Trivia: Puyo Puyo

  • Cash Cow Franchise: In fact, Puyo Puyo was basically Compile's only major series after they stopped releasing scrolling shooters. Unfortunately for them, they were forced to give most of it to Sega in 1998 (leading to Sega's name showing up in N64 and PSX games) and didn't last long after Sega cut them off entirely.
    • Sega seemed content to release low-budget, moderate-return games every few years. Then along came Puyo Puyo!! Quest, which was a huge success and is currently one of the two flagship titles for Sega's mobile division. (The other being Chain Chronicle.)
  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Carbuncle (except in the Saturn port of Tsu), Lagnus, Dongurigaeru, Klug, Ocean Prince, Sig, Rei, Onion Pixy, and CD Tsu's Nohoho.
  • Fan Nickname: "Pedobear" for Risukuma.
  • Fan Translation: A few of the Madou Monogatari games, the Famicom Puyo Puyo, Super Puyo Puyo Tsu, the PC version of Puyo Puyo SUN and the DS versions of Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary and Puyo Puyo 7. A partial translation of Fever 2 was released after years of Development Hell made it apparent that it would never be completely finished; likewise, the planned translation of 20th Anniversary, already set back by a server crash that claimed several files, is in Vapor Ware territory.
    • Arle no Bouken is infamous for being something of a fan translation black hole. There are no less than five separate patches, and none of them even come close to translating the entire game. The last try was in early 2013 and was put on indefinite hold due to the lack of a dedicated translator; the author of this partial patch speculated that the game's messy structure prematurely ended previous attempts.
  • Hey, It's That Voice!: Yikes.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: Sega only seems interested in releasing the Compile-era Puyo Puyo games that they themselves published. This especially hurts in the case of Tsu, where each version after the Mega Drive port adds new features.
    • Averted with Madou Monogatari 1-2-3 and ARS; D4 Enterprise appears to have no problems when it comes to re-releasing the MSX and PC-98 versions. The same can't be said for the console Madou Monogatari games though, especially since several of them were not published by Compile or Sega.
    • The English arcade game is probably the most extreme example. How bad is it? MAME had to rely on a ROM taken from a bootleg board for at least 4 years.
  • Milestone Celebration: Two of them; special games were made for their 15th and 20th anniversary.
  • Name's the Same:
  • No Export for You: Every game except the Dolled Up Installments, the Neo Geo Pocket Color port of Tsu, Puyo Pop on the GBA and Puyo Pop Fever. The English version of the first arcade game could potentially be another exception. The Mega Drive port of Tsu is available (untranslated) via the Wii's Virtual Console.
    • Inverted with the N-Gage Puyo Pop, which was released everywhere except Japan.
  • The Other Darrin: Happened quite often during Compile's run. The earliest entries had Compile staff and employees of the RCC Broadcasting company provide voices, NEC commissioned professional voice actors for the PC-Engine games, and a mostly different set of professionals were used in Yon. And that's before getting to the characters that changed actors between individual ports.
  • Port Overdosed: The first arcade game and Tsu, with Tsu being the biggest offender. For example, the two games' Mega Drive ports and original arcade versions are available on the Japanese Wii Virtual Console, despite the fact that their arcade hardware was essentially a Mega Drive with extra sound capabilities. At least the arcade ports were online-enabled.
    • Puyo Pop Fever is only a port or two shy of reaching this status.
  • Prop Recycling:
    • Unsurprisingly, the Dolled-Up Installments pull assets from the original Puyo Puyo. An especially-amusing example is Kirby's Avalanche's title screen: if you look closely, you can see "PUYOPYO" [sic] written several times in the background.
    • Many of Puyo Puyo's sound effects, particularly the "serious" effects used in the first two games' respective Satan battles, were first used in M.U.S.H.A. The jingle that would eventually become associated with All-Clears is also present within the game.
    • The vocal clips were taken from Madou Monogatari 1-2-3. This is most likely why Rulue lacks a vocal catchphrase.
    • The English arcade game recycles voice clips in instances that the Japanese game did not. This may be related to space issues, as two voice clips (both of which are used in the Curtain Call) are cut entirely.
    • Puyo Puyo CD Tsu features the pre-battle cutscenes from the Saturn and Super Famicom ports as an unlockable...except that they all take place in the "meadow" featured in the first game.
  • Sequel First: Madou Monogatari 2 was actually the first game in either series to be released anywhere. A beta version was included in the Christmas '89 edition of Discstation.
    • Whatever game that you consider to be the first Puyo game to be released internationally (arcade translation, Mean Bean Machine, or NGPC Puyo Pop) definitely isn't the MSX or FDS game.
    • The Western world didn't receive a Madou Monogatari game until 2013.
  • Talking to Himself: While this is to be expected of the earlier games, even now there are a few examples. We have Arle and Klug and Yu and Rei (being twin siblings) to name some.
  • What Could Have Been: Puzlow Kids' existence implies that Sega was close to releasing Puyo Puyo in the west mostly intact (well, as intact as the English arcade game, anyway) before deciding to re-skin the game.
    • According to one of the Japanese guidebooks for Tsu, Compile was going to try to get Super Puyo Puyo released overseas before they were approached by Nintendo for Kirby's Avalanche.
    • The prototype of the arcade Puyo Puyo contains six Puyo colors. The sixth color (teal, instead of the MSX game's gray Puyo) was Dummied Out, but hackers have discovered that the game's code is still capable of handling it.