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Creator: Tom Clancy

"Who the hell cleared that?"
US Navy Admiral's reaction to reading The Hunt for Red October

Formerly an insurance broker, Tom Clancy (April 12, 1947 — October 1, 2013) was an American novelist specializing in techno-thrillers. His first and most famous novel is The Hunt for Red October.

Famous enough to be a brand name; the appellation "Tom Clancy's..." has been applied to a TV miniseries, several series of novels, and a number of Video Games; all meet the author's demands for research and technical realism, but most were made without much involvement from the man himself, and will definitely have no involvement now that Ubisoft has acquired the intellectual property rights to Tom Clancy's name.

Tom Clancy himself passed away on October 1st, 2013. The cause was never officially stated, but his long-time co-author John D. Gresham speculated that he'd been on borrowed time since a heart operation a few years earlier.


The Tom Clancy franchise includes the following major series and works:

Novels
  • Red Storm Rising — A hypothetical World War III scenario fought in the conventional theater. Due to an energy crisis, the USSR attacks NATO in a bid for oil. Cowritten with Larry Bond, who is mentioned in the foreword but not on the cover.
  • The Jack Ryan series - Written by him.
  • The Net Force series - Licensed use of his name.
  • The Op Center series - Licensed use of his name.
  • SSN, based on a submarine simulator Video Game of the same name. Written by him.

Video Games

Clancy novels with their own trope pages include:

Other Clancy novels have featured the following tropes:

  • America Saves the Day: A fairly standard plot, especially in later novels.
  • Armies Are Evil: Inverted. If a character has served or is serving, they are almost certainly a good person. The very few exceptions tend to be Soldiers at the Rear anyway. Even characters who appear for a little less than a paragraph get a little military biography. Sometimes this is semi-justified, as it is pretty plausible for airline pilots to be retired Air Force, but sometimes taken to ridiculous levels.
  • Author Filibuster: The discussion of the US Tax Code in Executive Orders. Almost any reference to abortion will elicit one of these from one of the characters.
  • Author Tract: Executive Orders basically features Jack Ryan cleaning up politics by putting Clancy's personal views into action.
  • Badass Army: America (and to lesser extents other good guys) are portrayed as commanding one, though America seems to get the lion's share.
  • Blasting It out of Their Hands: Played straight, lampshaded, subverted, discussed, and averted in several places.
  • Cash Cow Franchise: The reason for the existence of Net Force and Op Center, not to mention all the Clancy spinoff games. Heck, the entire Clancy franchise became this long ago - he sold the rights to his name and, until recently, had ghostwriters.
  • Cold Sniper: Played straight, inverted, and deconstructed in different novels.
  • Colon Cancer: Many of the games.
  • Commie Land: The setting for significant portions of the books, first the USSR and later the People's Republic of China after the Soviet Union fell apart.
  • Continuity Nod: All over the novels and some of the games.
  • Contrived Coincidence: See the entry on that page. In general, lots of what gets the plot moving depends on either someone having a change of heart at the right moment, or someone making a discovery that went ignored by everyone else just in the nick of time. To be fair, much of this is justified since it's uncovered by analysts who are doing what they're paid for.
    • Clancy's versions are extreme even by most versions of this trope. A car crash happens in Tennessee? Japan declares war on the US. A priest dies in China trying to prevent an abortion? China declares war on Russia. Each carefully laid out step by step.
    • One of Clancy's effective themes in his major works is the For Want of a Nail: one seemingly obscure thing or minor crime explodes way out of proportion all because the event is connected to important people through unlikely coincidences. Or because the right person was not in the room to make the right call...
    • One complaint about his novels was how most of the advanced tech gear he slavishly describes always worked: rarely did a gun jam or a helicopter crash due to accident.
  • Cool Boat: You might think every US naval vessel was this, given the amount of loving description Clancy visits on them. Clancy is almost never pictured without a baseball cap of a US Navy ship or unit, making those his Iconic Item.
  • Crazy-Prepared: The U.S. military, which makes plans for literally every conceivable military scenario. Probably Truth in Television.
  • Dirty Communists: Played more or less straight until The Cardinal of the Kremlin for the Soviets/Russians, but completely turned on its head afterwards, not only because of the fall of the Soviet Union. The trope is still applied to China, however.
  • Discussed Trope: Clancy loves to discuss the tropes related to Reality Is Unrealistic, largely via characters commenting on how people expect various aspects of police and spycraft to work because they saw it in a movie.
  • Doorstopper: Most of his novels.
  • Everybody Smokes: Not all the time, but the number of prominent characters who don't reach for a cig when the tension levels rise are few and far between.
  • Every Bullet is a Tracer: Averted, unsurprisingly. When tracers are used (particularly in the miniguns on the Pave Low helicopters in Clear and Present Danger), it's specifically mentioned that only one out of X bullets is a tracer round, for the purposes of assisting with aim. Given minigun rates of fire, it's also mentioned that it looks like a laser beam at full "rock and roll".
  • Follow the Leader: Clancy's work popularized the techno-thriller genre.
  • Godwin's Law: When the story is trying to rapidly establish the villainy of a particular country or ideology, expect a certain German dictator to crop up. A lot.
  • The Great Politics Mess-Up: The Hunt for Red October takes place in the year it was written, 1984. But by the time the film was being made in 1990, the Cold War was in the last stretch and Russia was no longer considered an enemy of the US. This required the filmmakers to set it back in 1984, contrasting with the trend of later adaptations to just update the year and socio-political backdrop.
  • Guy in Back: Featured in several novels, with one of the more prominent examples being CDR Jackson's back-seater in The Hunt for Red October becoming severely injured when Jackson's F-14 was attacked. The back-seater later gets mentioned briefly as taking command of his own carrier wing.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: All over the place. Most notably:
    • In Debt of Honor, a Japanese airline pilot crashes his plane into the Capitol Building. Five years later, four airliners are crashed into buildings by terrorists, with the fourth airliner having been forced down by a passenger revolt on its way towards Washington, D.C.
    • In Executive Orders, a biological attack nearly shuts down the entire United States. Shortly following the September 11, 2001 attacks, powdered anthrax is sent through the postal system, impairing government operations.
    • Although claims by the People's Republic of China to many islands in the South China Sea have been ongoing for years, only since about 2013 has there been actively enforcing those claims, as in Threat Vector
    • Command Authority has the Russian Federation trying and nearly succeeds in invading and annexing Ukraine, getting to keep only the Crimea after President Ryan's intervention. Not half a year later, Russia invades Ukraine, using imported "protesters" as part of the plan, ultimately taking the Crimea.
  • Hot Sub-on-Sub Action: More subs attack each other in Clancy's novels than in the entire history of naval warfare. On the other hand, most of these novels are premised on the Cold War heating up a bit, so it's entirely justified: after the '60s, that kind of sub-to-sub combat was not only possible but likely given that NATO and Warsaw Pact subs were constantly on one another's tails.
  • In Name Only: The works whose titles include "Tom Clancy's" only bears his name on the cover, other creators working off of basic setting outlines written by Clancy. In general, many of the "Tom Clancy's" novels are somewhat less well received than the works directly from his hand (or word processor), particularly in regards to the "Op-Center" book series.
  • Interservice Rivalry: All over the place. CIA vs. FBI, FBI vs. Secret Service, KGB vs. GRU, etc.
  • Moscow Centre: A majority of Clancy's fictional works involve the KGB or its successors. Up to The Sum of All Fears, people of Moscow Centre were always cast as the antagonists, though infrequently as outright villains.
  • Only a Flesh Wound: Averted. Gunshot wounds incapacitate and kill or nearly kill several protagonists.
  • Pink Mist: Clancy, for all your realistically gory headshot descriptions.
  • Red Scare: Communists, first in the USSR and later in the People's Republic of China, are frequent adversaries in the novels.
  • Reporting Names: Being a technothriller, the Soviet (and later Russian) military gear is almost always referred to by their reporting names, not the formal designations.
    • Even Soviet/Russian characters utilize these sometimes, which makes no sense no matter how one looks at it.
  • Science Marches On: Several books set Twenty Minutes into the Future make use of proposed weapons systems that never went into production, or never existed in the first place.
  • Shoot Out the Lock: Defied — in several novels it's pointed out that this does not work in real life. In most cases, the shooter has to use several more bullets and messily destroy the lock mechanism to open the door.
  • Shown Their Work: He actually had Navy personnel visit him demanding answers about what was in The Hunt for Red October, as some detail about submarine operation that he included in Red October, that he had pieced together himself, turned out to be not only correct but classified. Clancy explained the details were readily available in many library books on submarines. Not bad considering that Clancy was an insurance salesman with no prior military experience before becoming an author.
  • Shrine to Self: Several military characters are shown to have this attitude.
  • Sociopathic Soldier: Soviet KGB troops tend to get this treatment, as distinct from the Red Army's soldiers. Even the Red Army soldiers show their disdain for their green-shoulder-board-wearing comrades.
  • Strawman Political: Clancy makes rather blatant use of strawman liberals, pacifists, and environmentalists throughout his novels. It's a given that such people will be morally weak as well.
  • Take That: Clancy takes the opportunity in several of his novels to note that none of the things that happen in Ian Fleming's James Bond novels would ever pass muster in reality.
  • Tear Your Face Off: Clancy is rather fond of this. Multiple books feature somewhat graphic descriptions of a well-placed headshot plastering someone's face against a wall.
  • Technobabble: Clancy's lengthy, loving descriptions of exactly how military technology works can occupy whole chapters.
  • Technology Porn: Lots, especially military technology.
  • Title Drop: Done in virtually all of his novels, with very few exceptions.
  • Unreliable Narrator: Clancy writes a lot of enemy plotting from their POV (as the protagonists rarely meet the antagonists directly). As said enemy plotters are frequently ideological and/or mentally unbalanced, their assessment of an operation can differ radically from what it will or could actually achieve.
  • Why We Are Bummed Communism Fell: Clancy has had mixed success in finding new Big Bads after the collapse of the Soviet Union.
  • Yellow Peril: Tom Clancy loves this. Apart from multiple Ryanvese examples, SSN has China goes to war with America over the Spratly Islands. Based on a submarine simulator Video Game.

The Great Politics Mess-UpPossible WarBattlefield 3
Evil Twin: Cyprien's ChroniclesCreator/Ubi SoftGhost Recon
Queen And CountrySpy FictionThe Quest for Karla
TimeSplittersNintendo Game CubeGhost Recon
C. J. CherryhAuthorsCassandra Clare

alternative title(s): Tom Clancy
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