Doorstopper / Literature

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  • Marienbad My Love by Mark Leach claims to be the world's longest novel, weighing in at over 100 million characters, 17 million words, over 10,000 pages and 65 pounds across 17 volumes. Even more: the novel's title is 6,700 words long. It contains a 4.4-million-letter noun, "The Holy Jah" for short, as well as a 3 million-word-long sentence.
  • Artamène ou le Grand Cyrus is 13,095 pages in 10 parts of 3 volumes each and approximately 1.95 million words long, and was the former top of Wikipedia's list of longest novels.
  • Ayn Rand is infamous for writing these, especially since her most famous novel, Atlas Shrugged fills up over fifty pages with a monologue from one of the novel's heroes. Atlas must have Shrugged because he was tired of carrying the Writer on Board.
  • Battle Royale is 619 pages long, and it's mostly about students killing each other.
  • Devta, a work serialised in a Pakistani suspense magazine for 33 years and spanning 11.2 million (Urdu) words in 56 volumes, or about 200,000 per volume; formerly on the Wikipedia list before someone pointed out that serials weren't counted. Details on the work in English are scarce, though it apparently focuses on a man who gains telepathic powers.
  • The Gone books. While average sized for most adult novels, at 500 to 600 pages apiece, the books are gigantic for young adult novels. They are steadily decreasing in length as the series draws to its conclusion, however.
  • The omnibus editions of Discworld (collecting three novels on a theme, such as three about the Lancre Witches, Rincewind, or the gods) do tend to be this. From about Going Postal, the individual novels are over 500 pages. Snuff is about the same thickness as an omnibus of The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic.
  • Henry Darger wrote several monumental examples while toiling in obscurity as a janitor.
  • John MacGregor, an art historian with a psychology degree, published a 720-page oversized book about Darger's life and work; In the Realms of the Unreal. Crammed with Mac's own speculations and ramblings, it's quite a doorstopper in its own right.
  • The complete, collected adventures of Sherlock Holmes (four novels and five story collections, written over a period of about 40 years) amount to over 1200 very large pages of very small text.
  • More or less anything by Neal Stephenson after he gained any success.
    • Anathem is 1000 pages long, complete with a glossary, 3 appendices, and, in the promo copy sent to reviewers and book stores, actual, factual Feelies.
    • Cryptonomicon. The fact that it's printed in a small typeface is a telling indication that you should be grateful that it's only 918 pages long. Some printings break the four-digit mark, coming in at 1054 pages. Latin America, thankfully, saw it released as three separate tomes.
    • Similarly, any volumes of his Baroque Cycle, which each top 900 pages (admittedly because Stephenson really wanted either one enormous book or 8 novels, and instead we get a trilogy with each book containing 2-3 of the 'novels'). And if you want to see a real Door Stopper, Stephenson's handwritten manuscript (on display at the Science Fiction Museum in Seattle) is taller than he is.
    • Lampshaded in The Baroque Cycle where one character mentions using the in-universe Cryptonomicon (a text on cryptography) to hold a door open.
    • Reamde. This door stopper clocks in at 1044 pages.
    • Seveneves is actually a slight departure from his record, but still a very heavy volume at 861 pages.
  • All of Ken Follett's historical epics, including The Pillars of the Earth, its sequel World Without End, and the two (so far) books of The Century Trilogy. World Without End is the worst offender in this regard, clocking in over 1200 pages in paperback, perhaps fitting the book's title.
  • Although the books are average in length individually, the Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, combining all the novels, is 832 pages long.
  • Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series is a sprawling epic of doorstoppers, 14 in all, ranging from 530 to 900 pages each. In all, the series has about 11,500 pages and 4.3 million words, not counting the relatively short standalone prequel.
  • Brandon Sanderson's get larger as time goes on. Words of Radiance clocks in at 1088 pages, the maximum the publisher is physically capable of printing (the original title was The Book of Endless Pages, named after an in-universe book, but his editor thought it was a bit on the nose considering its length). Sanderson mentions in one interview that he outlines each TSA book the same way he outlines a trilogy of regular books. He also jokes about the Doorstopper-ness of his own books in the Alcatraz Series, when the First-Person Smartass narrator suggests that you could use one of his books to deliver a Tap on the Head to forget something.
  • George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire books are often split into several novels that each look pretty sizable in their own right.
  • Dune by Frank Herbert (though the second installment, Dune Messiah, is an exception). There's an omnibus edition of the first three novels, called "The Great Dune Trilogy". With appendices etc., it clocks in at a reasonable 912 pages.
    • The first book is often printed on bible-style thin paper, with a small font size. If you buy the rest of the books from the same publisher, more often than not, the first book doesn't stand out in size. Indeed, it is often at size parity with Dune Messiah and smaller than Children of Dune. Pick it up, however, and you'll be surprised at its weight.
      • Get it in large print and laugh helplessly as it tears a hole through your bag like a brick through wet tissue paper!
    • The first book was originally conceived and serialized (in Analog magazine) as two separate novels, Dune World and The Prophet of Dune. The book seamlessly combines both texts and adds a whole wad of appendices.
      • Dune Messiah (serialized in Galaxy) is actually only slightly shorter than the first two serials, but ended up being published as a standalone. Children of Dune (back to Analognote ) had much bigger installments, often leaving space for only a handful of short stories and articles.
    • According to legend, when the Dune film was being developed, the first draft of the screenplay, written by Frank Herbert himself, was the size of a phone book...
  • All of J. K. Rowling's written work between Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Career of Evil was at least 400 pages long. The streak was finally broken with the published script for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (304 pages); though this is justified by it being a film script rather than a novel, and 300+ pages is still extremely hefty for a script.
    • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix in particular (the longest in the series, at 700-800+ pages depending on the edition) certainly qualifies as this; Goblet of Fire and Deathly Hallows are fairly substantial and almost as long. Half-Blood Prince as well, though it's not quite as long as the the others mentioned but still over 500 pages. It's especially funny when you read that one of the excuses publishers used when repeatedly rejecting the first book of the series (clocking in at a fairly "slim" 300-odd pages) was "it's too long and kids won't read long books."
    • Lampshaded in Return of the Bunny Suicides, where a bunny orders Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix so that it can wait under the mail slot and be killed when the book drops on its head.
    • A common joke around the time due to the size and print demand was saying book 6 (if larger than Order of the Phoenix; it wasn't) would be called Harry Potter and the End of Trees. This actually prompted J. K. Rowling to insist that every edition of Deathly Hallows contain at least 30% recycled fiber.
    • In 2015, a fully illustrated version of the first book in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone was published, and it's actually heavier than the hardcover of Phoenix. And there are plans to publish fully illustrated versions of the latter titles in the series too. One imagines they may have to split them because otherwise, whew.
  • Moby-Dick attempted to be a lot of things about whales, including a food blog, a bestiary, a travelogue, history and oh, a story with a plot. It also delves into geography, philosophy, religion, race relations, the nature of civilization versus savagery... There are some scholars who think Melville intended the book to be an encyclopedia of everything he knew. An abridged version for kids probably fits onto ten pages - the ratio should be a record for any doorstopper in this list.
  • J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings (internally divided into Book I-VI and Appendices) has about 1000 pages. Its size, conjoined with the post-war paper shortages, was one of the factors contributing to it being Divided for Publication (split into three volumes, two "books" to each) to reduce the financial risk for the publisher.
    • Technically it is six books and an appendix volume. The hardcover anniversary set, which is divided into seven volumes, can actually stop a door, as can the new 1178 page single-volume edition.
    • The Silmarillion and The Hobbit both avert this, running slightly over and slightly under 350 pages respectively. The Silmarillion makes up for it by being incredibly dense and hard to read, even for the more avid fans.
  • Anything written by the author Tad Williams end up like this.
    • To Green Angel Tower was so big, it had to be split into two parts when printed as a mass-market paperback.
    • The Memory, Sorrow and Thorn trilogy was released as twelve volumes in Finland.
    • The Otherland series of which there are four volumes.
  • Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky is well over 500 pages.
    • One edition of The Brothers Karamazov is 720 pages long.
    • Penguin Classics' edition of The Brothers K is (with around 12 pages of notes at the end) 1,013 pages long due to its more detailed, faithful translation.
  • Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace, famously so. In fact, the adjective "tolstoy"note  has become the Russian language's word for a Door Stopper-y book. Late-19th century Russian authors like Tolstoy and Dostoevsky were paid by the page, hence the length of their works. It's also worth noting that many of these books were published in serial installments, so the authors were not thinking in terms of one collected volume when the stories were written.
    • This is the subject of a joke from the Black Dog Games Factory game Human Occupied Landfill. The Dickens Boys (killer librarians) wear "War and Peace armour" because "nothing can get through War and Peace".
  • Konstantin Simonov's The Living and The Dead and Mikhail Sholokhov's Quiet Don are even more doorstopperrific.
  • The Gulag Archipelago (by Alexandr Solzhenitsyn), on the other hand, clocks in at 1,930 pages split across three volumes, the latter two of which appear to be out of print, while the first volume and an abridged one-volume edition remain in print. (Has this happened for any other books?)
    • Speaking of Solzhenitsyn: The Red Wheel, a multi-volume epic. It is sixteen volumes long, which count 6600 pages in total. And he was going to write four more volumes.
  • Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series. Eleven of the buggers, though the last three are a lot shorter than the others. The second one takes the cake; it can clock in at just shy of 1,000 pages, and some editions go well over.
  • The later books of Stephen King's epic The Dark Tower. The last two books are 800 and 1,100 pages, respectively. A lot of King's other books could fit this as well, especially the uncut version of The Stand, which is 1,153 pages with 400 extra pages added back in.
    • In Holland, a woman pressed charges against a mail company because a copy of King's IT killed her chihuahua when it dropped through the mail chute. The hardcover copy of IT is 1,135 pages long.
    • Under the Dome is a Doorstopper.
    • Tommyknockers, Tommyknockers fell on the floor. Made a hole where there wasn't one before.
    • Insomnia could practically serve as a cure for that particular malady, being thick enough to knock the sufferer unconscious.
    • King himself has made light of the fact that his books tend to be long. When he announced that he would go into semi-retirement, he claimed that he had "killed enough trees".
  • The Canterbury Tales. Notably, it's still a Doorstopper even though Chaucer was a long way from completing it when he died. Each pilgrim was supposed to tell four stories: not all of them got to tell one, and none of them got past their first. However, it's only a Doorstopper when it's kept in verse. A prose edition is about 370 pages.
  • A Suitable Boy, by Vikram Seth. Some editions run more than 1500 pages.
  • Mission Earth, a dekalogy note  by L. Ron Hubbard. The hardcover pressing of the book's volumes add up to 3,992 pages. Folks, that's longer than all of The Lord of the Rings (1,178 pages) and AKIRA (2,182 pages) combined, with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (607 pages in the original U.K. pressing) thrown in for good measure.
  • Pandora's Star and Judas Unchained by Peter F. Hamilton, each clocking in at around 1,200 pages (in paperback). One wonders why he didn't just make it a trilogy.
    • The same author's Void Trilogy—three books of 1200+ pages each. Really, though, the first two are more like one book. Trust the voice of experience.
      • Hamilton seems incapable of finishing his books properly (good books tho'). His only "ends" are the ends of series. Only The Evolutionary Void seems to avoid this.
    • The Night's Dawn Trilogy in the States had to be broken up into 6 volumes for its original print run (though still billed as a trilogy). The second US print and international versions had three books of 1200+ pages each; buy the complete trilogy and you'll need a truck to get it home.
    • Hamilton's 2012 standalone Great North Road is vast even by his usual standards, weighing in at over 1000 pages in hardback. By comparison, the Void Trilogy hardbacks had ~700. It didn't pick up the Fan Nickname "Great Big Book" for nothing.
  • All four books in Christopher Paolini's Inheritance series, with the final book, Inheritance, reaching the upper extremes of the 800 page-range. This was after it was broken off from its first half, Brisingr, which was over 700 pages long. Stitching them back together results in the true "Book Three" of the "Inheritance Trilogy" being over 1500 pages long.
  • Four of the six books of James Clavell's "Asian Saga" are over 1000 pages long, including Shogun. The other two (as it happens, the first two to be written) are over 500.
  • Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. 1,079 pages, including 96 pages of footnotes. Infinite indeed.
    • And woe betide you if you skip the footnotes; important plot points occur there, so if you don't read them and read them carefully, you'll be hopelessly lost. (If you do read them, you will also be lost, but not hopelessly.)
  • Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon mixes Door Stopper (760 pages) with Mind Screw for a tome you will not be able to finish. (Which is why it didn't win the Pulitzer Prize — half the committee wanted it to win, the other half couldn't finish it.)
    • Pynchon's later novels Mason & Dixon and Against the Day are 784 and 1104 pages, respectively.
    • His first, V., is a bit more concise at 533 pages.
  • Les Misérables by Victor Hugo — which its fans have (affectionately!) dubbed "The Brick", and has caused many to wonder if he was paid by the word.
    • In one section, Hugo describes, in lavish detail (well, lavish might not fit) a crack in the wall, through which a character looks. This description takes up at least a page and a half. In the condensed version
    • The unabridged version contains a 50-page essay on the battle of Waterloo. The reveal that is important to the plot appears on the last page.
    • Another essay is about Parisian Sewers, including history and network. Again, it becomes relevant later in the plot.
    • Hugo spends at least 50 pages near the beginning describing a picnic with Fantine and her friends that has no bearing on the rest of the plot.
    • The book opens with several chapters describing the life of the Bishop of Digne, all of which could have been summed up with the sentence "the Bishop was a good man". Indeed, far clearer and more succinct characterization is done in the two minutes he's onstage in the musical adaptation than in this entire section. We don't actually meet the protagonist of the story (Jean Valjean) until the end of this section, when he enters Digne (the village where the Bishop lives).
  • Anything by James A. Michener, notably Centennial. 1200 pages. Mr. Michener's writing is entertaining, but it's true that his later books should be under the by-line "James Michener and his Research Team".
    • His books also tend to span a large number of characters and/or time periods, so there are some nicely isolated sections, even if you lose some of the recurring themes from doing so. You might not be able to take a small part out of Space too easily, but some chapters of The Source can be taken out to (say) get a class full of high school students to get a feel for David's Israel and just how much sleuth work archaeologists have done on it.
  • Pretty much any fiction work that Tom Clancy has ever written has exceeded 400 pages, and sometimes by a healthy degree.
  • Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series contains no novel of less than 200,000 words, which at a minimum means 600 pages.
  • At 1.5 million words, Marcel Proust's À la Recherche du Temps Perdu, note  holds the Guinness Book of Records title as Longest Novel. Monty Python's Flying Circus did a sketch on summarizing the whole thing in 15 seconds.
    • And Proust was still adding to it and revising the last three volumes at the time of his death. One can only imagine how long the novel would have become if Proust had finished it to his liking.
  • The Shelters of Stone could be at least 200 pages shorter by the judicious use of the sentence, "And Ayla introduced herself again." Every time she meets someone she has to tell her whole backstory. Another few hundred, if you'd leave out the sex scenes. But then, the books wouldn't have become the best sellers they were. You could chop a good 50 pages off of the series just by omitting all descriptions of genitals.
    • The Land of Painted Caves, the sixth and final novel in the series, would be half as long if Ayla hadn't introduced herself, explained her backstory, and explained how she got Wolf every time she met someone new, and if every cave wasn't described in minute detail despite them all being fairly similar.
  • The Sword of Shannara was a painfully long rip off of The Lord of the Rings. The later books in the series were thankfully shorter and more original. This is because Sword of Shannara is the entire Lord of the Rings as one book with a sword instead of a ring as the Plot Device.
  • Ditto for the Iron Tower Trilogy, which is an even more blatant ripoff homage of Lord of the Rings than the above, when packaged as one book.
  • Imajica, by Clive Barker, also had to be split into two volumes when released as a paperback. On the second printing. The first printing that was in one single book fairly quickly split itself into two volumes.
  • Eiji Yoshikawa's Musashi, a fictionalized version of the life of Miyamoto Musashi, is 970 pages long, typically printed on unusually thin paper or as three separate volumes. It was originally a multi-year newspaper serial.
  • Several of Charles Dickens's novels are massive due to their origin as serials. Dave Barry once gave a joke etymology about "hurting like the dickens" being representative of the pain of having the entirety of the writings of Charles Dickens (consisting of voluminous volumes, considering how prolific the guy was) dropped on someone from a window. Among Dickens's fourteen completed novels, eight - The Pickwick Papers, Nicholas Nickleby, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and Son, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Little Dorrit, and Our Mutual Friend - are well over 800 pages in most editions; some are over 1000 pages with annotations and footnotes.note 
  • The Black Library, the publisher for Warhammer 40,000 fiction, tends to produce "omnibuses", which are collections of novels gathered into large, and, fittingly for the franchise, lethally heavy volumes. These include:
    • The Space Wolves Omnibus.
    • The SoulDrinkers Omnibus
    • Sandy Mitchell's Ciaphas Cain omnibuses Hero of the Imperium and Defender of the Imperium.
    • Three Gaunt's Ghosts omnibuses (by Dan Abnett) titled The Founding, The Saint and The Lost.
    • The Black Library also has Warhammer Fantasy fiction and has several omnibuses there too, among others is Gotrek and Felix, and Malus Darkblade.
  • The Dragonlance Trilogy has been combined into a single doorstopper. The Annotated Dragonlance is even worse because of all the, y'know, annotations and stuff.
  • The Collected Works of William Shakespeare clocks in at 1448 pages. Very thin pages, everything double-columned. This is why in many times any "complete works" of his get separated into multiple volumes.
  • The original novel of The Princess Bride is stated in character to be William Goldman's "good bits" abridgment of a 1000 page novel.
  • The novel ...And Ladies of the Club is over 1,000 pages long, supposedly took the author over 50 years to write, and is about, well, the founding members of a ladies book club in Ohio from post-Civil War to the 1930's. It's much more readable than it sounds.
  • Philip K. Dick's unfinished Exegesis was said to be around 8,000 pages long before he died. Eight thousand. note 
  • Alexandre Dumas in general is almost king of this trope:
    • The Count of Monte Cristo. The original, unabridged novel, printed on flimsy paper and in small type, produces an over-sized paperback volume a good four inches thick. Dumas was originally paid by the word for the original serial novel (published by chapter in the newspaper) and he made the most of it.
    • The Three Musketeers is only one of three books that comprise the "D'Artagnan Romances"— the other two being Twenty Years After which takes place... well, twenty years after the first... and the Vicomte of Bragellone. They're all over 600 pages each, meaning the entire three-volume set would run a whopping 2000 pages.
  • Mervyn Peake's Gormenghast novels are available in omnibus form, which is in the neighbourhood of 1000 pages of novel and 150-odd of critical essays. He had planned to write seven volumes, but couldn't finish them.
  • Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur is over 900 pages, divided into 507 chapters, admittedly short ones by modern standards.
  • The Complete Works of Plato, in an incredibly small type-face, clock at just under 2000 pages on a page size just under A4. This is without any Footnotes or annotations.
  • The Honor Harrington books by David Weber. They start at 300 pages of character development, climax, cleanup (and lots of death), and spiral into 900+ page space soap operas filled with dating troubles, feudal succession, poker games and political intrigue. And that's abridged versions! War of Honor, ticking at 800+ pages as it is, had the whole subplot about Esther McQueen's rebellion cut out from the draft. It was later published as a separate novella. The series then split into three branches, each one dealing with various sub plots happening at roughly the same time. Each one a doorstopper in its own right, and the only way to know everything is to read them all.
  • The Twilight series, especially the later books. Breaking Dawn takes the cake at 752 pages.
    • See also Stephenie Meyer's The Host for adults.
  • Sir Richard Francis Burton's translation of the Arabian Nights — sixteen massive volumes. The Project Gutenberg .txt files together weigh in at nearly 14 megabytes of text! It is said that no one cannot read all of it in one sitting because the reader will go insane from the sheer majesty of it all. What more likely happened is that the person goes insane from the extreme sleep deprivation from reading the massive series.
    • The earliest manuscripts of the Arabian Nights, from the 13th century, contained a manageable 20 stories or so, all folktales, divided into less than 300 nights. The editors of 18th- and 19th-century Egyptian versions, driven to "complete" the 1001 nights, kept adding a mishmash of folktales from various sources, erotic stories, literary works, legends, until the result was a sprawling, heterogeneous monster.
  • Don Quixote (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra is quite long, since it was originally two volumes which are now usually printed together.
  • Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell is just over 1000 pages.
  • James Ellroy's L.A. Confidential is just barely short of 500 pages, but is still pretty fast paced with its Loads and Loads of Characters all ending up with some important role in the story. His next book, White Jazz, was originally around 700 pages. When the publisher asked Ellroy to trim it down, he responded by removing every single word that could even remotely be considered extraneous, resulting in a 350-something page book which is insanely dense and has to be read incredibly carefully. There's even a few conversations where it takes quite a while to get any hints outside of the dialogue itself about who's talking.
  • James Joyce's Ulysses - nearly 1000 pages with notes, and you'd better believe you need them.
  • Miyuki Miyabe's Brave Story is, at least in its English translation, 816 pages. Sadly, it takes until page 222 to really get into the story proper. And, like the Harry Potter books, this is also a kid's book (more or less).
  • Any one book of Colleen McCullough's Masters of Rome series is quite an intimidating sight, and the series is now seven books and counting. They're not quite as bad as they look due to the sizeable introductions, afterwards, and glossaries, but each story is still 950-1050 pages.
  • Any book by Edward Rutherfurd, an author who likes, in all his books, to start at day one and move up through the millennia of whatever area he is currently writing about. Historical fiction, very heavy on the details and that in turn makes very heavy doorstoppers. The paperback edition of his novel The Forest is 883 pages long and the paperback edition of London is a whopping 1299 pages!
  • Any Norton Anthology of... well, of anything. The print is microscopic, and yet they could still be used as bludgeons. The Norton Anthology of English Literature (Volume 1) in paperback runs to 2518 pages of thin paper, not counting indexes and appendices.
    • The Norton Introduction to Literature: the shorter tenth edition is still 1844 pages.
  • In France, the immensely prestigious critical editions of the Bibliothèque de la Pléiade should be this... However, the print is tiny, and the pages are Bible paper, which means that although you do get a huge amount of text, they probably wouldn't make very good door-stoppers...
  • Most of Melanie Rawn's works. She just doesn't do less than 800 pages in paperback with 8 point type, which just might be why you've never heard of her. Both Dragon Prince and Dragon Star are trilogies of incredible length, with a frustrating number of similarly-named characters. Not works for the faint of heart, or sound of mind.
  • Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. To the point that internet reviewers use it to simulate "Death-by-hitting-yourself-with-a-book".
  • Many classic Chinese novels are in the 2000-page rangenote , though most editions are split into volumes:
  • Clarissa by Samuel Richardson. At 1,500+ pages, it is the longest published novel originally written in English.
  • The Tale of Genji. Its length varies by language and translator, but one copy is a set of 2 doorstoppers in small print. The Other Wiki gives a good example of length: the cast list has over 400 characters.
    • One copy is 1090 pages long, with thin paper, small type and the occasional illustration.
  • Vikram Chandra's very good crime thriller epic Sacred Games is the novel equivalent of a Bollywood movie. (Over 1080 pages.)
  • Most of Wayne Johnston's novels are doorstoppers - The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is over 600 pages... in trade paperback, and they look much longer than that in hardcover. And they are very heavy to lift.
  • Sharon Penman's The Sunne in Splendour, which is at least 1000 pages long and de-villainises King Richard III, turning him into a sympathetic protagonist who adores his wife Anne Neville. It also gives readers an inside look at the shifting loyalties and political intrigue of the Wars of the Roses.
  • The Great Book of Amber, by Roger Zelazny, is actually ten fairly small books making up the entirety of The Chronicles of Amber series. However, unless you're prepared to search, this is the only version actually available and has been the only one in print for years, except for the two-volume book club edition. Clocks in at somewhere around 1200 pages if I'm not mistaken. All the more irritating because neither the omnibus nor the individual novels are available as ebooks. If you want to read it, you're required by the publisher to carry around an unwieldy paperback.
  • If you'd print out the web-published Alternate History Decades of Darkness, you'd need more than 1800 sheets of paper (using an average-sized font and paper).
  • The Chung Kuo series of science fiction novels by David Wingrove. First published as eight hefty volumes of 600-700 pages each, it is due to be re-released in 2010 as eighteen books of presumably more reasonable size. It is eighteen because the original series was supposed to be nine books, but Wingrove's publisher refused to publish the ninth, forcing him to combine the last two books. The new release will include the complete nine books at two volumes per book...
  • The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser; over 1000 pages of verse poetry. And, like Chaucer, he didn't get close to finishing it before Author Existence Failure; he planned 24 'books', and finished only 6 of them.
  • Timothy Zahn's Vision of the Future clocks in at 720 pages in one paperback version, though other versions and the hardcover aren't quite as pagy. Shorter than most of these, but that's the longest novel of the Star Wars Expanded Universe to date. The German version was split into two separate books.
  • The Trouble's Tales series is probably the closest thing the Furry Fandom has to an original literary epic, with the individual chapters alone being at long has most novels, and with good reason! One of the advertising taglines for it accurately states that the series has everything, and by "everything" we do mean everything. (Mostly every kind of sex ever conceived by mankind, and several conceived by wombats, but also a fair dose of action and sci-fi.) Luckily, every single story is available to read for free online, and can only be bought in physical form via an online retailer who makes them one at a time — because, well, it's huge!
  • The collected Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen Donaldson could stop bullets.
  • Possibly the ultimate single-volume Doorstopper: Someone has published Agatha Christie's The Complete Miss Marple in one volume of 4,032 pages massing 8kg! To visualize that, the book is over a foot thick.
  • Samuel Delany's Dhalgren runs to about 800 pages.
  • Initially published as three separate books, the most readily available incarnation of Guy Gavriel Kay's The Fionavar Tapestry is a single-volume printing of 792 pages. He wrote a legitimate Doorstopper later on with Tigana (688 pages).
  • Ferdowsi's The Shahnameh. The abridged English prose translation by Dick Davis still manages to run close to 1,000 pages and according to the introduction the current full English verse translation is nine volumes long. Even if they're slim volumes with reasonable font sizes, that's still pretty impressive
  • The complete printed text of Varney the Vampire, compiling a 220-chapter "penny dreadful" serial from the early 1800s, runs on (and on and on) for some 868 double-column pages. A recent, three-volume paperback release of it consists of a total of 1440 very large pages.
  • The Good Soldier Švejk by Jaroslav Hašek is over 700 pages long, and it's not even finished, due to Hašek's death.
  • Robert R. McCammon:
    • Swan Song. The paperback edition is 956 pages.
    • The Queen of Bedlam is 656 pages in paperback.
    • Speaks the Nightbird is 816 pages and was originally released in two volumes.
  • The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick is 533 pages. An homage to silent movies, the novel seamlessly alternates between prose and illustrations to the point where if you skip the pictures you will not know what is going on. As a result it is the longest book to win the Caldecott Medal (best illustrations), an award that normally goes to picture books.
  • Mark Z. Danielewski:
    • House of Leaves is over 700 pages in paperback, all of them containing copious amounts of Mind Screw. But some of those pages have one word on them, due to the Unconventional Formatting, so it's more a Doorstopper in execution than in theory.
    • And then he published The Familiar, which is 880 pages and weights a hefty 3.6 pounds (it is printed on much thicker paper than House of Leaves was). It's taken Up to Eleven, or even Up To Twenty-Seven, considering that that was only the first book of a series of twenty-seven. Like this series? Reserve at least three shelves of your bookcase, and expect to only lift three of the twenty-seven at a time!note 
  • Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts clocks in at 944 pages.
  • Duncton Wood chronicles the entire life story of a pair of moles, from their birth to their death, so it's no wonder it's around 800 pages.
  • Perry Rhodan has to be the ultimate example. An on-going German science-fiction EPIC that calls itself the biggest science-fiction series for a reason. Since 1961 there's been over 2700 (in 2013) weekly novella-sized, pulp booklets released. These issues have been collected in books of about 400 pages long each. There's been over 100 of these books released and that still only covers about a third of the whole series. And those books are shortened quite a bit.
  • Mary Gentle's Ash: A Secret History is one volume of over 1100 pages, although it was split into four for its US paperback printing.
  • Inkheart, Inkspell, and Inkdeath are 534, 635, and 683 pages respectively. Dragon Rider, which was written by the same author, is 536 pages. Individually, none of these books could actually stop a door, but two or three piled on top of each other probably could.
  • The Stone Dance of the Chameleon: three books, the shortest of which is just over 700 pages.
  • The Bonfire of the Vanities at just over 700 pages usually, and another example here that was originally published serially (though it was revised for its release as a novel).
  • Ripped from a Dream: A Nightmare on Elm Street Omnibus collects the first three of Black Flame's Nightmare on Elm Street novels (Suffer the Children, Dreamspawn and Protegé). Each individual book is a little over 400 pages long, so that's a lot of Freddy (or not, in the case of Dreamspawn).
  • John Ringo's novels tend to be somewhat long but not long enough to qualify, in general; however, the last two books of the original set for the Legacy of the Aldenata series, Hell's Faire and When the Devil Dances, were originally to be one novel. The events of 9/11 threw off Ringo's muse, according to him in the afterword for HF, and the work was broken up to get a book to the printers before it got ridiculously late (instead of the actual somewhat late).
  • Gertrude Stein's The Making of Americans clocks in at a solid 925 pages, and also has the benefit of being written in abstract prose that's completely incomprehensible.
  • William Shirer's The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich is about 1143 pages long, with the index and footnotes adding 102 more pages. This tends to be par for the course in histories of Nazi Germany: see also William Burleigh's The Third Reich: A History (992 pages), Richard Evans' The Third Reich trilogy (a collective 2,576 pages in three volumes) and Joachim Fest's various works for other examples.
  • The Pacific Theater equivalent of Shirer is John Toland's The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945, which weighs in at 954 pages in its first edition.
  • Then there's Vincent Bugliosi's Reclaiming History, an exhaustive debunking of every conceivable JFK Assassination conspiracy theory that runs to a staggering 1,648 pages, plus an additional 1,000 pages worth of endnotes on an attached disc.
  • Michelle West's epic fantasy series The Sun Sword. The shortest book in it is 687 pages, the other five range from 737-957 pages. To top it off, the longest book in the series (The Sun Sword, the sixth and final book) also has smaller font than the other five books (which didn't exactly have large font before. I'd guess it to be 8-point font.). They're only available as mass-market paperbacks so one wouldn't be much of a weapon. All six together though? Be afraid, be very afraid.
  • Richard Bausch's Hello to the Cannibals is 840 pages long.
  • Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.
  • American Gods by Neil Gaiman is 629 pages.
  • Both of the The Kingkiller Chronicle books thus far have been extremely long. The hardcover version of The Wise Man's Fear is 994 pages long.
    • Yup.
    • The author, Pat Rothfuss, mentioned in one of his blogs while revising the second book before publication he'd added 60 000 words to The Wise Man's Fear. That's as long as one regular-length novel.
  • Altogether, the Hyperion Cantos clocks in at over 1700 pages. It weighs 2.3 kilograms in paperback.
    • The Endymion Omnibus by Dan Simmons, which contains Endymion and its sequel The Rise of Endymion, is a few pages shy of the 1000-page mark, and definitely of doorstopper thickness.
  • Every book in Wars of Light and Shadow qualifies, but special honor has to go to the second book, Ships of Merior. That one had to be divided into two volumes when released in paperback format, entitled Ships of Merior and Warhosts of Vastmark.
  • While most of the books in The Riftwar Cycle do not qualify, the first book, Magician, had to be divided into two books, Magician: Apprentice, and Magician: Master in paperback format due to it's length. And that was after the editor told the author to shorten the story by 50,000 words. The Author's Preferred Edition, which has the 50,000 words of various minor scenes put back in, definitely qualifies.
  • The Khaavren Romances are one big homage to Alexandre Dumas, so they are naturally very long. The Viscount of Adrilankha in particular is technically a trilogy, but the chapter numbering continues between them, so that by the end you have a 3-volume, 102-chapter epic where each third of it is at least 500 or 600 pages.
  • While not as hefty as some other entries on the list, The Dream Merchant still manages to clock in a respectable 640 pages.
  • Tyra Banks' novel Modelland is 576 pages.
  • John Lanchester's huge state-of-the-nation novel, Capital.
  • Aidan Chambers' novel This Is All: The Pillow Book of Cordelia Kenn tops out at 808 pages, a colossus of a young adult novel.
  • Judy Jones and William Wilson's An Incomplete Education contains 638 pages worth of everything you need to know to fake being "well-rounded."
  • 101 Years' Entertainment (edited by Ellery Queen) contains 995 pages of detective stories of varying quality.
  • Many of Clive Cussler's novels are this. From Treasure onward, they're routinely over 500 pages long.
  • The novels in Julian May's Saga of the Exiles and Galactic Milieu (four in the former and three in the latter) are all rather long (over 400 pages each); the two books set between them, Surveillance and Metaconcert are also lengthy... and in the UK they were combined into one shockingly long volume...
  • Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor isn't quite as long a historical romance as Gone With the Wind, but still runs to over 900 pages.
  • The first two books in the Ender series by Orson Scott Card, Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead, are under 400 pages, but third and fourth books, Xenocide and Children of the Mind, were originally one massive novel that would have been about 962 pages in paperback. Even with this division, the third book was still the longest in the main series at nearly 600 pages.
  • Jacek Dukaj's Ice has over one thousand pages. And through most of the book the main character doesn't believe he exists. Yay.
  • Leon Uris was fond of this.
  • Set aside some time if you're going to read Kushiel's Legacy- each book of the first trilogy is over 700 pages.
  • The individual Oz stories written by L. Frank Baum don't qualify (they're each only about 150 pages long), but The Treasury of Oz, which is an Omnibus edition of all 14 Oz novels by Baum, is about 25cm high, 18cm wide, and 4cm think. That's a book that's nearly standard A4 paper-sized and with 784 pages. And probably weighs more than most household appliances.
  • Ian Irvine's The Three Worlds Cycle. The first book alone, A Shadow On The Glass, is over 600 pages long, and the rest of the series doesn't let up either in terms of size. As of this post being written, the series stands at ELEVEN books of roughly equal length, with at least three more planned. This troper considers himself a pretty fast and avid reader, and even then it takes him at least three months to get through the whole thing (and that's without regular life getting in the way too...).
  • Maradonia and the Seven Bridges is over 800 pages, and Gloria Tesch likes to brag about it, calling herself the world's youngest novelist. Too bad it'd be a lot shorter if it weren't for the huge typeface, the terrible formatting, and the padding.
  • Googol by H.D.Klein, 1056 pages (in German). Now I wonder whether the title is a lampshade...Oh, and it has a follow-up, Googolplex (but with meagre 592 pages).
  • A lot of epics - by definition - are doorstoppers. (But not all of them.) i.e. Spenser's The Faerie Queene or Milton's Paradise Lost. The one that takes the cake - and is THE longest piece of literature in the world - has never been definitively compiled. This is because the work, The Epic of King Gesar, is some 20 million words long and would take an estimate of 120 volumes to complete.
  • The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell (not to be confused with the Sandman collection above) clocks in at 992 pages in its English translation.
  • Tamora Pierce has started writing these after Harry Potter made publishers realize that long YA books can sell. The Daughter of the Lioness seriesnote  are about as long as the quartets despite being two books. The Provost's Dog books are longer yet, with Mastiff clocking in at 500+ pages. Her Circle Reforged books are pretty long, too.
  • Middlemarch goes up to book VIII, and each and every section is 100+ pages long.
  • Shelby Foote's The Civil War: A Narrative has three volumes, each running to about 1,000 pages. Foote's work is so long and densely detailed (but also well-written and enjoyable) that individual chapters have been published as standalone works, eg. The Stars in Their Courses about Gettysburg.
  • A more recent historian, Rick Perlstein, has written several tomes chronicling the rise of political conservatism in America (Before the Storm, Nixonland). His most recent work, The Invisible Bridge, runs to 860-odd pages, with Perlstein publishing his end notes online. And Perlstein's confirmed there's at least one more book to come.
  • A full edition of Jean de La Fontaine's fables, with large illustrations by Gustave Dore, can become a hefty 900-page hardback.
  • Game Design Companion: A critical analysis of Wario Land 4 is a 600 page eBook that pretty much does Exactly What It Says on the Tin.
  • Harry Turtledove has several series that qualify. Not a few of the books in those series qualify on their own, for that matter.
  • The Fatal Dream by Ian Hastings is 806 pages long.
  • The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt is 864 pages long.
  • Graphic novel Lighter Than my Shadow by Katie Green is over 500 pages long, as well as having A4 pages.
  • The Robber Bride and The Blind Assassin by Margrat Atwood, 637 pages and 528 pages resepctively.
  • The Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness are all doorstoppers.
  • The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber.
  • Many many occult books and grimoires could be considered this. The two most well known examples are probably Aleister Crowley's magnum opus, 'Magick: Liber ABA, Book 4' which is a whopping 844 pages, and is affectionately referred to by many a Crowley-student as the 'Big Blue Brick'. The other is Israel Regardie's 'The Golden Dawn: The Original Account of the Teachings, Rites, and Ceremonies of the Hermetic Order' its most recent edition standing at 960 pages. Both are chock full of details on meditation, yoga, ceremonies and rituals, methods of creating, consecrating and using ritual tools and circles, outlines of rituals, spells, designs for talismans, and everything else needed to ensure that these two books go on to become two of the largest influences on modern cermeonial magic.
    • Other lesser-known or more modern examples also include the 'Book of Oberon', a recent translation and transcription of a 16th century manuscript that was held in the Folger Shakespeare Library, at 600 pages of spells, prayers, descriptions of spirits and demons and suchlike. Another example is the recent 'Foundations of Practical Sorcery: Collected Works', though this may not count since, while its collected edition is a hefty 848 pages long, it is technically made up of seven volumes that are available separately, each one based on a different branch of ceremonial magic (ritual tools, geomancy, scrying, Kabbalah, talismans, spirits of the cardinal directions and spirits of the Goetia).
  • There's no book in The Mortal Instruments series that is less than 400 pages. Shout out to City of Heavenly Fire for being a nice 725 pages.
  • Dr. William Samuel Sadler wrote some forty or fifty books which include Modern Psychiatry (896 pages) and Theory and Practice of Psychiatry (1231 pages).
  • James Tyler Kent's Lectures on Homeopathic Medicine has 982 pages of debatable worth.
  • A complete edition of Michel de Montaigne's Essays, containing essays long and short on nearly every subject, is a brick of over 1300 pages. Of special note is the essay "Apology for Raimond Sebond", which at over 70,000 words is the length of a novel.
  • George Ivanovitch Gurdjieff's All and Everything spends 1266 pages attempting to live up to its title.
  • Historian Ian Kershaw's two biographies of Adolf Hitler, Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris and Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis are both pretty large but neither quite qualifies as a doorstopper on its own. When published as a single combined volume, however, as they were in 2008, the book is just short of 1000 pages long, and that's excluding the new introduction and the index.
  • The Joy of Cooking is a famous American cookbook. The 75th anniversary edition is over 1000 pages long. The cookbook however doesn't only teach you how to cook recipes. It also gives advice on different ingredients, how to use cooking utensils, how to store foods, and other things beginner cooks would need to learn.
  • The appropriately titled Warriors Super Editions. The shortest Super Edition is 425 pages, and the rest are around 500. There are currently NINE of these, and a tenth is coming out in September.
  • Jerusalem by Alan Moore is over one million words long, so long in fact that the publisher actually split the book into three separate novels and sold them as a bundle so as not to intimidate a would-be reader.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Doorstopper/Literature