was dropped on Next and Try, but revived with Revolution ("AMAZING - The Astonishing Dragon Slave!?" to "MISTY - The Blades Are Brought Down!") and Evolution-R ("NEW COMER? A new adventure begins!" to "ZERO HOUR! Those heading to destruction!"), which had 26 episodes between them.
  • Cardcaptor Sakura's episodes all started with "Sakura and..." or "Sakura's..."
  • Tenchi Universe uses "No Need for..." as its episode titles, usually followed by a noun relating to the plot of the episode and an exclamation point. For instance, "No Need for Swimsuits!" was the episode focusing on the group's trip to a beach-like planet and the girls' subsequent entry into a bikini contest. This is significant because "Muyo" from the title of the OVA, Tenchi Muyo (and part of all the series' Japanese titles), literally means "No Need For" - in other words, "No Need for Tenchi". (Among several other meanings.)
    • Similarly, the original Japanese titles for Tenchi in Tokyo take on the form of haiku, which wasn't carried over in the English version.
  • Mahou Sensei Negima! had all of its titles in Latin in the first series anime. The second series anime's titles were all quotes from various characters.
  • Martian Successor Nadesico's Japanese episode titles were all references to cliche phrases or words in Anime that were relevant to the episode: for instance, the second episode's title could be translated "Leave 'The Blue Earth' to Me".
  • Up until season 5, nearly all of Detective Conan's titles would be "(insert victim/event) murder case".
  • The Law of Ueki episodes all are named "The Law of ___". Example: "Episode 16: The Law of the Awakening Organ".
  • Magikano episodes always ask a question. Example: "Are They Really Cursed Cat Panties?!"
  • Every episode of Samurai Champloo is written with four kanji that form a Yojijukugo (four-character idiomatic compound is one translation), which would never translate, so the dub uses alliteration (ex. "Bogus Booty", "Hell Hounds for Hire").
    • Even the plot uses Added Alliterative Appeal, as Fuu is seeking "the samurai who smells of sunflowers."
    • Additionally, multi-part episodes use "verse (number)" instead of "part (number)".
  • Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann uses a line of dialog from each episode as it's title. Each Story Arc uses a different character's dialog — first Kamina, then Nia, then Rossiu, and ultimately Simon. The episode titles are also written in a font appropriate to their speaker (Kamina and Simon's titles are in a graffiti style, Nia's are extremely cutesy, and Rossiu's are angular and futuristic.)
  • The So Bad, It's Good show Yoake Mae Yori Ruriiro Na Crescent Love started every episode with "The Princess": ex. "The Princess is here for a homestay?". The final episode was simply entitled "The Princess and...".
  • Tite Kubo tends to attach the same chapter names of Bleach to similar events.
    • Ichigo gets an important power-up? Death and Strawberry.
    • Ichigo and Rukia reunite? Deathberry Returns.
    • Ichigo is in his mindscape? First The Dark Side of the Universe, then Black and White.
    • Kenpachi is fighting? The Undead.
    • Ichigo using Kukaku Shiba's rocket? The Shooting Star Project.
    • Sad flashback? Memories in the Rain/Everything but the Rain.
  • The Japanese titles of all six episodes of FLCL are written with four katakana morae, possibly as an imitation of the yojijukugo style, but using abbreviated English (or nonsense) words in place of Japanese words.
  • Dai Mahou Touge episode titles tend to run on a bit. With two episodes per OVA, the preview screens are just filled with text.
  • Gunslinger Girl's episode titles are in Italian.
  • Every Chrono Crusade episode has two different titles: one in Japanese and one in English.
  • Every episode of Welcome to the NHK (and every chapter of the manga) is titled "Welcome to the _______!", which leads to such strange constructions as "Welcome to the Lolita!" and "Welcome to the no hope!"
    • The dub titles did away with the word 'the' when it seemed more appropriate, which made those titles just a little less awkward.
  • Episode titles in Mnemosyne always follow the pattern "subject negation verb". Excepting the final episode, "Then, to the Gates of the Kingdom".
  • Every episode title in El Cazador de la Bruja contains the word "Man" or "Woman", usually referring to the character in the focus of a particular episode. The only exception is episode 14, which is also the biggest continuous Mood Whiplash in the show.
  • Every original Japanese episode title of Madlax consists of two kanjis making a single word and an English word, which more or less precisely describe the events of the episode. Sadly, it was Lost in Translation.
  • The 24-episode version of Ah! My Goddess used "Ah! ____________" for all its titles, much less common in the original manga and its other adaptations.
  • Sgt. Frog (the anime version, specifically) uses the format of "[Character(s) who the episode is centered on], [Episode theme], de-arimasu".
    • Additionally, the English dub titles would always be parodies of or have references to popular phrases, songs, movies, TV shows, and video games.
  • Viewtiful Joe had "no Maki" or "Episode" fitting the theme of Viewtiful Joe as a Kamen Rider parody.
    • This convention is often used in comedy manga. Some specific examples are Dr. Slump (both the manga and anime), Kochikame, and the manga version of the aforementioned Sgt. Frog.
  • Lyrical Nanoha:
    • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha used to end its episode titles with "nano", meaning "it is" or "is it". For example, the first episode translates to "Is This a Mysterious Encounter?" and the second episode translates to "'Lyrical' is the Magic Word?" The series drops this practice mid-way into season two (starting with episode 9, "Christmas Eve"; and disregarding season one finale "Say My Name") and hasn't used it since.note 
    • Also, the various manga use different words for "chapter":
      • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha ViVid has "Memory;XX☆", a play on the words "vivid memory".
      • Magical Record Lyrical Nanoha Force has "Record XX:" followed by the chapter title. The chapter titles also come only in English.
      • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha Movie First The Comics uses "Sequence : X-Y", where X is the arc number, starting with 0.
      • The Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha A's manga uses "Report XX".
      • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha INNOCENT uses ""Duel XX"
      • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha StrikerS THE COMICS uses has the most elaborate naming system. The first two arcs, which are a prequel to the anime, have "Episode - XX [A's to StrikerS] Phase Y" and "Episode - XX [Starting Stars] Phase Z", respectively, where the numbering is not continuous between Y and Z. After the manga catches up to the anime's plot, it switches to "Episode - XX (Striker S #NN.5) followed by the chapter title, followed by the Roman numeral (II) for two-parters. The non-integer number indicates where the chapter fits between the anime's episodes. The final chapter, which takes place after the end of the anime, is simply titled "After Days [The After]" with no numbers at all.
  • The ARIA anime episode titles all begin with sono ("that") in Japanese. Given the differences in syntax, this is not always carried over in the English translations, though they usually manage to include that (or those) in the title.
  • Each episode of Black Cat uses the word "cat" in the title. Most of the titles are in the form of "The _____ Cat" or "A(n) _____ Cat", with the _____ being an adjective.
  • Except for the last one and the specials, Chobits titles tend to follow the formula "Chii <verbs>".
  • All the titles of Doujin Work's work episodes are some form of sexual joke or phrase.
    • Kanokon also uses something that sounds sexual for its episode titles.
    • DearS as well.
  • All episode titles in Blue Drop are scientific names of flowers.
  • Oruchuban Ebichu ends its titles with "dechu", a baby-speak version of "desu", which roughly translates as "it is".
  • Every Digimon Savers title (not carried over into Digimon Data Squad) is of the form, "[Excited Title! Two-Part Episode Name!]: [Hero or Monster of the Week Digimon] [does something]!" Such as "Recover the Bond between Parent and Child - Evilmon's Bewitchment," "Yoshino Gets Her Cinderella Story?! Chrysalimon's Shadow," or "Genius Tohma has Returned! Beat Meramon."
    • There's some of this in the other odd-numbered seasons, as well. (For some reason, it's only done with the odd-numbered ones.)
      • Digimon Tamers has two-sentence titles, either of which could serve as a title alone ("Crisis for Guilmon! The Adventure in my Town," "Protect the Light of the Town! Dangerous Camp of the Digimon," "The Order to Capture the Digimon! The Sinister Foreboding.")
      • Though not an unbreakable rule, Digimon Adventure tended to have titles of the form [Sentence!] [Name or reference]. "Lightning! Kabuterimon," "Roar! Ikkakumon," "Clash! The Freezing Digimon." The titles were also mercifully short, whether following the naming trend or not.
    • Almost all of the Digimon Frontier dub episode titles were clever manipulations of a popular catchphrase, idiom, or song title. Examples include: "Can't Keep a Gumblemon Down" (Can't keep a good man down); "Fear and Loathing in Los Arboles" (after the novel and movie Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas); and "Glean Eggs and Scram" (Green Eggs and Ham). Note the pilot episode is called "All Aboard" and the finale is "End of the Line".
  • Kaleido Star's episodes all have the word "sugoi" (which translates to "amazing") in the title, and are related to the main plot of the episode. For example, the very first episode is "Hajimete no! Sugoi! Stage" (or "First time! Amazing! Stage", which was titled "Amazing Stage Debut!" in the dub), and the fifteenth is "Utahime no Sugoi Ai" ("The Singing Princess' Amazing Love" or "The Diva's Amazing Love", which deals with the backstory of a character who works as a singer at the Kaleido Stage).
  • Each episode of Nerima Daikon Brothers starts with "Ore wa" or "My"...and, judging by the dub's translations of the episodes, they're often made to sound like vague innuendo.
  • Every episode of the anime version of Girls Bravo started or ended the title with "Bravo" and included a descriptor ("Bravo From the Bathroom!", "Bravo at School!", and "Cooking is Bravo!", to name the first three episodes). Given some of the titles, it begs the question: just what does Bravo mean...?as if it isn't obvious?
  • Almost every episode of Penguin Musume Heart is a thinly disguised spoof of another anime's title. Sample titles include "Mae, Otome", "Roze no Tsukaima", and "Marie-sama ga Miteru".
  • Dirty Pair Flash has a different naming pattern for each of its three parts:
    • The first part's episode titles are follow this pattern: <English adjective> Angel. (The last episode is titled "LovelyAngel".)
    • The second part's episode titles are in mixed Japanese and English, and contain at least one English word each.
    • The third part's episode titles follow this pattern: <color name in Japanese> ? <noun in Japanese> [<approximately the same noun in English>].
  • Kiddy Grade had the form of <word>/<usually related word>, except for episode 24. "Depth/Space" is an example.
  • Haibane Renmei has titles composed of three different nouns or phrases for every episode other than eight, such as "Cocoon — Dream of Falling From the Sky — Old Home" (From Episode one). Episode eight's title is just "The Bird."
  • Gundam X derives its titles from lines spoken within the episode, typically critical lines. Examples include "Can You See The Moon?" (said by Jamil Neate) for the first episode, "My Mount is Fierce" (said by Shagia Frost) for the episode introducing the major antagonists, and "The Moon Will Always Be There" (said by the narrator/D.O.M.E. for the finale.
  • Last Exile names its episodes after Chess terms.
  • Pokémon Special titles every chapter "VS. [Pokemon name]". The Pokemon name is always one that shows up in the chapter, usually fighting against the heroes, but sometimes not.
    • Most of the English-language anime episodes include the name of a plot-important Pokemon as part of a pun. Or some other pun relating to the episode's plot.
  • In Pet Shop of Horrors every chapter is named with a D word as if guessing what the D in Count D's name stands for.
  • Early chapters in the manga version of D.N.Angel start with "A Warning of _______", referencing the fact that Dark always sends warning letters before he steals something. This was dropped later in its run, and didn't carry over to the animated adaptation.
  • Hyakko drops the word "tiger" in every single episode title, since the title of the series is a reference to Byakko, the white tiger of The Four Gods.
  • Every episode/chapter of Pita-Ten is named "How to ________".
  • While the episode names of Baccano! can be seen as this due to their matter-of-fact, Exactly What It Says on the Tin nature, it's the Light Novels that really count, with each of their titles being based on rock bands.
    • Some of the books in the series also have idiosyncratic chapter naming: The Rolling Bootlegs name chapters by the time ("The First Day", "That Night", "The Second Day"), Children of the Bottle name chapters after alternating positive and negative emotions (Happiness, Angst, Delight, Anger), and Alice in Jails has chapters that always start with "Let's ___" ("Let's Go to Prison!", "Let's Eat Our Last Supper", "Let's Just Admit That This Is All Your Fault").
  • Since Michiko to Hatchin is set in Brazil (or a version of it), the episodes have Portuguese names.
  • Every chapter in Hayate × Blade has the word "baka" (idiot) in it somewhere, in reference to its eponymous Idiot Heroine.
  • Each chapter of the manga Yotsuba&! is of the form "Yotsuba to X" ("Yotsuba & X"), where X is the topic of the chapter. For example, the first chapter, where Yotsuba and her dad move into their new home, is "Yotsuba & Moving."
    • The sole exception is Chapter 14, which sees Yotsuba's neighbour Asagi get the title: "Asagi's Gifts". Appropriately enough, it focuses on Asagi and her family.
  • In Tiger & Bunny, the title of every episode except the last one is an English-language proverb or common English phrase.
  • Each episode of Mushishi is named using a poetic description of the effect the mushi of that episode has on humans.
  • Every chapter of the School Rumble manga bears the title of a movie, which is often (at least vaguely) related to the plot events of that chapter. For example, in volume 9 one may read such chapters as "#117 MRS.DOUBTFIRE" or side stories such as "b25 MONSTERS INC". The 'b' in that example is a musical flat symbol (♭); there have also been, oddly enough, chapters designated with a natural mark (♮).
  • Not only does the manga Kitchen Princess call each chapter a recipe, but the title chapters all follow the "Najika and [food]" pattern. The food mentioned is always one she makes in the chapter, even if it's tangential to the actual chapter's plot.
  • Every episode of Yoku Wakaru Gendai Mahou is named after a computer programming term. Sample episode titles include "hello, world", "Dragon Book" and "jini".
  • In Maburaho, every episode title was a verb in past tense (in Japanese, always ending with "~ちゃった……"). The official English translations took some liberties and made this pattern somewhat less noticeable.
  • Umineko: When They Cry numbers each episode "episode x-y." This presumably was fine in the visual novels, but in the anime, this gets a little confusing; if someone says, for example, "Episode 2," are they referring to the second 23-minute episode, or the second arc?
    • Alongside this, each episode's name is a reference to chess, with the episodes that mark the ending of a particular "arc" named after types of checkmates.
    • Regarding the visual novels, every new release is titled "_____ of the Golden Witch" (Legend, Turn, Banquet, Alliance, End, Dawn, Requiem and Twilight).
  • Sayonara Zetsubo Sensei's chapter titles are not "_______ has left me in despair!" as one would expect, but paraphrased or Punny Name versions of quotes and titles of various novels.
  • Gintama is full of this. Episode titles are generally whole sentences (if not paragraphs), often things like "When you're tired, eat something sour!" or "A life without gambling is like sushi without wasabi." They often constitute a bit of Fridge Logic, since they seem completely random until you really think about the episode. (Some are a bit more obvious though.)
  • Argento Soma's episode names are two words that progress from each other. "Rebirth and Death", "Death and the Maiden", "The Maiden and the Meeting", etc. It comes full circle with the last episode.
  • Tokyo Mew Mew's episode titles all end in "nya~!"
  • The anime based on the Sands of Destruction video game has all of its episode titles begin with "There are Two Kinds" (except for Ep. 10: "There Are 108 Laws of Clockwork Robotics").
  • Spice and Wolf's episodes are all named "Wolf and..." with the rest of the title referring to elements of the episode.
  • Karin's episode titles always end in "is so embarrassing", sometimes to the point of sounding like a "Blind Idiot" Translation.
  • The Japanese episodes of Transformers Armada were all in the form "Word in Kanji (Other Word in Hiragana) - title of the english version, which is also different".
  • Change 123's chapter titles are always some kind of mathematical term.
  • Bokurano just has the current Zearth pilot's name followed by a number as titles.
  • Likewise, the Bakemonogatari anime has the name of the girl attacked, followed by the name of the monster, followed by the number of the episode in the story arc, as titles.
  • Bakuman。 always names its chapters "X and Y", like "Dreams and reality", "A smile and a blush", "Friends and rivals",...
  • Baka and Test: Summon the Beasts episode titles follow the same pattern as the series title "X and Y and Z" (Ex. Maps and Treasure and Striker Sigma V)
    • For the first ten episodes of season 2, "X" is "boku" (the first person pronoun Akihisa uses) for most of the episodes, with episode 8 using "uchi" instead (since the episode is focused on Minami's past). In episode 11, "X and Y" are "Yuuji and Shouko" since it's another flashback.
    • Both season finales are named after the show itself (Idiots, Test, and Summoned Beasts)
  • Ladies Versus Butlers! also mirrors the series name with the episodes all being "X Versus Y"
  • All episode titles of Nanatsuiro Drops have the word 'color' somewhere in it.
  • Chis Sweet Home begins every episode title with the titualar character's name and a comma, resulting in ungrammatical titles such as "Chi, Frolics About," and "Chi, Goes Outside." The passive voice is often used to shoehorn titles into the naming convention, as in, "Chi, Is Invited In." The English translation of the manga changes it to "a cat [does something]".
  • Black Butler episode titles are all "His Butler, _______"
  • Shinryaku! Ika Musume chapters are all questions or requests like "May I Invade You?" or "Aren't you burnt?". The reason being that in Japanese all the chapter titles end in "naika", with 'ika' in katakana. Ika means squid, and the main character is basically a squid-girl, so......
  • Although it's not apparent from the English translation, all episodes titles of Kemonozume contain references to taste and various flavors. (The first episode is titled "The First Taste" and the last one is "The Flavor Doesn't Matter.")
  • I My Me! Strawberry Eggs does this on two levels: Each episode title has something to do with makeup (appropriately enough), and each DVD volume is called a "Quarter".
  • The title of each chapter of Yankee-kun to Megane-chan is a quote from that chapter.
  • Highschool of the Dead replaces a word in famous names and titles with dead, eg. The Girl Next Dead, Dead Storm Rising, and so on.
  • All 24 episodes of Love Hina have (Japanese) titles that end with "na", in several cases actually being part of a word.
  • Several of the later episodes of Macross Frontier are named for songs from the show. In three cases ("Triangular", Diamond Crevasse", and "Blue Ether"), the song is used as the ending theme.
  • The arcs of Higurashi: When They Cry are in the format of "two-kanji word" + shi-hen: (Onikakushi, Watanagashi, Tatarigoroshi, Himatsubushi, Meakashi, Tsumihoroboshi, Minagoroshi, Matsuribayashi).
  • Ore no Imouto ga Konna ni Kawaii Wake ga Nai! (My Little Sister Can't Be This Cute!) follows variations of "My Little Sister Can't Be ________!" for every episode.
  • Every episode title of Puella Magi Madoka Magica is taken from a line of dialogue in said episode.
  • Every chapter in Ame Nochi Hare is suffixed with hPa, which stands for hectopascal, and is used by meteorologists as a unit of measurement for air pressure. This is relevant to the plight of the five protagonists who will transform into girls whenever it rains.
  • A Channel has a regular title in Japanese, and a second title in English that always starts with an "A".
  • Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex employed two conventions. The first was that each episode (in the Japanese iteration) had an English title and a Japanese title, the English title being all caps and often only vaguely relevant to the episode at hand, while the Japanese title is more descriptive. The other convention is that in the first season they label each episode as a Standalone episode (title screen green) or a Complex episode (title screen blue), to show whether or not they fall into the overlying arc of the first season, while in 2nd Gig, they label they episodes as Individual, Dividual, or Dual, to show that episode's relation to the arc.
  • Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai uses the characters for the show's own canonical portmanteau name — "Haganai" (はがない), itself derived from "Boku wa Tomodachi ga Sukunai ("wa" and "ha" are interchangeable in Japanese) — on its episode titles, followed by a ShiftJIS emoticon frequently seen on Japanese Message Boards.
  • Rosario + Vampire uses the hella predictable + sign in the name to make it's episodes. X + Vampire.
  • The episode titles of Saiunkoku Monogatari are all common proverbs. During the first season, someone always Title Dropped the proverb in dialogue, though the practice was mostly abandoned for the second season (probably because of how forced some of the Title Drops were).
  • The anime adaptation of Daily Lives of High School Boys have all skits' names start with "High School Boys and..."
  • Ben-To uses the name of a bento box featured in its respective episode, followed by its calorie count. For example, Episode 1 is called "Sticky Natto Okra Rice with Cheese Topping Bento, 440kcal"
  • Maji De Watashi Ni Koi Shinasai uses the form of "Seriously _______!" ("Maji de _____ nasai!")
  • The World God Only Knows has every title be some sort of reference, with the topic changing every few chapters. For example, part of the Ayumi re-capture arc used the names of Westerns.
  • To Love-Ru Darkness has every title fit into "Topic in English~A Flowery Description About Said Topic in Japanese~", except for the first four chapters (which repeat the same thing in English and Japanese) and the prologue (which is called "Prologue~Prologue and Activation~"). An example is "Past~Memories Leading to Tomorrow~".
  • Every episode of Lotte no Omocha includes the name of a punctuation mark: exclamation, semicolon, parentheses, etc. (That and a few suspiciously shaped objects leads one to suspect a typography fetish is at work here.)
  • Every Mirai Nikki anime episode title is in some way related to phones.
  • Rinne no Lagrange puts "Kamogawa", the name of the main setting for the series, in all episode titles. This continued into season two.
  • Through all 4 seasons of The Familiar of Zero every episode is "X no Y" ("X's Y", or "[The] Y of X"): following the pattern of the series title itself (Zero no Tsukaima/The Familiar of Zero).
  • Omamori Himari uses either the kanji, katakana, or hiragana for "cat" (猫, ネコ, ねこ) in its chapter/episode title. Also, the chapters themselves are called "menageries".
  • K has all of its episode titles begin with the letter K, except for the 12th, which features it as a character's middle initial.
  • All episode titles in Glass Fleet are similes, always going "Like (something)".
  • One Piece episodes usually follow an "Excited Episode Title! Inquisitive Subtitle?" format.
    • There are also some themes within the titles of the certain chapters. Whenever the crew arrives on a new island, the title will typically be "Adventure in/on ________". For example, "Adventure in the Kingdom of Sand", "Adventure on God's Island", and "Adventure in the Great Prison". This doesn't apply to locations where there is no actual adventuring, though.
    • Whenever the crew officially gains a new member, the chapter will usually be called "The (First, Second, etc.) Person". On some occasions, this doesn't occur when the crew member initially joins. For example, Nami's "The Second Person" chapter is after Sanji's "The Fourth Person" because she had temporarily betrayed the crew, only to join for real later on. So far, the only members not to continue this trend were Chopper and Robin.
  • To fit with the Long Title of Problem Children are Coming from Another World, aren't they?, all its episode titles seem to be lengthy question-mark-terminated sentences?
  • Every episode title of Mashiro-iro Symphony has something to do with colors. Most are of the form "X-colored Y," where X and Y are things that have no obvious meaning in this context: "Annoyance-Colored Anxiety," "Search-Colored Bath Time," etc.
  • All the episode titles for Little Busters! come from a line said in the episode itself, usually by the character the episode focuses on, and the titles are shown at the end of each episode rather than at the beginning.
  • Almost all the episode titles of Chuunibyou Demo Koi ga Shitai! have for some reason an ellipsis (...) in them, save for the last two. That's probably because Rikka is forced to grow out of her delusions in those episodes.
  • The episode titles from Is This a Zombie? are responses to the question "Is this a zombie?" like "Yes, I'm a Magical Garment Girl", "No, I'm a Vampire Ninja", etc.
  • Soul Eater titles have two parts: a regular title, followed by a sub-title, which is always asked as a question i.e. "I Am the Star! The Big Man Is Showing Up Here?"
  • The English titles of Space Dandy end with the word "baby".
  • All episode titles in Death Note are single words written as two kanji, except for the final two.
  • The episode titles of [C] – Control start with the letter C, like "Cultivation", "Collapse", and "Conspiracy".
  • Black★Rock Shooter uses lyrics from the song Black★Rock Shooter, like "How Much Louder Do I Have To Shout?" and "The Hope From Where It Shouldn't Have Existed".
  • The first Hunter × Hunter anime episodes all follow the scheme of "(word) X (word)" or "(word) X (word) X (word)." The manga will often also use single-word titles towards the end of story arcs or the exact day the chapters take place if there is a deadline.
  • The episodes in Kill la Kill are named after classic J-Pop songs.

    Idiosyncratic Episode NamingLiterature

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