Trivia / Puyo Puyo

  • Bad Export for You: The iOS Sega Columns Deluxe is a port of the Japanese Puyo Puyo~n & Columns phone game, except with the characters removed.
  • Cash Cow Franchise: In fact, Puyo Puyo was basically Compile's only major series after they stopped releasing scrolling shooters. Unfortunately for them, they were forced to give most of it to Sega in 1998 (leading to Sega's name showing up in N64 and PSX games) and didn't last long after Sega cut them off entirely.
    • Sega initially seemed content to release low-budget, moderate-return games every few years. Then along came Puyo Puyo!! Quest, which was a huge success and is currently one of the flagship titles for Sega's mobile division.
  • Colbert Bump: Giant Bomb's Quick Look of Puyo Puyo Tetris played a large part in getting western gamers interested in the game, as well as the series in general.
  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Carbuncle (except in the Saturn port of Tsu), Lagnus, Dongurigaeru, Klug, Ocean Prince, Sig, Rei, Onion Pixy, and CD Tsu's Nohoho.
  • Cut Song: The Mega Drive version of the first game has Rejection of Puyo Puyo, which is not used anywhere in the game.
    • The Game Gear version cuts the Curtain Call but retains its theme.
    • The Mega Drive version of Tsu contains the melody that plays upon defeating Satan in the first game.
  • Dueling Games: Puyo Puyo~n and Magical Drop F. Both were the 4th mainline entries in their respective series, released in 1999, skipped arcades, featured an Art Shift, and experimented with Limit Breaks. Yon "won," but the series was out of Compile's hands by 2001 anyway.
  • Exiled from Continuity: Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God does away with the original Madou Monogatari characters for legal reasons. At least a few of the new characters are Expies of the old cast.
  • Fan Nickname: "Pedobear" for Risukuma.
  • Fan Translation: A few of the Madou Monogatari games, the Famicom Puyo Puyo, Super Puyo Puyo Tsu, the PC version of Puyo Puyo SUN and the DS versions of Puyo Puyo 15th Anniversary and Puyo Puyo 7. A partial translation of Fever 2 was released after years of Development Hell made it apparent that it would never be completely finished; likewise, the planned translation of 20th Anniversary went into Vapor Ware territory after a server crash claimed several critical files. The English arcade version of Puyo Puyo might be a fan translation as well; nobody's quite sure what the deal is with that thing.
    • Arle no Bouken is infamous for being something of a fan translation black hole. There are no less than five separate patches, and none of them even come close to translating the entire game. The last try was in early 2013 and was put on indefinite hold due to the lack of a dedicated translator; the author of this partial patch speculated that the game's messy structure prematurely ended previous attempts.
  • Follow the Leader:
    • Puyo Puyo was Compile's answer to Tetris and Dr. Mario. The first two arcade games' successes saw dozens of competition-focused puzzle games featuring wacky casts of characters hit the market. Hebereke's Popoon and Konami's Taisen Puzzle Dama are particularly blatant from a gameplay standpoint (the main differences being that they are Match Three instead of Match Four). As mentioned above, Magical Drop F takes a lot from Puyo Puyo~n despite Magical Drop having fundamentally-different gameplay.
    • Much of Compile's 1999-2000 output was them desperately trying to apply Arle and friends to popular gaming trends, from Pokémon to Dance Dance Revolution to Super Robot Wars. They were going to try to imitate Puyo itself with Pochi & Nyaa after they lost the series, but went out of business before the game released.
    • Puyo Puyo!! Quest is a thinly-veiled take on Puzzle & Dragons.
  • Invisible Advertising: If there was ever an English-language Puyo Puyo ad, the fandom sure hasn't found it.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: Sega only seems interested in releasing the Compile-era Puyo Puyo games that they themselves published. This especially hurts in the case of Tsu, where each version after the Mega Drive port adds new features.
    • This initially seemed to be the case with many Madou Monogatari games, but D4 has been slowly but surely re-releasing them. The only games whose ownership statuses are still questionable are Madou Monogatari: Hanamaru Dai Youchienji (published by Tokuma Shoten), Madou Monogatari: I Honoo No Sotsuenji (developed and published by NEC), and Arle no Bouken: Mahou no Jewel (technically not part of the series).
    • The English arcade game is so obscure and hard to find that MAME had to rely on a ROM taken from a bootleg board for at least 4 years...and because of this (combined with the lack of any official release information), some believe that the game itself is a bootleg.
    • Don't have an N-Gage or later Symbian OS phone? Tough luck trying to play the N-Gage Puyo Pop. Even worse than the English arcade game because, as of this writing, there is no N-Gage emulator for PC.note 
  • Milestone Celebration: Three of them; special games were made for their 15th, 20th and 25th anniversary.
  • Name's the Same:
  • No Export for You: Every game except the first arcade game, Dolled Up Installments, the Neo Geo Pocket Color port of Tsu (and the untranslated Mega Drive port on the Wii Virtual Console), Puyo Pop on the GBA and Puyo Pop Fever. And North America only got two versions of Fever out of the eight or so.
    • Puzlow Kids is a particularly painful example, as the cartridge was already bilingual.
    • Inverted with the N-Gage Puyo Pop, which was released everywhere except Japan.
  • The Other Darrin: Happened quite often during Compile's run. The earliest entries had Compile staff and employees of the RCC Broadcasting company provide voices, NEC commissioned professional voice actors for the PC-Engine games, and a mostly different set of professionals were used in Yon. And that's before getting to the characters that changed actors between individual ports.
  • Port Overdosed: The first arcade game and Tsu, with Tsu being the biggest offender. For example, the two games' Mega Drive ports and original arcade versions are available on the Japanese Wii Virtual Console, despite the fact that their arcade hardware was essentially a Mega Drive with extra sound capabilities. At least the arcade ports were online-enabled.
    • Puyo Pop Fever is only a port or two shy of reaching this status.
  • Prop Recycling:
    • Unsurprisingly, the Dolled-Up Installments pull assets from the original Puyo Puyo. An especially-amusing example is Kirby's Avalanche's title screen: if you look closely, you can see "PUYOPYO" [sic] written several times in the background.
    • Many of Puyo Puyo's sound effects, particularly the "serious" effects used in the first two games' respective Satan battles, were first used in M.U.S.H.A. The jingle that would eventually become associated with All-Clears is also present within the game.
    • The voice samples were taken from Madou Monogatari 1-2-3. This is the most likely reason why Ruluelacks a vocal catchphrase.
    • The English arcade game recycles voice clips in instances that the Japanese game did not. This is due to space issues.
    • Puyo Puyo CD Tsu features the pre-battle cutscenes from the Saturn and Super Famicom ports as an unlockable...except that they all take place in the "meadow" featured in the first game.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers: Sorcery Saga: Curse of the Great Curry God, as detailed in Exiled from Continuity above.
    • It's been heavily implied that Sega is the reason why Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory's Moe Anthropomorphism of Compile (who, naturally, is full of Puyo Puyo references) remains Japan-exclusive and doesn't show up for the remake. Seems like Puyo Puyo and Compile Heart do not mix.
    • Many blame Ubisoft for the fact that Puyo Puyo Tetris, a title that western gamers has shown an abnormal amount of interest in, remains Japan-exclusive. What elevates this theory beyond Wild Mass Guessing is the fact that nearly every digital, English-language version of Tetris went offline shortly before the release of Ubisoft's Tetris Ultimate, suggesting that the company has an exclusive license to North American and European Tetris.
  • Sequel First: Madou Monogatari 2 was actually the first game in either series to be released anywhere. A beta version was included in the Christmas '89 edition of Discstation.
    • Whatever game that you consider to be the first Puyo game to be released internationally (arcade translation, Mean Bean Machine, or NGPC Puyo Pop) definitely isn't the MSX or FDS game.
    • The Western world didn't receive a Madou Monogatari game until 2013.
  • Sequel Gap: The gap between Madou Monogatari for the Sega Saturn (1998) and Sorcery Saga (2013) is roughly 15 years. It's also worth noting that the last "mainline" Puyo game was Puyo Puyo 7 (2009), which is at 6 years and counting.
  • Talking to Himself: While this is to be expected of the earlier games, even now there are a few examples. We have Arle and Klug and Yu and Rei (being twin siblings) to name some.
  • Troubled Production: Waku Waku Puyo Puyo Dungeon was slated to release in late 1997, but ended up getting delayed to spring 1998. What makes this delay so significant is that it allegedly played a role in forcing Compile to restructure.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • The 8-bit Puyo Puyo was originally set to be a Disc Station release. According to Niitani, the decision to develop for the Famicom Disk System came because the peripheral was failing and thus Nintendo would be less concerned with the similarities between Puyo Puyo and Dr. Mario.
    • Puzlow Kids' existence implies that Sega had plans to release ports of the first arcade game in the west mostly intact. There's Wild Mass Guessing about why it didn't release outside of Japan (much of it involving the English arcade game), but no concrete answer.
    • According to one of the Japanese guidebooks for Tsu, Compile was going to try to get Super Puyo Puyo released overseas before they were approached by Nintendo for Kirby's Avalanche.
    • The prototype of the arcade Puyo Puyo contains six Puyo colors. The sixth color (teal, instead of the MSX game's gray Puyo) was Dummied Out, but hackers have discovered that the game's code is still capable of handling it.
    • The Mega Drive version of Tsu has assets of a Nazo Puyo Mode that was finished and implemented into a handful of later ports.
    • An early concept of Ringo originally depicted her as a Magical Girl. She was accompanied by blue and yellow-colored companions to make up a Magical Girl Trio, making up the original concept of Puyo 7's ARS. One can infer that this concept art may actually have been the basis of 7's Transformation mechanic.

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