YMMV: The Dreamstone

  • Awesome Art: Most of the landscapes are Scenery Porn. Some of the character animation is exceptionally classy and fluid for a nineties TV cartoon as well, particularly in some of the earlier Moving Images International episodes.
  • Awesome Music: Mike Batt provides a brilliant orchestral soundtrack for the series, most notably the vocal themes, "Better than a Dream" and "War Song Of The Urpneys".
  • Badass Decay: Within the duration between the first and second season premieres, Rufus devolved from a Cloud Cuckoo Lander Badass Adorable with a sword to a generic Useless Meddling Kid. Amberley ended up pretty much the same, most episodes ending with them getting bailed out or outshone by the Dream Maker or the Wuts.
  • Base Breaker: Rufus and Amberley are either cute, relatable Kid Heroes or boring Designated Heroes compared to the Urpneys.
    • Spildit even more so, either hated for being an obnoxious Cousin Oliver or loved for being an adorable Friendly Enemy to Blob and his troops.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: "The Voice of Zordrak" features a small scene in which one of Rufus' daydreams comes to life and he magically takes the form of a Dream Maker. Only Albert witnesses this before it wears off. This occurrence, and whatever caused it, are never referred to again throughout the series.
  • Bizarro Episode: Any episode that revolved around the dreams themselves usually qualified as such. "The Daydream Bubble", "The Moon Of Doom" and "Hod" are particularly trippy examples.
  • Cult Classic: Remembered by next to no one, but those who do are dedicated fans.
  • Crazy Awesome: Urpgor at times, usually the more deranged his inventions are, the nearer they get to succeeding. On the hero side, Wildit, and on rarer occasions, Rufus, have moments of this.
  • Designated Villain/Monkey: Most of the Urpneys, but especially Frizz and Nug. The heroes consider them the highest form of scum, however in early episodes they were essentially established as slaves of Zordrak who got their numbers thinned out the longer he had to wait to get the stone. Their meek and blatantly unwilling disposition makes them near impossible to side against.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Urpgor, with the rest of the Urpney cast not far off.
  • Glurge: The show concerns a Serious Business war about sending dreams mixed badly with aforementioned Designated Hero/Villain issues and a tall order of saccharine throughout. The later episodes took steps to ease out of it.
  • Good Is Boring/Evil Is Cool: The show often opted for giving the Urpneys the bigger spotlight, with the heroes having less developed personalities and rarely engaging in the Slapstick and verbal humour. The final season tried to make Rufus and Amberley more comedic, but the Urpneys still usually stole the show.
  • Growing the Beard: The first two seasons were fun, but mostly limited to the Urpney comedy. Season Three and Four are less formulaic than the first two, with more focus on world building and development of the show's mythos and many plot and characterization issues such as the Protagonist-Centered Morality and the Noops' Flanderization rectified somewhat.
  • Idiot Plot: A few episodes seemed to struggle to stretch the Urpneys' incredibly handy defeats into 22 minutes, most commonly the elder heroes Forgot About Their Powers until the last second, sending the powerless Noops to do everything first. The dynamic as a whole also often required the heroes to be much more hostile and petty than the villains themselves, at least early on (see Designated Villain/Designated Hero above).
  • Jerkass Woobie: Urpgor is a psychotic weasel who constantly relishes in any torture Blob and his minions recieve; however, his right hand role with Zordrak only leads to him suffering even more abuse and pressure from their boss, and, despite his beliefs, is considered no less despensible than the other Urpneys because of it. Naturally whenever he tries getting the stone instead of Blob, things usually go just as well too.
    • Sgt. Blob himself is a pompous Drill Sergeant Nasty who ceaselessly kicks around his men. From the very start however we see the pressure put on him if he and his men don't follow things through, and he almost always suffers the same level penalties as Frizz and Nug.
  • Love to Hate: Most of the Urpneys are sympathetic Mooks bordering on Designated Villain territory (see above). Urpgor however is a back stabbing psychopath, on top of being an Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain and a walking Disney Acid Sequence, and you'll be hard pressed to find a fan who doesn't adore him as a result.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Urpgor is easily the most popular character in fandom.
  • Narm: The show plays the plight of sending good and bad dreams with surprisingly earnest tension at times, especially considering the Urpneys are usually what pivot it. The Dream Maker and Zordrak are obviously most prone to this. The later episodes at least add in genuine life and death stakes to justify it.
  • Nightmare Fuel:
    • Zordrak, particularly in the opening of every episode. To name exceptional moments:
      • His very first scene in the pilot, executing Captain Crigg.
      • His origin story in "The Daydream Bubble".
      • Also, the Zordrak-possessed Amberley in "The Knitted Balloon".
  • Nightmare Retardant:
  • Periphery Demographic: The show is fairly cutesy and childish in tone (cartoon hosting site Jaroo even lists it as a Pre School show) however it has gained more than a few older fans, largely for it's witty Urpney humour.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: The closing points of the series seemed to try and fix a lot of problems with the hero cast, giving them a legitimate provocation and downplaying their occasionally Narmy or disproportionate treatment of the Urpneys. Rufus and Amberley, in addition to reversing their Badass Decay, also gained more comedic and proactive personalities and took part in the story and slapstick more often. While it wasn't quite enough to stop fans Rooting for the Empire, they at least looked likeable against the Urpneys in this era.
  • Rewatch Bonus: Rufus' dream sequence in the pilot episode actually alludes to some events in later episodes (the three shooting stars that the jettisoned Urpneys create in "The Daydream Bubble" along with the eventual reveal of Planet Dreamstone throughout the former and "The Dark Side").
  • Rooting for the Empire: Come on. Say you didn't want the Urpneys to win at least once.
  • The Scrappy: Wildit and Spildit tend to get flak for occasional Spotlight Stealing and being the product of Executive Meddling.
  • Ship Tease: The series gave subtle teases with Rufus and Amberley. Most blatant in "The Knitted Balloon" and "The Neemod".
  • Straw Utopia: The Land Of Dreams is incredibly peaceful and void of conflict and woe outside when the villains attack. Viltheed tries to act as a Straw Dystopia, but the Urpneys' sympathetic disposition counters it.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel: Expectedly, any dream shown onscreen is usually this, especially that of the pilot and closing credits.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: The antics in the Land of Dreams get pretty sickly sweet at times.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: The show has a pretty creative premise, though development of it's expansive universe, cast and mythos are often overlooked in favor of the Urpneys' slapstick taking up most of the spotlight, especially in it's earlier seasons. If it weren't for its name, The Dreamstone could often be seen as any other standard MacGuffin stealing show (not to say it's a bad one however).
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: The show does seem to place a lot of pity onto the Urpneys, but likely still intends them to be villains who deserve their punishment. But being Press-Ganged into a Serious Business war (which both allies and foes are willing to kill them over) makes them look more like scapegoated middle men.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: The heroes resultantly look Wangsty and petty, especially in cases their retribution gets particularly excessive. That they could rarely back it up whenever the villains really were dangerous didn't help. Later episodes at least fixed their characterisations, though they still had Frizz and Nug as their main provocateurs.
  • Unpopular Popular Character: All four of the main Urpneys.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: The Noops, Rufus and Amberley, end up looking fairly unremarkable compared to the villains and even most of their more powerful and surreal comrades. They take the part well as newcomers encountering the show's different worlds and processes, but the focus otherwise usually sways in the Urpneys' favor due to their more colorful personalities and providing most the show's slapstick.
  • Wangst: The Noops really don't like getting bad dreams. The Dream Maker apparently has terrified mobs at his door the moment they get so much as one.
    • Frizz is this trope Played for Laughs. Even the other Urpneys think he should suck it up.
  • The Woobie: Frizz and Nug are meek abused incompetents who don't even want to be villains. Sgt Blob leans somewhere between this and a Jerkass Woobie.
  • Woobie Species: The Urpneys. Dumb, cowardly, completely luckless, hated and abused by the entire universe (mostly for what Zordrak makes them do) and slowly having their numbers thinned out either by their Bad Boss or their failed schemes. They're usually also the only lot who want nothing to do with the war with dreams (largely because they suffer all the collateral damage of it). The closing points dialled down their treatment, albeit slightly (as in just enough that the heroes didn't look like Jerkasses for beating them).