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Vocal Evolution
aka: Vocal Decay
Space Ghost: Man, Zorak, what was with your voice back then?
Zorak: Yeah, well, what's up with your voice?
Space Ghost Coast to Coast (revisiting their first meeting)

Actors are only human, which includes voice actors. Voice actors don't have to worry about makeup or costumes, so it can be easy to assume that their job is much easier than that of actors visible on the screen. It may or may not be, but the unique challenge they face is breathing life into an animated character with their voice alone and no other props. And like with new artists, it can take novice voice actors some time to grow into their character and develop distinctive voices for them.

On the flip side, lending one's voice to a show over multiple months or years can cause a voice actor to get lazy and begin slacking off on the nuances of their character's voice, or even age to the point where they find it impossible to sustain the original voice and have to make compromises. This decline in quality can also manifest itself in shows with large casts when all characters' voices begin to sound the same or monotonous. This doesn't tend to lead to lost jobs, because a decline in timbre quality is often less noticeable than a decline in acting or art quality. With child voice actors, whether a fan will like it or not, this is going to happen when they hit puberty, although some shows switch into The Other Darrin at that point.

This trope can also apply to singing, or any other medium that requires a voice in some way (like cartoon voice acting).

In cases involving Talking to Himself, this can sometimes lead to characters sounding more or less like each other.

Contrast with The Other Darrin, in which the entire actor is replaced (or, in the case of voiceover work, the voice change is because an actor was replaced, not because the actor changed the voice).

Examples

    open/close all folders 

     Anime & Manga  
  • Pokémon's English dub has shades of this, where Ash's voice (actress) is pretty rough and uneven in the first couple episodes. She finds the right balance afterwards...only to become increasingly overly-high pitched during Orange Islands and Johto. However, toward the end of Veronica Taylor's tenure as Ash, her voice for him had become noticeably lower, perhaps to give the impression of aging (despite what the writers will tell you). Alternatively, it could have something to do with the fact that following the Johto arc, she was cast as the new female lead and had to distinguish Ash from May by lowering her voice again.
    • The voice director told Veronica Taylor to play Ash with a deep voice in the first few episodes because that's how he thought ten-year old boys sounded. Taylor brought in a sound clip of her ten-year old nephew to prove him wrong, and Ash's voice was allowed to go much higher.
    • All the voice actors for the current dub fall into this, as they were all brought in as sound-alikes to the 4Kids VA's. It understandably took the PUSA VA's a much longer time to really get comfortable with the characters and make them their own.
    • Curiously, in the Latin-American Spanish dub Ash's male voice actor (Gabriel Ramos, now a VJ for Latin American MTV) started dubbing him when he was around 12. Now that Gabriel's in his early to mid 20's, ever since Advanced Battle you can't help but noticing that Ash's voice was gotten rougher with time.
    • Eric Stuart's James voice gradually raised in pitch and took on a more goofy tone as the show went on.
      • Similar to what his Latin American counterpart, José Antonio "Pepe" Macías, did as well. He chose a more comedic, nasal and somewhat childish tone (mixed with a high dose of Mexican-Spanish slang words), though. It still worked very well.
  • Any work of Nozomu Sasaki. A good point of comparison is his work as Hathaway Noa in Char's Counterattack. In the original film his voice was like that of a child. By the time he reprised the role for a Gundam EVOLVE short, his voice was so much deeper that it was unrecognisable.
  • The english dub of Digimon Adventure had some voice changes after the earlier episodes, most notably with the kid's In-Training Digimon (Koromon in particular went from having a squeaky voice to sounding more like an eight-year-old boy), and Garurumon (Whose voice became more scratchy and high-pitched half-way through the series).
    • Sadly, we also get a couple cases of de-evolution: Armadillomon had a "geeky" voice as Submarimon, a different flavor of his usual cowboy voice for Digmon, and a grown-up-Armadillomon voice for Ankylomon (his true Champion form.) By season's end, all his Armor/Champion forms sound just alike. The same goes for Zoe, who sounds a bit less kiddy as Kazemon and very adult and confident as Zephyrmon. The distinctions fade and by the end they all sound like Zoe.
  • Revolutionary Girl Utena's dub is likewise pretty stilted in early episodes for any of the more mellow characters, though the speed of improvement is usually tied with how much dialogue is given to particular characters.
  • In at least one interview, Mark Gatha, the US voice actor for G Gundam' Domon Kasshu, has said that the cast didn't hit their stride until around Episode 20, and were denied the chance to re-record the early episodes by the studio.
  • A major case of an entire studio stepping up in quality is FUNimation. After releasing the professional voice actors from The Ocean Group after the first two seasons of Dragon Ball Z, they began with a rookie cast from Season 3 on. The big problem was the new cast trying to match the old voices, which resulted in varying quality (and a tremendous fan backlash). But over time, most came into their roles and made the characters their own. Christopher Sabat, for instance, gave a much lower and brooding voice for Vegeta compared to Brian Drummond's higher and scratchy voice. The company is now one of the most popular dubbing studios.
    • It's especially noticeable in the Season 3 DVD set of DBZ, where Sabat (Vegeta, Piccolo, et al) and Sonny Strait (Krillin) went back and redubbed many of their lines.
    • A minor example of this trope in the DBKai dub: Chris Ayres' voice for Frieza's first form was rather high-pitched in his first few episodes, but starting when Frieza goes back to his mothership, the pitch drops considerably lower.
    • There's also a big difference in quality between the first episodes of One Piece that were dubbed by Funimation for Cartoon Network, and the ones released years later on DVD. The voice characterizations are noticeably more subtle and the pitches less static, and the dramatic scenes are much more intense.
    • Same goes for Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood, which is a closer adaptation to the manga than the 2003 series. FUNi brought back most of the same VA's - all with noticeably better acting skills - and even the characters whose VA's they changed were better than the original. Take Scar, for instance, voiced by Dameon Clarke in the original and J. Michael Tatum in the remake. Clarke portrayed him with a less gruff, slightly higher voice, while Tatum went for rougher and more masculine, much more fitting of Scar than the former (though 2003 is justified in that he's younger.)
      • Even within the 2003 anime you can hear the voices change. Envy's voice gets more gravelly towards the end of the dub.
    • Sabat in particular warrants mentioning for both of the aforementioned shows. In particular, his Piccolo and Vegeta voices from original DBZ as well as his Armstrong voice from first-anime FMA would be relatively hard to tell apart as separate characters to anyone hearing them for the first time. His versatility and adaptability with deeper/harder-voiced characters has grown greatly over the years, and it shows when he gets another major chance with all three characters. Kai dub Piccolo sounds distinctly Older and Wiser, clearly marking the difference between him and his father; Vegeta sounds like a calculating Warrior Prince and/or a stark raving Blood Knight at the exact right moments; and Brotherhood dub Armstrong's boisterous yet earnest nobility is clearly presented, even back with an accent for emphasis.
  • If you watch the first episode of the original Hellsing TV series dub and then the first Hellsing Ultimate OVA (both keep the same voice actors), you can tell there's a huge improvement in the voice actors' quality.
  • The entire Canadian cast of InuYasha—who are often considered to be... not so good—did in fact get better as more episodes came along. When a flashback of the first episode pops up (that happens rather often) in, say, episode 100+, you can notice how much the actors became attached to the characters. Kagome started sounding like a girl and InuYasha stopped sounding like he had an apple stuck on his throat.
  • The original English dub of Berserk was serviceable, but it's clear to see in the dub of the movie trilogy based on the Golden Age arc that the original voice actors (nearly all of whom returned to their respective roles) have improved upon their voice acting talents in the years since the dub of the TV series ended, making for one of the best dubbed anime movie series in recent history.
  • In the first Axis Powers Hetalia drama CD, Hiroki Takahashi starts voicing Kiku Honda/Japan as a very soft-spoken individual. Later dramas and the anime series have him using a much deeper tone, which has greatly confused some fans. (It doesn't help that, in the very first drama CD, Japan was voiced by a woman.)
    • America started out with a voice that was simply loud and enthusiastic in the drama CDs and early anime. Somewhere along the line, Katsuyuki Konishi began to use a MUCH higher-pitched tone for America, which carried over to later dramas and his character songs.
    • In the second season of the series, Atsushi Kousaka used a considerably slower-paced voice for Greece than in the first one.
  • While Lelouch of Code Geass uses different tones of voice when acting as a student and the leader of the Black Knights, in the English dub they both get deeper over time. In retrospect, in the first couple of episodes, his voice sounded somewhat nasal.
  • YuYu Hakusho
  • Slayers took a noticeable step-up in its dubbing between Episodes 13 and 14 of its first season (the 18-month break in dubbing production necessitating a total cast replacement except Lina and Gourry is the reason), and between the first and second series (NEXT). Lisa Ortiz also plays Lina with a distinctly higher pitch during Season 4 (Revolution and Evolution-R) due to being accustomed to dubbing a certain set of games and a 10-year break in dubbing Lina Inverse. Megumi Hayashibara, by contrast, has gone much lower, rougher, and dramatic, whereas earlier seasons had her sounding more girlish.
    • Both Gourry's voice actors (Yasunori Matsumoto and Eric Stuart) and Amelia's voice actresses (Masami Suzuki and Veronica Taylor) are higher in pitch in Revolution and Evolution-R than they were ten years previous. Arguably, both voices, especially Gourry's, are less "forced". Zelgadis's two voices have deepened as well (Hikaru Midorikawa and Crispin Freeman); however, both have little emotional poignancy compared to the first three seasons, and the only time it has it is when he grows angry (namely in episode 10 of seaon 5).
  • The Ranma ˝ anime experienced this slight vocal drift over seven seasons and a new OVA which reunited most of the main cast. By far the most noticeable changes are with Ranma himself: being a Gender Bender, Ranma has two voices, and both Megumi Hayashibara and Kappei Yamaguchi deepen and roughen their portrayals of Ranma over time. Early female Ranma actually sounds like a girl (albeit with the wrong word choice and the like), but by the end of the series run, Hayashibara tones down the cuteness factor and makes Ranma sound more like a boy in a girl's body. This is not by any means vocal decay, however: Hayashibara flips easily from Ranma's default state to deliberately cute in a heartbeat, and Yamaguchi can go from shouting and grunting attacks to charming heartthrob just as fast...at least, until he says something worthy of an Armor-Piercing Slap.
    There's also the fact that male Ranma was Kappei Yamaguchi's debut role, while Megumi Hayashibara already had some years of seiyuu work under her belt. (She debuted in 1982's Maison Ikkoku, and the Ranma anime started in 1989). As the series went on, Yamaguchi got more comfortable in Ranma's skin and adquired more voice-acting experience, thus his performance got better.
    • Aside from the two halves of Ranma, Nabiki's voice deepens considerably as well. Early on, Minami Takayama sounds more like Aoko from Magic Kaito or Detective Conan. It's some time before her voice settles into its final pitch, but by the time it does, her character's Flanderization is complete, and odds are Nabiki's already scammed a good 5000 yen from you. If you're lucky.
  • The English dub of Higurashi no Naku Koro ni was considered amateur at best during the beginning. The voice actors didn't know the story, the director was a newbie, and the dub studio wasn't known for putting out good work. By the end of the first season, the voices were more well rounded and fitting for the characters (with the widely-accepted exception of Rika, which would be a problem for season 2).
  • In the English dub of Naruto, Choji, Kiba and especially Shino originally had nasal and rather high-pitched voices (annoying, loud and creepy respectively) which changed drastically round about the end of the Chuunin Exam arc, partly to do with a more sympathetic portrayal. (Though Kiba still has No Indoor Voice.)
    • Naruto's voice has also improved and evolved ever since Shippuden. Before his voice was very loud a lot of the times and he often said his Catch Phrase "Believe it". But after Shippuden, while he still can be loud, his voice has an overall more calm tone to it and he rarely, if ever, says his Catch Phrase.
  • The performances of the voice actors in Neon Genesis Evangelion become more multilayered and subtle as their characters do. This is true for both the original and English versions, but it is far more obvious in the latter; to get a sense of just how much evolution took place, compare the performances of Spike Spencer (Shinji) and Allison Keith (Misato) in the early episodes with their scenes in The End of Evangelion. The reason behind this was that these were still the analog days of anime dubbing, and ADV only received the episodes two at a time.
  • Due to a half-year break, the the entire dub cast of Bobobo Bo Bobobo has a change in vocal pitch for the remaining 26 episodes: every single actor has a higher-pitched voice compared to the first fifty episodes, especially Gasser's (Brad MacDonald) and Softon's (Joe Ochman), and Beauty's (Philece Sampler) also becomes nasaly. The overall effect (and fan response) was highly negative, and it didn't help that a plethora of cheesy rhyme-schemes and poor dialogue was thrown into the mix.
  • The Lupin III anime side of the franchise managed the impressive feat of keeping almost all of the original Japanese voice actors from 1969 to 2011, except for Yasuo Yamada, who passed away in 1995.
    • Fans started to notice in the 2000's-era TV specials (especially the ones in the second half of the decade) that age was starting to take its toll on the Japanese voice actors, causing the characters to sound older than they looked, and threatening fans' Willing Suspension of Disbelief. The most pronounced example was sadly Gorō Naya, who played Inspector Zenigata; he was diagnosed with throat cancer, making it much harder for him to carry on his role. Writers compensated by reducing Zenigata's part in his later specials.
    • In mid-2011, TMS announced that Naya, Eiko Masuyama (Fujiko), and Makio Inoue (Goemon) would be replaced with younger actors in future Lupin projects, including 2012's Lupin III: The Woman Called Fujiko Mine TV series. Fittingly, the final special with the original (surviving) cast was titled Lupin III The Last Job.
    • Kiyoshi Kobayashi (Jigen since 1969) has not yet been replaced; his voice in the series sounds noticeably older than every other character.
  • In the English dub for Sonic X, Decoe and Bocoe were originally voiced in stiff Robo Speak. As episodes passed however, they slowly began to fluctuate more frequently and eventually gained whiny emotional human-like voices akin to their Japanese counterparts.
  • The Hungarian dub of Transformers Armada started out and still is a relatively cheaply made dubbing work with varying levels of effort put into it, but it went through a staggering amount of vocal evolution around the series' middle-point. This is no surprise — for the first 20 or so episodes, most of the voice actors clearly didn't give a damn, and their performances sounded awfully forced at times, especially while laughing. The reasons for this are not surprising either, since the show started out as an aggravatingly slow and badly placed mess. But after it had gotten better and more characters appeared, all of the vocal performances improved drastically. Starscream can talk fast and convey emotion, Megatron can shout and produce genuine laughter, Hot Shot's actor realized the recording session has started, and Thrust... after several episodes of talking in a bored, monotone voice, he developed a lot of personality with his awkwardly toned and paced, nearly deranged sounding delivery (no wonder, his actor was the original Hungarian voice of Captain Kirk from the Star Trek movies), and actually acted convincingly for the final part of the series.
  • Belldandy's English voice actress in the Ah! My Goddess TV series (Eileen Stevens) needed a few episodes to find her character's voice. She starts out exceptionally sweet, bubbly, and generally high pitched, but a few episodes into the first season, she lowers her voice into a more natural range as Belldandy's character develops. It comes off more appropriate for the caring nature of Belldandy's character as well. By Season 2 (produced after a yearlong break but keeping the same VA's), Stevens's voice has gone even lower as Belldandy herself has become more assertive.
  • Genki from Monster Rancher was played by a child actor in the dub. His actor went through puberty so his voice deepened quite noticeably through the series, almost being inappropriate for a kid his age by the end.
  • Thanks to the nearly ten-year gap between Tenchi Forever and the 3rd Tenchi Muyo! OVA series, it's easy to see how much the original English Tenchi cast had changed in the intern. Kate Vogt, Washu's voice actress, used to have two tones for the scientist - crazy and nasally and a little more hushed and serious. Now, it seems that she just focuses on the crazy and nasally. Matt Miller, Tenchi's voice actor, adds a more deeper tone to his usual "panicky good guy" voice. Jennifer Darling, Ayeka's voice actor, still has that prim and proper tone, but she's noticeably older in voice. Sherry Lynn and Debi Derryberry, Sasami and Ryo-Ohki's voice actors, still sound the same, mostly because they've been using those default voices for ages. Mona Marshall, replacing Petrea Burchard as Ryoko, goes in a completely different direction. While Mona tries to capture Petrea's seductive and rage-prone take of Ryoko, she comes off a lot more nasally.
  • If you watch both the TV series of Vision of Escaflowne and the movie in English, you'll notice VAST differences between Dilandau's voice in the show and the movie. In the show, Dilandau had a VERY squeaky and chirpy kid voice. In the movie, however, it's deepened considerably.
  • In Yu-Gi-Oh!, Dan Green's Yami and Yugi voices were originally much less distinct, they become much lower and higher respectively in the first few episodes, and settle about 7 or 8 episodes in. It's very noticeable if you compare the original dubs of these episodes, with the uncut dubs of them.
    • The case is the same in the original Japanese version. Shunsuke Kazama's performance as both Yugis sound almost identical aside from their respective usage of words. Come season 2, and Kazama's voices become more distinguishable, with Yami Yugi having a noticeably rougher voice.
  • In Bleach, Rukia's voice was higher in the first arcs than today. Since the Arrancar arc, she has her recognizable deep voice.
    • Mayuri Kurotsuchi's voice sounded like Freeza's in the Soul Society arc and Bount arc. Later, his voice has become deeper.
  • Nozomi Yumehara alias Cure Dream from Yes! Pretty Cure 5 had a much deeper voice in the earlier episodes. It's true that Dream's voice is deeper than Nozomi's, but in the early episodes, both sound deeper than the current Cure Dream. Yuko Sanpei later gets quickly used to Nozomi's high voice which also influences Cure Dream's voice.
  • The German voice actor Konrad Bösherz, best known for playing Yugi Muto (not Yami Yugi), had a much higher voice when played he Takato from Digimon Tamers in the preview. The preview was shown in the last episode of Digimon Adventure 02, but Tamers was aired a year later. So, Bösherz got a voice break during the time and Takato got Bösherz' infamous Yugi voice (though, Yu-Gi-Oh! was aired after Tamers).
    • His collegue Carsten Otto got also a voice break during the time gap between the two seasons, that's why it's hard to realize that he played Henry in Tamers and Cody in 02.
    • Karlo Hackenberger who played Wormmon and its digivolutions in Digimon Adventure 02 played it with a nasal, goofy voice in the first six episodes. But he later played it with the recognizable high-pitched and cute voice.
    • Another Digimon voice actor, Ricardo Richter, got a voice break during Digimon Frontier and Yu-Gi-Oh!, resulting that Takuya and Mokuba's voices got deeper. Also, Son Goten has a much deeper voice in the Broly movies than in the series or in the Fusion and Dragon Fist movie (the DBZ movies weren't released chronologically in Germany). The same goes to his collegue Arda Vural who played Kid Trunks.
    • Speaking of Digimon and Dragon Ball Z, Sandro Blümel who played Koji and Son Gohan (until the Cell Saga), respectively, got a voice break, too. While Koji didn't suffer from this, Son Gohan's voice got deeper in each movie, resulting that Gohan's voice became identical to Koji's in the Broly, Super 13 and Bojack movies. That made it impossible for him to reprise his role as Son Gohan in the Garlic Jr. movie (mentioned above, the movie weren't released chronologically), so he was replaced by a kid.
  • The German voice actor Constantin von Jascherhoff played Syrus Truesdale from Yu-Gi-Oh! GX with a similar voice as he played Ryou Bakura (not Yami Bakura) from Yu-Gi-Oh!. When the series went on, Syrus' voice got higher to match his personality.
  • Another German voice actor, Tobias Müller, who plays Shinichi Kudo and Conan Edogawa in Detective Conan plays Conan with an even higher voice than in the earlier seasons.
  • This is one of the problems with Kotono Mitsuishi's return as Usagi in Sailor Moon Crystal - trying to return to that high-pitched younger voice has made people think she's slipped back into voicing Hummy again.

    Fan Works 
  • LittleKuriboh, the sole cast member of Yu-Gi-Oh! The Abridged Series, has got much better at coming up with distinct voices for his characters (and at speaking distinctly while doing those voices) between the first episode and the time the series hit double digits. He has also gotten over his cases of Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping. Compare this to This.
  • Amy's voice on Sailor Moon Abridged started as a hoarse whisper. It gradually became more of a high-pitched warble, which you can begin to hear around episode 12.
  • Jaleel White, who played the role of Sonic in three animated shows, reprises his role in a Sonic fanfilm, with his voice sounding somewhat more like the modern incarnations.

    Film 
  • In the Harry Potter films, Helena Bonham-Carter started off playing Bellatrix Lestrange with a posh accent, which gradually evolved to become more Cockney-sounding. Carter's explanation is that Bellatrix is just so weird that she transcends accents.
    • Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint's voices broke between the first and second movies.
      Steve Kloves: Well, the first thing that you notice when you see the movie [Chamber of Secrets] is that Harry and Ron's voice dropped a good two octaves. That's just really... bizarre.
      • To a much lesser degree, Emma Watson's voice changed between the 1st and 2nd movie too.
      • In fact pretty much every child actor aside from Matthew Lewis (Neville Longbottom) and Alfie Enoch (Dean Thomas) underwent a voice change in between the first and second films.
  • Al Pacino had a youthful, almost nasal, voice from The Godfather to Dog Day Afternoon to Scarface (1983). Eventually tobacco started to take its toll. By the time Donnie Brasco rolled around, wow. This was one of the reasons he didn't return for The Godfather video game.
    • Same goes for Mickey Rourke, although it's been overshadowed by the change in his physical appearance.
  • Happened to the extended cut of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, which was Re Cut some thirty years after it was originally released. Since sync-sound was not recorded during filming (the various actors hailed from different countries and they all spoke in their native languages), the new scenes were never dubbed during the original cut's post production process, the original actors were brought back to dub the new lines. Problem was... they're all thirty years older the second time around (Eli Wallach was pushing on 90 when he dubbed his lines), and it shows.
  • An interesting case with Yoda from the Star Wars movies. When he first appears to Luke Skywalker in The Empire Strikes Back, he seems to be a funny, eccentric creature with a higher pitched voice similar to puppeteer Frank Oz' other character Grover. Later when he reveals himself to be the powerful Jedi master Luke was searching for, he drops the goofy act and also an octave. He then speaks in a deeper, voice similar in timbre to Oz' character Sam the Eagle for the rest of the movie. When he next appears in Return of the Jedi he goes back to the higher voice from when we first met him playing an oddball. It's as if Oz and the filmmakers only remembered his voice from his memorable first appearance. Yoda would continue to speak in the higher voice in the prequels.
    • Carrie Fisher's voice is noticeably huskier in Return of the Jedi than it is in the previous two movies.
  • Sean Connery's deep voice got raspier and his lisp and Scottish accent got thicker over the years after he did the last official James Bond movie in 1971.
  • Marlon Brando's voice as Vito Corleone in The Godfather becomes raspier in the later scenes when the character is older and more frail.

    Live-Action TV 
  • The Brady Bunch: An entire episode – "Dough Re Mi" – was built on vocal evolution ... specifically, Peter's voice entering puberty and breaking at the worst possible time ... oldest brother Greg trying to form a family singing group with his siblings, and (with a non-refundable deposit already paid) having only that opportunity to use the studio to record the song. The voice break was humorously used in the TV version of "Time To Change," with the break dubbed in from the studio recording; indeed, the album and single versions do not feature Peter's "voice break," as Christopher Knight was in tune – as best as he could be, since by his own admission he couldn't sing – during the actual recording of the song.
  • In an unusual live-action example, the same happens to Karen (Megan Mullally) in Will and Grace, whose voice gets more high-pitched and distinctive as the series progresses, arguably as her character's wackier traits are played up, but also as she got more rare serious moments.
  • Actress Pauley Perrette in NCIS: Abby's voice changes noticeably over the run of the show. In the early seasons, it was deeper and more throaty; later, her voice becomes faster and higher-pitched, and Abby's verbal tics become more exaggerated.
    • Ziva's voice got slowly less husky as the season went on, and she lost most of her Israeli accent.
  • Michael's voice in the pilot and early episodes of Burn Notice — especially during his voiceovers — is noticeably higher and more nasal than the one he settled into.
    • Fiona's voice also went through changes, in the pilot she used an Irish accent with her, but soon after she has a more American accent to her.
  • SCTV: Compare the McKenzie Brothers' accents between this skit and that skit.
  • Steve Smith's voice for the title character of The Red Green Show was always a deadpan, gravelly tone, but it started off a little softer, quieter and more hesitant. Over time, he began putting more range and emotion into it, and became a lot less hesitant.
    • Smith's voice in the beginning seasons of the show is closer to his voice in Real Life, but he found using the "Red Voice" as he calls it was surprisingly less stressful on his vocal cords, to the point where he has no problem using it for hours on end, which he found quite useful for personal appearances.
  • Mike Smith's Bubbles voice (and body language) becomes less uptight and forced after the first two seasons of Trailer Park Boys.
  • Beginning in season two of Gossip Girl, Chuck Bass more seldom spoke in the lighter voice he had during season one, and by season three only speaks in a deep, guttural voice which some fans complain make it difficult to hear what he's even saying. After a while his actor, Ed Westwick, confirmed the fan theory that Chuck's voice had gotten deeper because it was easier for the English Westwick to maintain his American accent when he dropped an octave.
  • All three announcers on The Price Is Right have had this happen over time:
    • Original announcer Johnny Olson didn't lose much in the way of energy on Price, although he did get a little more slurred due to old age. However, he sounds noticeably less enthusiastic on the few episodes of Body Language he announced shortly before his death.
    • Rod Roddy (who stayed with the show until just before his 2003 death) initially had a loud, resonant voice that was well-suited for a high-energy game show. Starting in the early 1990s, he became a lot less energetic (likely due to his many health problems), although some of his energy returned in the early 2000s. (For the first weeks of the 2003-04 season, he only announced if he felt that he could handle it, and asked his good friend Randy West to fill in otherwise.)
    • His replacement, Rich Fields, is an interesting variant. Before taking over on Price, Rich announced Flamingo Fortune (1995-99) with a fairly mellow, deep voice. When he started filling in on Price, his voice became much higher and more energetic. Once he became the official announcer, his delivery jumped all over the place as he settled into the role (it's said that he intentionally changed his style to keep things interesting). By the time Drew Carey took over hosting duties from Bob Barker, Rich had pretty much settled into a rather loud, screeching tone.
      • Shortly before the producers decided to let Rich go in mid-2010 (because they wanted an announcer with improv comedy experience, although Rich reportedly had some personal problems as well), he did some post-production work on summer reruns. On these reruns, Rich reverted to the deep, mellow announcing style from his Flamingo Fortune days. He kept this style when he did some substitute work on Wheel of Fortune in late 2010-early 2011, and again on Drew Carey's Improv-A-Ganza later in 2011.
  • And speaking of Wheel of Fortune...
    • Jack Clark, who replaced original announcer Charlie O'Donnell in 1980, left the show in 1988 due to bone cancer that ultimately took his life. Near the end of his tenure, his voice had gotten much weaker. This is most evident on a short stretch of reruns in Summer 1988, where Jack dubbed in new Promotional Consideration plugs for the reruns, and clearly sounded very rough. It quickly reached the point where they just had hosts Pat Sajak and Vanna White do the plugs instead, before M.G. Kelly was chosen as the next announcer that fall. Kelly lasted less than a full season, getting the boot in February 1989.
    • A few months after he returned to the show in 1989, Charlie O'Donnell became a little deeper and less enthusiastic. He returned to his usual energy around 2001, and he actually became more energetic in the 2000s (three words: "Twenty-five THOOOOOOOOOOOUSAND dollars!") despite staying in the lower register. The lower but more energetic delivery stayed mostly intact until his 2010 death and subsequent replacement by Jim Thornton after a rotation of substitutes.
  • In Mork's first appearance in Happy Days, Robin Williams uses a high-pitched voice for his character, emphasizing that Mork is an alien. By the time Mork got his own show, Robin uses his normal voice, although Mork still makes silly high-pitched noises on occasion.
  • Trace Beaulieu's original voice for Crow T. Robot on Mystery Science Theater 3000 was, well, robotic and stiff and has frequently been described as "baby-like." His voice for Crow got more natural and casual as the show progressed and developed. A similar change occurred with Beaulieu's other character, Dr. Forrester, who in early episodes came across as more of a traditional hammy mad scientist.
    • When Kevin Murphy took over playing Tom Servo it almost seemed like he was trying to imitate the voice J. Elvis Weinstein used for Servo. By the start of the next season he debuted a new, deep, rich voice for Servo, but as the series went on he dropped most of the affectations and Servo basically just wound up with Murphy's natural voice.
      • Beaulieu called this the "Jim-Hensoning" of their voices, much like how Jim Henson's Kermit the Frog voice eventually turned into his regular voice.
  • Puberty can do this to any young actor or actress simply by being on a Long Runner or just happening to have their voice break in between seasons:
    • Jake Sisko (Cirroc Lofton) on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.
    • Carly and Freddie on iCarly. It's most obvious with Freddie, whose actor Nathan Kress was barely adolescent during the filming of Season 1, and grew up in a big way during the long break before season 2. It's even discussed on the show itself, with Sam asking what happened to his voice, with 'I dunno, puberty' being the reply. Carly and Miranda Cosgrove's voice grew gentler and less 'whiny'. Sam on the other hand, didn't change at all, because her actress Jennette Mc Curdy had been playing Sam in a lower tone of voice to begin with to suit her character better.
    • Frankie Muniz' voice went noticeably deeper between Seasons 1 and 2 of Malcolm in the Middle.
    • Caused a bit of a problem on Everybody Hates Chris, when Tyler James Williams, playing the main character who's an Expy of Chris Rock, had his voice drop to a register that is quite a bit lower than Rock's.
    • Jaleel White of Family Matters originally voiced Urkel in a whiny, nasal version of his natural voice, and throughout the first few seasons you could hear his voice drop an octave, while still retaining the whininess. But as of the fifth season or so, he started to speak in a squeaky falsetto that only grew more and more bizarre as he aged. It was hard for post-puberty Jaleel to imitate his old voice.
  • Supernatural has the Batman voices. Particularly notable, Jensen Ackles started speaking with a much growlier voice during season 4, possibly in an attempt to out-growl Misha Collins, as he joked. Jared Padalecki's voice change was a bit more subtler, but is extremely notable if you watch the first anime season that is based on season 1 and 2, with Jared dubbing Sam, who doesn't sound at all like he did in the show's first season.
    • Even Castiel didn't have a such a gruff voice in his first appearance in Lucifer Rising.
  • Don Pardo announced Saturday Night Live in his 90s and it shows. His voice had become a lot less booming than it was in the prime of his career (from the infancy of television to the mid-1970s).
  • On Star Trek: The Next Generation, Marina Sirtis originally played Deanna Troi with a vaguely Eastern European inflection, before dropping it entirely from the second season onwards, in favour of a more natural-sounding mid-Atlantic accent. This is still different from Sirtis's normal speaking voice, which is a standard London East End accent. By the time of the second TNG film, Star Trek: First Contact, Sirtis mostly just used her own accent, albeit with her East End inflections toned down.
    • She originally developed the accent as a kind of Betazoid inflection to further differentiate her alien character from the humans. All that effort was destroyed when Majel Barrett first appeared as her mother, Lwaxana Troi, and didn't even bother trying to attempt the accent.
  • On Friends:
    • Rachel started out with a whiny and screechy voice. Starting around the middle of S3, however, it deepened and became a little more raspy. The change was pretty well solidified by the end of S4.
    • Chandler's started out as loud and abrasive, gradually mellowing out and then settling on a very laid back and soft tone. During the first few Season Four episodes especially, you can tell that Perry was struggling a bit with this change in speaking style, as he sounds a little unnatural during those episodes.
      • During the first half of Season Seven, Chandler sounds unusually timid and aloof. This is clearly the result of Perry's drug addictions significantly hindering his performance at the time.
    • Joey's voice became quite a bit richer and huskier throughout the series, due in no small part to LeBlanc's smoking.
    • Monica's voice actually had the exact opposite evolution of Rachel's. It started out as deep and direct in tone but became more high pitched and screechy over the years.
  • Bran's voice on Game of Thrones changes dramatically between seasons two and three.
  • Breaking Bad: Used to signify the parallel development of the two main characters.
  • In the first few episodes of Cheers, Cliff Clavin only speaks with a mild Boston accent, which becomes a lot more pronounced as the first season goes on. This was largely because John Ratzenberger didn't know whether his role would be an ongoing one (he didn't officially become a member of the main cast until the second season), and just used his normal voice in the early episodes, before taking the time to get the accent right after he was given a long-term deal.
  • The Big Bang Theory has Bernadette, whose high-pitched voice was based on the actress' (Melissa Rauch) mother. It was also pitched higher than her natural voice, but in her earlier episodes it was quite softer in tone. Later episodes established her Beware the Nice Ones personality, and her vocal pitch became much "squeakier" to help facilitate those angry moments.
  • Yes Dear: Kim's voice is deeper and more throaty in the final 2 seasons as opposed to her high-pitched whine prior to that. Christine's voice became more gravelly over time.
  • In Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers, watching old episodes from before Goldar develops his highly distinctive voice can be almost bizarre.
    • Power Rangers Wild Force has Jindrax's vocal style undergo a sudden drastic change as the writers decided what they really wanted from the character. In human disguise he's played by the guy who will be his second voice actor, so he sounds pretty much like he will later. When we first see his monster form it switches to a high-pitched, grandiose, and downright unstable sounding voice you'd expect from a Toku version of The Joker or something. But a few episodes later, he's back to the somewhat goofy and down-to-earth voice that's fitting of the Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain who would eventually prove to be a Noble Demon, realize his Bad Bosses aren't very noble, say Screw This, I'm Outta Here!, and ride off into the sunset with Toxica.

    Music 
  • Wynonna Judd started out with a sweet, girlish alto when she was one-half of the Judds. By "One Hundred and Two" (the Judds' last Top 10 hit, in 1991), her voice had started getting a little deeper. When she went solo a year later, she began singing in a much fuller-sounding, husky contralto. Her voice still managed to get deeper in the late 90s-early 2000s, adding Elvis Presley-esque quavers and growls that often result in her sounding like a man.
  • Kenny Chesney is a pretty extreme example. He started out with a high, twangy voice as was common for most male country singers in the mid-1990s. By the end of the decade, his twang was starting to relax, and his voice became mellower. For most of the 2000s, it's very mellow and almost completely devoid of twang (although he still sings out of his nose, and often sounds as if he has a really bad cold). Just listen to the re-recordings of "The Tin Man" and "Fall in Love" on his first Greatest Hits Album in 2001 versus the originals, and the change even in that timespan is noticeable.
  • Similarly, Aaron Tippin began with an almost comically heavy, nasal twang. But starting with "That's as Close as I'll Get to Loving You", he began singing in a deeper, less nasal register with vibrato that made him sound somewhat like Marty Robbins. Even when he does go back into twang mode (e.g. "Kiss This"), he's still way deeper and less exaggerated.
  • Freddie Mercury's voice was youthful and almost ethereal in the early 70's; his voice gradually became heavier, and he started smoking in 1980, which caused his voice to gradually turn huskier. However, when he was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in 1987, he stopped smoking, and his voice lost a little huskiness and became somewhat angelic again, although still very mature.
  • Tim McGraw's singing voice became lower and far less whiny starting with Set This Circus Down.
  • Alan Jackson also became deeper and less whiny throughout the 2000s. He's also lost a lot of his dynamic range, and sounded especially weak on "Long Way to Go" in 2011.
  • Alt-metal band Kutless's lead vocalist Jon Micah Sumrall had a much scratchier, lower voice, and sounded a lot like Scott Stapp from Creed on the band's debut album. He sounded like Scott to a point where if you were half-asleep, you'd mistake the two (the chorus for 'Tonight' is a good example). On the second album and beyond, his voice was higher and much smoother, probably because he wanted the Creed comparisons to stop.
  • Another extreme example came entirely by accident: Bonnie Tyler had surgery to remove nodes on her vocal cords, and was ordered not to speak for several months afterward. She accidentally yelled out in frustration during the vocal rest, and thus developed the raspy voice she'd soon become known for. Her first song with her "new" voice, "It's a Heartache", was one of her biggest hits and her Signature Song.
  • For his first few albums, Tom Waits' singing voice was really only slightly low and raspy. He's become more and more of a Guttural Growler ever since.
  • Roger Daltrey! There's a huge difference between his voice on Tommy and Who's Next.
  • Aerosmith's Steven Tyler deliberately modified his own singing voice for most (though not all) songs on the first two albums (Aerosmith and Get Your Wings). His voice for the song "Dream On" (from Aerosmith) is very different from the more raw singing voice he used for, say, "Walk This Way" (Toys In the Attic, just two years later). He can still turn the trick (live performances of "Mama Kin" and "Dream On" sometimes have him briefly switch back to the modified voice), but unlike the early years, it's no longer his default singing voice.
    • Even stranger is hearing Steven Tyler's vocal style with his little-known pre-Aerosmith band Chain Reaction (whose single "When I Needed You" appears on the Aerosmith box set Pandora's Box): Not only does he sing in a lower, smoother voice similar to the one used for much of the first two Aerosmith albums, but he also has a bit of a Fake Brit accent, seemingly imitating Keith Relf of British blues-rock band The Yardbirds.
  • Metallica's James Hetfield, compare his vocals on Kill 'em All to The Black Album.
    • Even more jarring: Compare his vocals during the band's live shows in the 80's to those of their live shows during the 90's. Particularly in 1993-1994, his voice really struggled with the high notes he used to effortlessly sing in the 80's. And his voice, during the 90's, became quite a bit deeper and huskier due to a combination of heavy smoking and many years of constantly screaming off the top of his lungs (which eventually led to his voice blowing out while recording Metallica's infamous cover of "So What" during the Black Album sessions). In fact, his gradual Vocal Evolution is cited as the main reason why Metallica started tuning their guitars down half a step after Woodstock '94.
  • While Bob Dylan has more-or-less always had the famous nasal gruffness, there have been some subtle changes over the years. On his first two albums he has a Woody Guthrie-influenced drawl. On his other pre-electric albums he almost shouts a lot of the lyrics. On his first two electric albums he went with a plain but forceful way of singing, emphasizing certain syllables. On Blonde On Blonde (1966) he exaggerates that style almost to the point of self-parody. On John Wesley Harding (recorded late 1967) his timbre begins to sound like that which pervaded his 70's work: a sharpness in his louder sections, a hoarseness in quieter ones. A major departure from that was his crooning voice on Nashville Skyline (1969). Bootleg tapes confirm that this was very similar to the voice he used when he first started playing folk clubs in his Minnesota college days, so it was a deliberate change on Dylan's part. Dylan went so far as to hang a Lampshade on this with his version of "The Boxer" on Self Portrait, done as a duet between Classic Dylan and Skyline Dylan. The close of the 70's gave us a wavering, sneering quality to his singing voice, raspy as ever. Starting in the late 80s he developed a strange slurring style that led to all the jokes about him needing a translator. Since Time Out of Mind in 1997 his voice is more noticeably hoarse, so he's adopted a softer style of singing to compensate.
  • Van Morrison originally sang in quite a high register, and even went falsetto on a couple of songs. From the early Eighties, he began to sing lower down to take it easy on his throat, and started sounding like he does now.
  • This was also the case for David Cassidy during his stint with The Partridge Family. A variant of the puberty trope above, his singing voice started out somewhat nasally throughout season one of the series and gradually matured into a lower, more smoother baritone style by 1972.
  • Ray Stevens originally sang in a high, somewhat nasal voice in the 1960s. By the 1970s, he still used the nasal voice on novelty songs, and used a more traditional delivery on ballads that still came across as rather strident. Come the early 1980s, he dropped all affectation and just sang in his natural baritone voice.
  • Cledus T. Judd used to sing in a slightly off-key, nasal twang that one critic described as "Junior Samples on helium", although he used a more conventional singing voice as early as his cover of "Swingin'" on his first album. Over time, he began using his normal voice more often, and when he does use a twangy voice, it's less exaggerated and in-key.
    • Judd also parodied this effect on "My Voice", a spoof of Child Popstar Billy Gilman's "One Voice". In the parody, his voice gets deeper and deeper throughout the song (the last verse by way of studio tweaking), and he laments that he can no longer sing in the childish upper range.
  • Gary LeVox of Rascal Flatts has always had a very high and nasal voice. Once Dann Huff took over as their producer on Me and My Gang, Huff's notoriously bombastic production all but forced Gary to become equally bombastic just to be heard over all the noise. As a result, he quickly devolved into extremely whiny, melismatic over-singing. Starting with "Why Wait", the production finally dialed back down a bit, allowing Gary to use his normal voice, although the whiny melisma still creeps back in at times.
  • Similarly to the above, Richie McDonald of Lonestar changed from a fairly average tenor voice to whiny over-singing once the band shifted its sound from solid country-pop to Power Ballads and strident "family"-oriented songs. They, too, were brought to their sound by way of Dann Huff.
    • And speaking of Lonestar, former co-lead singer John Rich started out with a high, somewhat twangy voice, as heard on "Heartbroke Every Day". He became much more breathy and less twangy on the solo album he cut in 1999note  after being fired from the band. After he and Big Kenny formed Big & Rich, he kept the breathy tone for ballads, but his voice on up-tempos is still noticeably lower and less twangy than it was in Lonestar.
  • Craig Morgan has gotten increasingly loud over time, starting with "Little Bit of Life". This song also started his bad habit of exaggerating his twang ("A little bit of me and yeeoooooouuuu doin' all right"). "Love Remembers" has a nearly operatic Incredibly Long Note at the end, and nearly all of "International Harvester" and "Bonfire" are shouted instead of sung. He has reined in the histrionics a bit starting with This Ole Boy (2012), but the overdone twang has stayed.
  • Over time, Brad Paisley's voice has gotten much softer and lower, also losing the slight twang.
  • British singer Tony Mills of TNT and Shy fame has a voice that evolved from extremely high in the 1980s to a Queensryche-like lower tenor in the 90s and 2000s.
  • Martina McBride started out with an above-average soprano, only belting when the song called for it (most notably on "Independence Day"). Starting with "A Broken Wing", her sound became increasingly pop-oriented, and she began relying more and more on bellowing out melismatic Incredibly Long Notes that showed off her upper range á la Céline Dion. While she's reined in the belting a little bit, she did another very odd switch in mid-2011 with a chirpy, thin, almost Taylor Swift-esque delivery on "Teenage Daughters" (her first release for Universal Republic after 19 years at RCA) even though the rest of the corresponding album (Eleven) has her singing in her usual bombastic style.
  • Similarly, Reba McEntire became increasingly melismatic and theatrical throughout the late 80s-early 90s, developing a very twangy, vowel-bending style. Around 1996, she began singing in a softer, more straightforward voice, and almost never stretches out single words into twenty-some syllables. This was likely a deliberate choice to reduce vocal strain.
  • Bruce Dickinson of Iron Maiden started with a high voice that was capable of doing an Incredibly Long Note at a very, very high pitch. Now his voice is still powerful and operatic but it's noticably deeper. Most easy to notice when he performs the songs from the eighties (which he did then in a higher voice).
  • David Sylvian of Japan started off singing in a high pitched cockney voice which was supposed to be his punk imitation of David Bowie. By the band's third album he'd switched to a melancholic baritone, which got deeper as it went on. In the 2000s he frequently sings in a croaky whisper.
  • Captain Beefheart's voice was a spot-on Howlin' Wolf impression for most of his career, before it degraded to hoarse screeching for his last two albums. This is Harsher in Hindsight because he had multiple sclerosis at the time of those last two albums and didn't tell anyone about it. This disease led him to retire from music and eventually killed him.
  • Simple Minds' Jim Kerr started off with a sort of punk yell, before moving onto a deeper, more angry voice inspired by Ian Curtis, and eventually moving onto a crooning voice which has picked up a sort of Celtic burr. Many fans would say Simple Minds lost their unique appeal when his voice changed.
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers' Anthony Kiedis used to mostly rap and occasionally sing. These days, he mostly sings and occasionally raps.
    • However this can be attributed to the general shift in style that the Band underwent as soon as John Frusciante became their guitarist (and primary songwriter on
      • Kiedis has also developed a much softer singing style since the time of Californication, but especially starting with By The Way. Many fans feel that he does not put enough energy into his vocals anymore.
  • Elton John's voice evolved and changed a number of times. He had a quite clear singing voice as a youth, occasionally slipping into his trademark falsetto. Eventually, at the height of his fame, it became more nasal/throaty and expressive, with focus on his high range and falsetto singing. It got smoother, deeper and twangier by the late 1970's and early 1980's, though falsetto was still used. His throat surgery in 1987 to remove non-cancerous polyps in his throat (antagonized by his bulimia, drug abuse and vocal misuse), led to him turning baritone, with little or no falsetto at all. The voice only deepened with age, particularly by the 2000's.
  • Meat Loaf began with a soaring, operatic tenor equally suited to soft and hard rock tunes when he sang on the Bat Out of Hell and Dead Ringer albums and although he struggled with voice loss and substance abuse issues during the 1980s, it was more or less intact when he recorded Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell and Welcome To the Neighborhood in the 1990s. After that, though, his voice deepened noticably with age and he's developed a bit of a proclivity for using a lot of melisma when he performs live. When his concerts are reviewed, the thing they'll always question is whether or not he's still up to the task of tackling his older songs.
  • George Jones has had both evolution and decay. His voice was much higher on early songs such as "White Lightning", and got gradually deeper over time. With his hitmaking days pretty much behind him in the 1990s, his voice has become less expressive and more weathered, thanks to both old age (he died at age 81 in 2013) and drug and alcohol abuse at the peak of his career.
    • According to this interview with Billboard, he noticed a second change when he gave up drugs and alcohol in 1999: he could no longer hit lower notes like the ones on "The One I Loved Back Then", but he could once again reach the higher notes he sang on earlier songs.
  • Bob Seger deepened in the late 1980s. The change is pretty evident as early as The Fire Inside, and especially true on Face the Promise to the point that he is no longer able to do the raspy shouting that he is known for.
  • Due to substance abuse, Jim Morrison's voice took on a more ragged and worn tone when The Doors went to record L.A. Woman. Oddly enough, it fits quite well with the album's bluesy mood.
  • David Bowie's voice noticeably started to deepen around 1973-74, beginning with The Jean Genie.
  • The Hanson brothers' voices started out high-pitched (they started out in the mid-1990s when they were still teenagers), and have considerably deepened over time.
  • Mike Patton on his first Faith No More album The Real Thing used mostly a nasal voice, which ironically given the rivalry between the two somewhat resembles Anthony Kiedis'. He dropped that afterwards and starting with Angel Dust began his whole Man of a Thousand Voices thing.
  • Rage Against the Machine frontman Zack De La Rocha's voice on Rage's 1993 debut album was higher and sounded teen-like, however through the late 90's and early 2000's, his voice got a lot deeper as he aged.
  • Tom Delonge of blink-182 has a rollercoaster case of this. His voice on blink albums has got slightly higher and more nasal through the years until Neighborhoods came around, having mellowed out to the level he usually sings at with Angels & Airwaves. Ditto for live shows.
    • He'll veer back into oldschool offkey and snotty territory if he's downed a few before a performance, regardless of which band he's playing with at the time.
  • Whitney Houston, in the 2000s, as drug abuse and personal problems began taking their toll, leading up to her death in 2012.
  • Sandy Farina had a youthful, crystal-clear voice when she starred in "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" - cut to a few years later, when she sang 'Body Talk' for "The Toxic Avenger," by which time her voice had become a rough rasp.
  • An obvious example is Barry Gibb, who until 1975, always sang in his natural voice. He discovered his falsetto ability while recording "Nights On Broadway," and made it a trademark of nearly every song.
  • Cristian Machado of Ill Nino. His screams were higher-pitched on the band's first 4 albums, but on Dead New World, his screams were close to a higher death growl.
  • Pekka Kokko of the Melodic Death Metal band Kalmah has over time shifted his vocal style from a high-pitched shriek to a deep gutteral growl.
  • Elias Soriano of Nonpoint's singing voice seems to get edgier and edgier with every album. Compare his vocals on the album Miracle to his vocals on Development.
  • Rodney Atkins started out singing in a high, smooth voice with heavy vibrato, similar to Roy Orbison, on his 1997 single "In a Heartbeat". After a long hiatus, he returned in 2003-2004 as a dead ringer for then-labelmate Tim McGraw on Honesty. Following a second hiatus, he came back again with a higher, more gravelly delivery from If You're Going Through Hell onward. The change in tone over time has also coincided with him finding himself artistically.
  • Buck Owens' phrasing became very slurred after he had throat cancer removed in 1993.
  • Carrie Underwood has gone from belting everything to a more dynamic range. Some songs have her singing more softly (e.g. "Temporary Home" and "Mama's Song"), and she uses a raw, growling tone on "Good Girl".
  • The Bellamy Brothers' voices were a lot higher on their early songs, such as "Let Your Love Flow", in which they also adopt a quasi-Latino accent ("Let your love fly, like a bird on the weeng…") Only three years later, with "If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body Would You Hold It Against Me", their voices dropped into their more familiar registers.
  • On her first two albums, Gretchen Wilson occasionally lapsed into an overdone, screeching tone (most notably on "All Jacked Up"). She became a little more relaxed on her third album, then became noticeably more raspy on her fourth album (which was self-released).
  • John Michael Montgomery's voice was a lot higher on his debut single "Life's a Dance" before settling into his familiar baritone. Starting in the 2000s, his voice continued to deepen, especially on the Time Flies album in 2008.
  • Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant experienced this as the years went by. In the band's early career, he could reach high notes without fail. However, after surgery in 1973 to remove vocal nodes, he experienced difficulty in getting to those notes again whilst changing how he vocally approached songs.
  • Trace Adkins originally sang in a somewhat restrained baritone, and even went falsetto a few times (such as "Lonely Won't Leave Me Alone"). Starting with Chrome, it evolved into a bass-baritone with a more varied delivery, most notably a macho swagger on his up-tempos and a lighter delivery on his ballads.
  • From about "Mistletoe" onward, Justin Bieber's voice finally began to deepen a little.
  • As the lead singer of Boy Howdy, Jeffrey Steele had only a slightly gruff voice. By the time he went solo in the early 2000s, his voice became a lot more raw, and he began shouting a lot more.
  • Pat Monahan of Train became a lot higher-pitched around the time "Hey, Soul Sister" came out.
  • Given that Billy Gilman released his first single when he was only 12, the change was only inevitable. Compare "One Voice" (recorded in 2000) to "Everything and More" (2005) to "I've Changed" (2009). He's still a tenor, but the change from a typical childlike voice to the more mature delivery he developed in his 20s is very striking.
  • When Radney Foster decided to re-record his 1992 debut album Del Rio, TX 1959 in 2012, he found that many of the songs were too high for him to sing, and thus lowered the key on a few. He told Country Weekly that he noticed his voice deepening once he hit his 40s.
  • Charlotte Church once recorded a 'duet'- actually a blend of two tracks, both of herself- one aged twelve, the other being a harmony line to the same song that she laid down aged seventeen. Obviously her voice had developed and 'darkened' considerably in those five years... but it was also clearly damaged, mostly with overuse while still growing (though smoking and her famous Ladette lifestyle probably didn't help.) However, it was now more interesting and suited to the pop tracks that she wanted to move to anyway, as when she came of age she was allowed to choose her own songs.
  • Ryan Clark from Demon Hunter began using Slipknot-esque shouts on their debut album, but, after only one album, switched to an angrier, more nasal, deeper, and more sludgy style of harsh vocals. Compare his screams on Screams of the Undead to his screams on Storm the Gates of Hell.
  • Gary Allan was a lot less raspy on his first few albums. Around the release of Tough All Over (a Creator Breakdown fueled by his wife's suicide), his voice became more gravelly, and he began using falsetto more often.
  • Marianne Faithfull stands out as a prime example of this trope. In her famous cover of the Rolling Stones' "As Tears Go By" she exhibits her already pretty deep, but gentle and varied contralto voice which bears little resemblance to the alto croak she developed after years of substance abuse.
  • Daniel Johnston's voice became rather hoarse by the late 90s, due to him being a chain smoker.
  • MCA of Beastie Boys had a noticeably raspier voice later on in his life.
  • Puberty obviously affected Miley Cyrus' singing voice over the years, as her voice became lower, more raspy and lost a bit of her strong Southern twang. She also seemed to project more around the time of Can't Be Tamed. "We Can't Stop" is certainly very raspy and lower-pitched.
    • She's taking to belting, and even some Melismatic Vocals more since Can't Be Tamed, and in particular on Bangerz.
  • Fellow Hannah Montana star Emily Osment sang with less projection or control and more of a high-pitched voice (granted, she was very young) in the "I Don't Think About It"/"Once Upon A Dream" phase of her career, but gained much more technique and projection by All The Right Wrongs. She still naturally has a high-pitched speaking and singing voice, but it has gotten more mature, deep and projecting over the years.
  • Johnny Cash's voice got a lot more ragged and shaky after he developed Parkinson's in the late 90s.
  • Country Music singer Jessica Andrews, who was 15 when she put out her first single in the late 90s, sounded reasonably sweet and girly throughout her first two albums (the second of which included her only big hit, "Who I Am"). But as early as 2003, she started to develop a huskiness, which was especially evident on her 2006 single "Everything".
  • Modest Mouse frontman Isaac Brock used to sing in a high-pitched pop-punkish manner not unlike that of Dexter Holland. Thanks to a combination of heavy alcohol and drug use, his voice became quite a bit deeper and huskier as the years went by. Listen to "The Lonesome Crowded West" and then listen to "We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank." It's hard to believe this is the same guy singing on both albums!
  • Frank Sinatra's singing voice evolved through his long career. From a mellifluous crooning sound in the '40s, to a cool swagger when he led "The Rat Pack" in the '50s and '60s to a maturity in the 70s, 80s and 90s.
  • Joe Nichols' voice was a lot higher on his little-known 1996 debut album, recorded when he was 19. By the time he released "The Impossible" in 2002, it had deepened to the range it is now.
  • Harry Nilsson lost his glorious original voice when he seriously injured his vocal chords during a drunken "primal screaming" contest with John Lennon, although general drinking and drug abuse didn't help.
  • Jocelyn Enriquez sang in an average "girl next door" freestyle voice on her first two albums, then shifted to the deeper range on her third.
  • When she was in S'Express, Sonia Clarke (Sonique) sounded like a typical black Euro-house diva; it wasn't until she went solo in the mid-late 90's that she shifted to her signature raspy contralto voice.
  • Kelly Clarkson's singing voice is higher in her early albums while the ones released a decade later where it sounds lower and huskier. Part of it is probably the natural aging of ten years. Compare Since U Been Gone and Stronger recorded seven years later, two songs with the same theme. While the former sounds like a girl is singing it, the latter is a woman.
  • Trent Reznor's singing voice has gotten noticeably lower over the years, especially in the slower songs. Compare him doing "Hurt" in the mid '90s to him singing it 10 years later and you'll see a huge difference. He also does less of the screamy parts as time goes on, to the point where he practically leaves the chorus of "Head Like a Hole" to the backing band.
  • Singer Adam Turla's voice seems to get lower on each Murder by Death album; the most noticeable difference is between their second and third albums, Who Will Survive and What Will Be Left of Them? and In Bocca al Lupo, when his singing voice drops almost a full octave.
  • On Black Sabbath's debut album, Ozzy Osbourne's voice is noticeably different; it's harsher and less melodic than later releases. Made particularly noticeable since he's sounded pretty much exactly the same from Paranoid to the present day(over forty years).
  • Scott Weiland's Vocals on Core was pretty much straight up a low baritone yarling style perfectly matching the heavy sound of the album. Purple contained this with a few exceptions. When their third album came along though, he noticeable developed a much higher voice. He still occasionally came back to the old style though (mostly on their 4th album).
  • Danial John of Silverchair has shown heavy changes from 1995's Frogstomp to 2007's Young Modern. Half of this can be due to the fact that he was only 15 when the former was recorded (granted he already sounded like a grown man when singing) while the other half is due to the band's stylistic change.
  • As a general rule, Death Metal vocalists pitch up over time as the genre's signature Harsh Vocals gradually cause damage to the vocal chords. The most jarring example is probably David Vincent, who commonly gets accused of having completely blown chords because of how different he sounds today versus in 1989, but it's practically everywhere among Death Metal veterans.
    • There are exceptions - Ross Dolan has actually gone in the opposite direction, gradually getting deeper on each new Immolation album. Whether it's a natural progression or aided by production trickery is unclear.
  • Michael Jackson. Though fans are quick (read: immediate) to hand-wave the change as proof of an impostor, the truth is that his voice became noticeably weak and strained in the near-decade between "Invincible" and his inevitable death as drugs took an increasing toll on his health, paired with known dental issues that caused him to pronounce words oddly - most evident on the oft-debated "Breaking News": 'Reportersh shtalking the movesh of Michael Jackshon.'
    • The noticeable change in his voice is often pinned on the use of a vocal impersonator named Jason Malachi, whose voice is similar (but not exact) to the voice heard on Michael's later recordings; the biggest difference being a nasal quality, almost an exaggerated whine, that Michael never had.
    • Later on in his life, particularly on "2000 Watts" and "Breaking News," Michael began singing in a much lower register than usual - said by some to be indicative of his actual, private speaking voice.
  • Roger Waters' voice degenerated ENORMOUSLY between 1983's "The Final Cut" and 1987's "Radio KAOS," remaining a painful rasp to this day. For his long-running tour of "The Wall" beginning in 2010, he underwent vocal training to try and improve his abilities, but portions of vocals requiring a flawless and powerful voice (such as "In The Flesh?") were pre-taped while other songs (notably "One Of My Turns") were lowered in key to enable Roger to sing live as much as possible.
  • The smooth, pitch-perfect voice of Brian Wilson, heard on the Beach Boys' early hits, had turned into a gruff smoker's rasp by the late Seventies. He's spent the last couple decades working to overcome this, restoring a fair bit of range - but his tendency to speak and sing out of the side of his mouth corresponding with his hearing ear is more and more evident.
    • And, truth be told, he does enjoy his Auto-Tune. Fans, on the other hand, don't.
  • Rhett Akins' voice has gotten a lot deeper ever since he became less of a singer and more of a songwriter. His debut album came out when he was 26, and his voice still sounded fairly high and young on it. Compare to the noticeably deeper tone he has on Michael Waddell's Bone Collector, which he recorded with Dallas Davidson 15 years later.
  • Axl Rose has gone through so many that you can tell what individual year any given performances is from. As part of Hollywood Rose, his voice was extremely high, fast, and uncontrollable. By the time of AFD, it had becoming more controllable and he used much more octaves while singing. From 1988-1990, his voice was powerful and could do just about anything. In 1991, throat issues caused him to sound like he was gargling glass and he could barely actually sing, instead sounding like he was yelling while spitting up blood. In 1992, his voice returned more to the "classic" Axl sound. In 1993, his voice started getting weaker, with him using a cleaner, less raspy voice more often than in the past. At a one off appearance at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, his voice was noticeably weak and soft. After returning in 2002, he sounded nothing like the Axl of old, altering his style to have no rasp and singing mostly in falsetto. 2006-2007 had a return to form, sounding closer to 1993 than any other era. Then came the 2009-2010 tours, where he was back to 100% razor blade rasp at all times, though most more controlled and in tune than 1991. Due to respiratory issues and possibly from damaging his voice in the 2010 tour, he has reverted back to the 2002 style of very little rasp, sticking mostly to falsetto and generally sounding weak.
  • Rick Astley's voice got deeper and more soulful since his "Never Gonna Give You Up" days. This live recording makes it the most evident, as he sings the song in a lower key, and changes the melody somewhat so that he doesn't have to hit the higher notes.
  • James LaBrie started off with a high, boyish tenor with a very subtle vibrato, as evidenced on his stint in the late 1980s with Winter Rose. By the time of his first release with Dream Theater in 1992 his voice had become stronger and more soulful with a much more pronounced vibrato, as heard on "Surrounded". By 1994 his voice was deeper and more masculine in the lower end but he still retained his powerful high notes, and he had a gruff rasp that he could turn on and off at will, as on "Caught in a Web". Later in 1994 he ruptured his vocal cords vomiting after contracting food poisoning while on vacation, but went back on tour, where he would spice up the songs with additional Metal Scream at every opportunity, against doctors' orders. However, he found himself struggling with high notes and the band's signature epic "A Change of Seasons" was rewritten for the 1995 EP release in such a way that all the vocal lines were significantly lower. When the band returned in 1997 with their new album Falling into Infinity, LaBrie's voice had completely changed. His Queensryche-influenced operatic wail was now replaced with a much more modern rock style voice, the vibrato was all but gone, the soft voice he used on ballads was not as warm, and his high range was severely reduced, as evidenced on "New Millennium". By the mid-2000s he had regained some of his old range (often with the help of falsetto, which he had almost never used before), but his voice became increasingly nasal, as evidenced on the 2006 version of "Innocence Faded". Since then his voice has remained more or less the same (except for his range starting to contract again due to age).
  • Randy Travis sounded a lot more swaggering and forceful, almost like a cross between Conway Twitty and Waylon Jennings, on his 1978 album Randy Traywick (his real name). By the 80s, he evolved into the deep, reedy bass-baritone for which he would be forever known.
  • Neil Young started as a quite conventional 60s folk singer but after a series of small, subtle changes, he had found his own distinctive high tenor voice on 1969s Everybody Knows This is Nowhere. Averted since then, his voice famously hasn't changed even a bit.
  • Project Pitchfork's Peter Spilles used a fairly normal gothic-accented baritone-tenor voice up until the early-mid 2000's, whence he switched to his present death growl style.
  • Decoded Feedback's Marco Biagiotti original performed Harsh Vocals in the tradition of the Hellektro subgenre, but on their recent material, he has mostly changed to a darkwave/futurepop influenced sound.
  • On Covenant's first two albums, Eskil Simonsson was mostly bass-baritone, but afterwards, he shifted towards the higher end of his range.
  • Shania Twain started to sound more strained on the new songs on her 2004 Greatest Hits Album, culminating in a temporary inability to sing (according to The Other Wiki, this was caused by "a pattern of attempting to withhold emotions" that caused "dysphonia, an impairment in the ability to produce voice sounds using the vocal organs as a result of tightened muscles enveloping her voice box"). After she relearned how to sing, she still sounded very strained on "Today Is Your Day" in 2011.
  • Rush's Geddy Lee notably underwent a rather large one- in the early days, he could hit some amazingly high notes, his voice is naturally an "astoundingly high" tenor. See the fourth movement of 2112 for proof of how dynamic his voice was in those days. More recently, he's had a very difficult time hitting the same high notes and when he does, it often actually sounds like he's trying to hit low notes due to a sheer inability to hit those same notes. It's probably simply due to age- he was, after all, about 23 when they recorded 2112, as opposed to in his 60s- but that doesn't stop the fans from whining.
  • Descendents lead singer Milo Aukerman was 19 at the release of their first album, and his vocals mostly consisted of raspy, nasal half-singing not unlike many other punk singers of the early 80s. He kept this tone for much of the 80s, but since 1998's Everything Sucks and beyond, his voice is much clearer and he almost always fully sings.
  • Pantera: Phil Anselmo started out sounding like a cross between Rob Halford and "Justice"-era James Hetfield (with hints of a Southern accent). Thanks to the effects of heroin addiction and screaming/growling on a regular basis, his voice became deeper and more gravelly throughout the 90's. This is especially noticeable when comparing his clean singing voice on older ballads like "Cemetary Gates" to his voice on later ones like "Floods."

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Ten years and a nose condition turned Stephanie McMahon's voice from young and innocent during her debut and bratty in her first heel turn, to raspier during the Invasion and divorce angles (with the occasional high-pitch scream), to deeper, richer and more authoritative from her GM days on.
    • Despite the vocal changes over the years, she's still widely remembered for that screechy, raspy, Harpy-like voice.
  • Compare snooty-accented Hunter Hearst Helmsley and the nasal Degenerate to the guttoral Game, Triple H.
  • Paul E. Dangerously's smooth tones at age 21 are a far cry from the high-pitched Paul Heyman of today.
  • Vince McMahon's has also evolved similarly going from cheerful and bold as an announcer to menacing as the evil chairman to increasingly cartoony to mellow post-haircut.
  • In an inversion of Heyman, Good Ol' J.R. went from higher pitched to much lower over the years.
  • Kofi Kingston ditched the fake-Jamaican accent before his brief feud with Randy Orton.
  • During his heel turn in 2008, Chris Jericho became increasingly monotone week by week. Currently post-"End Of the World", it's lower but more emotive.
  • Bret Hart's voice has taken a noticeably raspy, hoarse sound compared to his youth.
  • Dwayne Johnson started out smooth and slow, became increasingly hammier during his Nation and Corporation stints, became more high pitch during the "Hollywood" Rock era and switching back and forth after his 2011 return.
  • Randy Orton has gone from suave and smooth to a sinister monotone after forming Legacy during his true main event rise.
  • Like his rival Bret Hart, Shawn Michaels' voice has gotten gruffer with age.

    Puppet Shows 
  • The Muppets: Not counting Muppets who have gotten different puppeteers, Gonzo is probably the most notable. His voice has gradually gotten deeper and less scratchy over the years. Just watch the first episode of The Muppet Show and then one of the post-Henson films.
    • When Kermit the Frog was in the first 20 years of his career (1955-1975), his voice sounded deeper, softer, quieter and somewhat stuffy and dull. Beginning in 1976, his voice became louder, more rubbery and less stuffy.
    • Kevin Clash's performance of Elmo changed a couple of times throughout the years, first it was very nasally like Baby Sinclair from Dinosaurs, later it was higher and scratchier, then his voice became a few octaves higher and softer.

    Radio 
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. In the liner notes for the Tertiary-Quintessential scriptbook, Simon Jones (the voice of Arthur Dent) notes that everybody sounded the same, even if they looked a bit different. However, he adds, "Dirk [the producer] says he applied some arcane electronic test that proves my voice has dropped a semitone in the intervening twenty-five years; funny, I always thought men's voices became higher as they grew older."
  • This kind of change is also obvious in Elwood's voice in the House of Blues Radio Hour. He does sound maybe a bit higher-pitched than he did in the movies.
  • Tony Hancock started out quite plummy before dropping into the lugubrious tones he's better known for. The change started before Hancock's Half Hour, but there's still a very noticeable shift over the course of the series.
  • Surprisingly averted with Paul Harvey. Even though he was doing the show up until shortly before his death at age 90, the only time he sounded any different than in the sixties was during a spell of pneumonia which resulted in him sounding very rough.
  • American Top 40: Compare the Casey Kasem of 1970 (the show's earliest days) to his retirement from radio in 2009. His delivery was much different during the early shows (1970-early 1972), before changing into the form that fans know him best for (c. 1973-the late 1990s). By the early 2000s, age began taking its toll, and although he was definitely still Casey, his voice had grown much weaker. Despite the changes in his voice, Casey was still sharp as ever and — approaching his late 70s by the time of his retirement, was still able to show enthusiasm and sell the music that listeners more than 50 (and sometimes 60) years his junior were avidly listening to.
  • Most of the voices in The Goon Show are pretty consistent, but there were a few changes over the years. Peter Sellers originally played Henry Crun with a higher-pitched voice; the change was probably intended to make Crun distinguishable from Spike Milligan's Minnie Bannister. In some of the later episodes, after being temporarily sidelined with laryngitis, Sellers plays Bluebottle with far less falsetto. The most dramatic change involves Milligan's Count Moriarty. He goes from being a competent schemer in series 5 (1954) to a cringing dustbin-dweller in series 9 (1959), accompanied by an astonishing vocal evolution from a deep baritone to a snivelling whine. When the Goons were persuaded to remake some earlier episodes for transcription purposes, the new Moriarty voice didn't fit the old character.
  • All the Big Finish Doctor Who Doctors have rather different voices now, due to age:
    • Tom Baker used his older-sounding normal voice for the Fourth Doctor Adventures BBC box set, and then experimented a bit over his first season of Big Finish Fourth Doctor Adventures while attempting to reach the Fourth Doctor's smoother and more resonant vocal tone, leading to a handful of early stories where he neither sounds like his normal out-of-character voice nor like the Doctor. By his third season he nailed it and sounds virtually no different to his younger self.
    • Peter Davison has picked up quite a bit of gravel in his voice, but claims he feels more comfortable playing the character sounding like that than how he felt playing him the first time around. A lot of fans say the older-sounding voice fits Five's character better.
    • Colin Baker's voice got gravellier, as well as softer and breathier, which goes quite nicely with how much warmer and kinder a character he is in the Big Finish stories than in the show.
    • Sylvester McCoy barely sounds different at all apart from being more confident with the character.
    • Paul McGann sounds quite a lot deeper and more sensual in the audios than he sounded in the TV Movie. Part of this is due to the scripts bringing out darker and subtler notes in the character and his performance evolving to fit, and part of this is due to the bizarre region coding mixup that led to the movie being sped up slightly (slightly raising the pitch of his voice).

    Sports 
  • Mixed Martial Arts
    • Lenne Hardt earned quite a following as the English announcer for Pride events with her wild, screeching pronunciations of each fighter's name, usually coupled with long trilled Rs. This style developed over time, with her first few appearances being completely sedate and unremarkable.
    • Bruce Buffer's early appearances as the ringside announcer for UFC events were much more sedate and conversational, with none of the animated shouting and spinning in place that he displays nowadays.
    • Longtime UFC commentator Mike Goldberg's voice sounded a lot different in his early days. After a few years on the job, his voice became deeper and more blustery.

    Stand-Up Comedy 
  • Comedian Larry The Cable Guy is known for the exaggerated Southern accent in which he speaks while in-character (he's actually from Nebraska). Over time, smoking has given him a lower, raspier voice.
  • Bill Engvall was a major Motor Mouth on his first two albums before slowing down the delivery. Strangely, the slower delivery has coincided with him becoming more of a Large Ham.
  • George Carlin's voice changing is also pretty obvious.
  • Paul Reubens' Pee-Wee Herman character originally had a higher, more nasal voice when he debuted in the late 1970's up until the end of the second season of Pee-Wee's Playhouse. After Playhouse moved to Los Angeles, Pee-Wee's voice dropped slightly, and Paul Reubens' characterization became a lot more abrasive.

    Theater 
  • In Vanities, in addition to the characters' voices maturing, Kathy and Mary progressively lose their Deep South accents.

    Video Games 
  • David Nowlin's portrayal of Sam from the Telltale Games series of Sam & Max: Freelance Police games was originally subdued and rather flat in a possible imitation of Bill Farmer's nasally Brooklyn accent from Hit The Road, being especially noticeable in the first season. However, by season three, "The Devil's Playhouse", his vocal range has become much more clear and expressive. This is acknowledged and lampshaded in Poker Night 2, where Sam states that he's been seeing a speech coach.
  • Solid Snake was originally only slightly, bedroomishly husky-voiced in the dub of the original Metal Gear Solid. Listening to him now, ten years on, he sounds as though he has a minor case of laryngitis. While some of this is down to a deliberate artistic decision to age the character, there's no real excuse for Snake's father being a lot, lot rougher than Snake despite being a lot younger - and the fact that it was that very-rough voice which Snake used in the often-dissliked remake of the original. The voice actor admits that as he himself has aged, it's become harder and harder to do Snake's voice. Where this stops being evolution and starts being decay varies from listener to listener.
    • For a more character based example, listen to the performance of Metal Gear Solid 3 Big Boss and compare to Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops Big Boss. It's clear that David Hayter doesn't become fully comfortable with the character until the latter game.
    • The voice acting in the remake of Metal Gear Solid is pretty uniformly decried as being worse than the original; however, all of the original voice actors except one recreated their roles from the first game. While some of this is They Changed It, Now It Sucks (Vulcan Raven and Sniper Wolf are particularly improved, Snake and Meryl have better chemistry and both handle emotional scenes more competently, and Liquid's accent sounds more convincing), Naomi's totally deadpan voice (especially when compared to her lively and seductive performance in Metal Gear Solid 4); the absence of Otacon's characteristic hesitating speech pattern and improvised 'um's and 'er's to be replaced with an overall, slow speech pattern; dreadful Lip Lock to the point where they completely stopped bothering even trying to maintain lip sync after the torture sequence; and the intonation of several lines being botched so much as to remove all meaning (such as Snake saying 'Oh, I had to take out that helicopter' in a shy way rather than an arrogant way, which no-one would have noticed if not for the line being mentioned by Otacon in Metal Gear Solid 4 as proof that Snake was a show-off) are particularly jarring. Budget and casting issues were blamed for this - story goes that, other than Snake, they weren't going to use the original cast, and it was David Hayter who persuaded the company to bring back the original VAs - for enormously reduced pay. Although, to his own credit, he took a pay cut himself in order to accommodate the return of the original cast.
      • Mei Ling and Naomi in Twin Snakes suffer from a serious case of Not Even Bothering with the Accent.
      • Naomi, but Mei Ling's case suited her character better, since she was at least raised in the States for much of her life.
    • Quinton Flynn's Raiden voice also seems to have gotten deeper and gravellier in Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance.
  • In Final Fantasy X James Arnold Taylor tried showing Tidus' Character Development by using different tones. However, at some parts he sounded highpitched and too cheerful for serious situations. For Dissidia: Final Fantasy Taylor once again voiced Tidus this time showing a consistent tone and a realisitc anger.
    • On the Japanese side, Tidus was Masakazu Morita's debut role and he certainly seemed to overreact and be too emotional at times, sometimes close to cracking his voice. Just like his English counterpart, when Morita revised his role for Tidus in Dissidia: Final Fantasy, he managed to voice Tidus with more balanced emotions.
    • Hedy Buress's portrayal of Yuna, the primary sticking point for many fans of Final Fantasy X, was noticably improved in side-sequel Final Fantasy X-2.
    • It was really due to two reasons: first, in Final Fantasy X Buress attempted to match her dialogue to the Japanese lip flaps exactly, instead of aiming for an approximation like the other (more experienced) actors did. Secondly, in the sequel the English localisation team got hold of the same technology used by the Japanese team to match up the lip flaps to the voices, eliminating Buress' original problem.
  • If you make a playthrough of the two Kingdom Hearts games for the PlayStation 2, you can notice how much David Gallagher, Riku's voice actor, changed. In the first game most of his lines are completely emotionless and dead-sounding (which can be partially justified by the fact the character was in the dark side). In the second he started putting some feeling into it, and in Re: Chain of Memories, he sounds perfectly okay.
    • Also, Richard Epcar in a podcast interview stated that he felt he gave a weak performance as Ansem in Kingdom Hearts II due to the voice direction he was given restraining him as trying (and failing) to imitate Billy Zane's glorious hamminess, and stated that he felt his performance in Re: Chain of Memories sounded much better and sinister-sounding. Fans seem to agree.
    • The Japanese voice of Ansem, Akio Ohtsuka, was similar in that his hamminess in the first game was more grating than entertaining (Billy Zane is preferred even by Japanese players), but in Re: Chain of Memories, he seemed to know what he was doing more and sounded alot more pleasing.
    • The first thing you notice in moving from Kingdom Hearts I to II is that Haley Joel Osment has hit puberty.
  • Luigi's voice in the Nintendo 64 days fluctuated between being a lot higher/deeper than his brother's. But when the Gameboy Advance came out with Super Mario Advance, his voice was standardized to the one we know today, and by Luigi's Mansion on the Gamecube, it stuck.
    • Luigi's voice clips were also often Mario's voice clips sped up and raised in pitch via computers which certifiably didn't help matters.
    • Wario also often switches between a high-pitched voice and a low-pitched voice.
    • It's worth noting that Luigi and Wario actually had different voice actors (Julien Bardokoff and Thomas Spindler respectively) in the Japanese version of Mario Kart 64. The Japanese voice clips were then recycled for *all* versions of the first two Mario Party games and Mario Kart: Super Circuit. Bardokoff's Luigi voice was very high-pitched, while Spindler's Wario was deeper and more gruff than Charles Martinet's portrayal in the overseas version (though a bit more in line with Martinet's later takes). So really, if you want to hear how Martinet's voices for those two characters evolved during the N64 days, you should only pay attention to Mario Kart 64 (non-Japanese versions), Mario Golf, Mario Tennis, and Mario Party 3.
    • Samantha Kelly's Peach started out with a high-pitched and cutesy voice, akin to her previous voice actor Jen Taylor. Over time, though, Peach's voice grew slightly deeper and more mature sounding.
  • In the early Fatal Fury and The King of Fighters games, Satoshi Hashimoto gave Kim Kaphwan a rather youthful voice (outside of his epic Taekwondo-related screams). Around the time KOF 96 was released, Hashimoto had him speaking in a quite deeper tone and kept it that way later, most likely to distinguish his Kim tone from his Terry Bogard one and to reflect the fact that he (Kim) is actually in his 30's. Kim's newest seiyuu, Kazuhiko Nakata, has kept the tradition.
    • Similarly, Masahiro Nonaka's performance as Kyo Kusanagi has become deeper and more relaxed over time. Nonaka himself has stated that it has become a little harder to keep up, since he identified better with the younger and more Hot-Blooded Kyo from the first games than his somewhat Older and Wiser actual self.
    • From KOF 96 on, Eiji Yanou's voice for Kensou became very high-pitched all of a sudden... making the 19-year-old Kensou suddenly sound almost like a 14-year-old. Thankfully, Yanou managed to fix it around by the time KOF XI rolled in.
  • In the Japanese version of the Star Fox franchise, Falco and Slippy's voices (Hisao Egawa and Kyoko Tonguu) have played them since Star Fox 64, and both of them have changed notably; Falco's voice is far deeper and mannish, while Slippy's voice is far less feminine than it was in 64. Also, Leon's voice (played by Shinobu Satouchi) is low and smooth in 64, but high and slightly flamboyant in Star Fox Assault and Super Smash Bros. Brawl.
  • Mass Effect - the biggest single change is probably Tali, whose voice is a lot higher (and less accented) in the first game than the following two. Also, whether you're talking about Jennifer Hale or Mark Meer, Commander Shepard's voice changes noticeably as they become less of an Escapist Character and more jaded.
  • Comparing the voice of Sonic from Sonic X and Sonic Unleashed, it's hard to believe that he had the same voice actor back then. Even fans who liked him before the evolution noticed and approved.
  • When Spyro was voiced by Tom Kenny his voice became deeper from 2 to 3.
    • Gregg Berger's voice for Hunter the cheetah from the Spyro series changed between Ripto's Rage and Year of the Dragon. His voice in the former was very low and gruff and in his next appearance his voice is much higher pitched and has a more relaxed 'surfer dude' like dialect.
    • Pamela Hayden's voice for Bianca also became more helium pitched and cheery in Enter The Dragonfly, compared to her take in Year Of The Dragon which was more low and deadpan.
  • In the Crash Bandicoot series, Debi Derriberry's take on Coco was initially rather high pitched and feminine. Throughout the titles her voice eventually became deeper pitched and more obnoxious sounding, a tone much akin to one of Derriberry's other roles.
  • Christopher Robin Miller's voice for Professor Layton has certainly improved, mostly in the British-ness sector. If you compare his Layton voice in Professor Layton and the Curious Village and his Layton voice in Professor Layton and the Miracle Mask, you can probably pick up that, for instance, while he has a rather crudely done British accent in the former, he has a calmer, more natural British accent in the latter.
  • In Warframe, the voice of the Lotus has changed quite a bit across the Updates, only partly due to change of the filters used.

    Web Animation 
  • Nearly all of the voices for the various characters on Homestar Runner have evolved over the years. To name just two examples, Homestar's voice became lower-pitched and less childish, while Strong Bad lost his Mexican accent in favour of a more gruff American one.. The latter was lampshaded in the bonus email "accent" on the "strongbad_email.exe" DVD, where Strong Bad started to worry about the softening of his accent, and tried to get his old voice back.
    • In fact, in one Strong Bad Email, they parody the very first Homestar toon they made by reverting to the old style, having a hatless Homestar, overusing the expression, "Holy crap!", and using Strong Bad's Mexican voice.
    • Bubs originally had a low, gruff voice. Starting from 2004, his voice became a bit more high pitched. Whereas he used to sound somewhat like Louis Armstrong, it was noted that he now sounds like Larry from Limozeen (the Fake Band in the same series; both characters are voiced by Matt Chapman) without the falsetto.
    • Strong Sad is especially notable, as his voice went from nasal to a soft falsetto. He also typically sounds much more upbeat today, possibly because his character has expanded beyond just being The Eeyore. It was gradual, but a modern Strong Sad sounds absolutely nothing like the Strong Sad heard in In Search of the Yellow Dello.
  • In the beginning of Red vs. Blue Caboose sounds completely different than how he does now. At first he sounds normal, but due to textbook Flanderization he has gotten more idiotic sounding, halting and slow. It has happened to nearly every character to a minor extent, but Caboose is so different, it's disorienting..
    • Caboose's idiocy is explained that his mind was broken beyond repair when the evil AI controlling him at the time was ripped from his head. In addition to this, dvd extras suggest, if not state outright, that, when Caboose's mental image of Church was killed, he lost all the knowledge he'd ever been taught by Church.... which the extras go on to say was quite a lot, apparently.
    • The combination of Vocal Evolution and Flanderization was so pronounced in Caboose that one of the alternate endings to episode 100 had every episode since episode 9 revealed to be All Just a Dream, returning Caboose to his original voice and characterization.
    • Also, the original Sarge voice was based off of R. Lee Ermey. The voice actor, Matt Hullum, decided that the voice was too hard to keep reproducing, and came up with the current style. During the Season 4 DVD commentary he manages to find the old voice and then repeats the "Simmons is in charge of confetti" line from the very beginning of season one and then does the same line in the current voice. The difference is night and day.
  • The voices of the characters of A Day With Bowser Jr who were voiced by its author, Dannywaving, underwent an evolution as Dannywaving himself matured over the years. The most notable example of this is Bowser Jr, whose voice starts from almost unbearably raspy and high-pitched in the first videos to more mature in the latest ones.

    Web Original 
  • Ever since he started doing short videos about video games and talking really fast in them, Yahtzee has refined his British yelling voice a fair bit. In fact, going back to some of the very first videos he ever made will near-inevitably make his former self come across as extremely mumbly in comparison to later videos.
    • He also speaks much slower and calmer in his earlier videos when compared to his more later ones. Try watching his two separate Tomb Raider videos he made two years apart; he sounds very different.
  • YouTube video maker PyramidHead87 has changed his "Pyramid Head" voice from a whiny rasp to a deep growl over time (in part caused by his change in recording equipment). This received a Lampshade Hanging at the beginning of his review of the RoboCop NES game, when he opens with the original voice and then clears his throat before going into the new voice.
  • YouTube Let's Play maker Sir Ron Lionheart can attribute some of his popularity to his dramatic change in voice and speech patterns. Compare his first video to basically any video after his Super Mario 64 Let's Play, and you won't believe it's the same person. If you watch his Super Mario 64 Let's Play from the beginning, you can more or less pinpoint exactly where he was driven insane.
  • On early episodes of Atop the Fourth Wall, Lewis "Linkara" Lovhaug had a noticeably calmer, quieter, slower delivery. Similarly, the first appearances of 90's Kid had Lovhaug using a slightly deeper and less hammy voice.
  • And for that matter, Doug Walker's voice for The Nostalgia Critic was originally his regular voice, instead of the more dynamic and broader tone he uses in-character. He also never used to scream like a little girl, instead seeming like he was genuinely angry.
  • Ditto with The Cinema Snob, who had a snobbish monotone in earlier episodes. In a later one, he reminisced about a previous review and briefly adopted an impression of his contemporaneous voice (and vocabulary, for that matter):
    Snob: I guess it wasn't "Kafka" enough for me.
  • Going the other way, Mathew Buck (aka Film Brain) has become much higher-pitched as of the 2013 episodes of Bad Movie Beatdown.
  • Dax Flame's voice was a lot calmer in his earlier videos.
  • ForrestFire101, most commonly known for his "LEGO Batman" series, has, along with the quality of his videos, dramatically changed his voice over three years. In his first video, and several afterward, every character sounded exactly the same. However, watching this video, you can notice, aside from the slew of other "famous" YouTube voice actors, that his Batman and Robin voices are severely different from each other, let alone themselves in his earlier works. The scary part is, if you watch all of his LEGO Batman videos in order of release date, you'll barely notice the changes between videos.
  • raocow started off with a much mellower voice and thicker French Canadian accent. As he developed his Talkative Loon personality for his Let's Play videos, he began using a higher-pitched, crazier tone of voice to match. He also became more fluent in English, to the point that it's hard to tell he's French Canadian. Even when he does a video out-of-character, his voice sounds nothing like it did on his early Let's Plays.
  • The Nostalgia Chick originally had Lindsay's own Tennessee-tinged, typically feminine, quite lilty voice. Now she has a much lower sound, growlier and fitting her "ladette alcoholic who stopped caring" personality.
  • Phelous has gotten a bit more energy and sped up a bit more compared to his first couple of outings where he was more monotone and slowpaced.
  • In Glove And Boots' early videos, Mario had a higher voice and an almost Canadian-sounding accent - later on his voice got lower and the accent got more ambiguous - compare this early video to a more recent one.
  • The Angry Video Game Nerd's actual voice has stayed pretty consistent throughout the series' run, but you can definitely hear a gradual improvement in his public speaking skills over the years. Strangely, in 2011, he spoke in a much lower and mellower tone than usual, which made him sound more irritated than angry (Word of God suggests that this is because his heart was not really into making AVGN videos at the time, being that he wanted to begin work on the AVGN movie). Fortunately, in 2012, he returned to his normal pitch/aggression and now sounds pretty much the same as he did six years ago (except more relaxed and confident).
  • Cecil, The Narrator of Welcome to Night Vale, is always NPR smooth and sonorous, but as his character develops throughout the series he becomes more emotionally dynamic. This is especially obvious in the first anniversary episode "One Year Later", which begins with an Ironic Echo of the intro from the pilot. The words are almost identical but the reading has changed drastically.
  • Arin and Ross have both discussed this on Game Grumps and Steam Train respectively, the two not realizing how much their voices have changed over the years until they looked at their older works, with Arin's voice deepening and Ross's voice becoming significantly higher and losing his Australian accent. Arin attributes it to a combination of age and straining his voice due to how much he has to record, while Ross attributes it to living in America.
  • In Dragon Ball Z Abridged, Vegeta's voice was much lower and growlier in the first series. It's still raspy, but a little less like Christopher Sabat's performance. Krillin's voice also got higher and goofier as the series went on.

    Western Animation 
  • Blinky Bill:From Season Two, Keith Scott began voicing Nutsy's father in a deeper rougher voice than in the penultimate episode of Season One.
  • Family Guy has had conspicuous vocal changes, especially with Lois' voice actor Alex Borstein, who nowadays could give even the best Fran Drescher impersonator a run for their money. This was lampshaded in the episode "Petarded" when Lois, speaking at a microphone, says, "I'm sorry folks, this... Oh God, is that my voice? God, it's all whiny and nasally and... egh."
    • In an early episode, actors are hired to replace the Griffins on a reality show... and Lois is played by Fran Drescher.
    • Her Hungarian voice actress does actually voice both her and Drescher, giving the joke an all new layer. And yes, even her voice has risen over the seasons. As did Peter's, for that matter.
    • Lois used to sound exactly like she was born and raised in Cranston, RI. Key term, used to...
    • Stewie sounds significantly less like a Rex Harrison impression than he did originally, mainly he's less over the top and lost his faux-British accent completely by the sixth season and now talks like a normal gay guy instead.
      • Hungarian Stewie started out sounding nothing like the original. His actor focused too much on the evil part, turning his sentences into barely intelligible mumbles and growls, and every line sounded the same. After a while, he began using his normal, speaking voice... well, he should have done that from the start, because now he's a fan favorite.
      • Interestingly, the opening sequence briefly rerecorded Stewie's lines to match the Vocal Evolution during Season Three, though reverted back shortly after the Uncancellation, making the difference all the more noticeable.
    • Everyone speaks much more quickly, especially Brian and Lois. Pitch has generally slid upward, as well.
    • Chris' voice was originally a Buffalo Bill impression, but as time has gone on, it has gotten much higher in pitch.
    • Herbert the elderly pedophile originally spoke in a slow, soft, effeminate voice with a whistle and a lisp, after about his fourth appearance he talks faster and more flamboyantly, and the whistle and lisp have vanished.
  • Compare Tony Anselmo's performance as Donald Duck in the first episode of DuckTales (1987) to his performance in Kingdom Hearts II (2006). It was rather rough around the edges when he originally took over from Clarence Nash, but has improved considerably in the past 20 years.
  • The Simpsons
    • Dan Castellaneta's original performances of Homer Simpson sound almost nothing like the current character — in fact, the difference is so pronounced that it's hard to believe it's the same voice actor. But this is decidedly a case of evolution rather than decay, as Castellaneta found the original voice (based on Walter Matthau's) difficult to sustain or put force behind, so he changed the tenor deliberately.
    • This is parodied with the M.U.G.E.N character based on him. One of his intros has the Tracy Ullman Show version declaring, "Let's all go out for some chocolate frosty milkshakes" - and then transforming into the modern Homer, who promptly screams, "OH MY GOD!"
      • Homer is also an in-universe example, as a flashback of Grandpa Simpson's reveals that young Homer had an incredible singing voice as a choirboy, right up until he hit puberty in mid-solo.
    • Julie Kavner distanced Marge's voice from her natural tone as seasons progressed, gradually making her higher and wackier-pitched.
    • Nelson's voice has changed considerably over the years. It used to be higher pitched before becoming low and gruff sounding.
    • Police Chief Clancy Wiggum originally had a much deeper, more gruff sounding voice, closely mimicking that of Edward G. Robinson. Hank Azaria gradually found him slipping into a more high-pitched, whiny sounding voice.
    • Yeardley Smith's Lisa voice is noticably a lot less high-pitched than it was in the earlier seasons.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants
    • While Tom Kenny has always been the voice of SpongeBob, starting in Season 4, Kenny has made him ridiculously more high-pitched and effeminate, adding to that ever-present "SpongeBob is gay" notion. Fortunately, the thought has been around for so long that most people don't really even care any more. Some people believe SpongeBob was recast due to an internet rumor that Kenny is dead, but he is alive and well.
      • Patrick and Squidward's voices have also changed over the years, though not as noticibly as SpongeBob's. Patrick's voice is more oafish sounding and Squidward's voice is more resonant.
      • Plankton's voice changed from a gruff, low voice to a higher pitched one, akin to his Ineffectual Sympathetic Villain persona.
      • Karen's voice is deeper and more monotonous now than in her early appearences.
      • Mr. Krabs, Sandy, Mrs. Puff, and Larry are the only primary characters whose voices have remained escentially the same since day 1.
  • Aang of Avatar: The Last Airbender has a voice actor who started off around the same age as him (twelve), and the recordings were mostly done in a linear order. This meant that as the episodes continued, his voice deepened and broke naturally with Zack Tyler Eisen's. Listening to anything from the first season to anything from the third season — especially "Day of Black Sun" onward — will really throw this into light. Because of the production lull, by the end of the series they actually had to start pitching Zack's voice up a little.
    • The same happened to his German voice actor.
    • Zuko has a distinct lisp during the first season, which made him an odd mixture of sinister and somewhat childish. The lisp goes away with time, and by the third season Zuko had developed a more confident, almost parental voice. (Particularly effective when giving rousing speeches.) Of course, this was probably a deliberate creative decision than just evolution. He's also a rare exception of a high-school age character in a western cartoon who gets less whiny-sounding over time.
  • Many a cartoon that takes place in a High School setting feature boys whose voices become whinier as time goes on... when it should be the exact opposite. Ron Stoppable of Kim Possible is a prime example of this.
    • Come season four, Kim herself has become quite nasal and her pacing at times feels intensely rushed.
    • Drakken is a similar example, and there's a major difference in his voice later in, mostly getting higher.
  • As are Danny, Tucker and Dash in Danny Phantom. Danny is the least apparent simply because his 42-year-old voice actor barely sounded like a 14-year-old boy to begin with. Granted, Butch Hartman did hold auditions for actual 14-year-olds, but didn't find any to sound "heroic" enough. Alas, Reality Is Unrealistic.
    • Vlad has this, too. Watching his first appearance in Bitter Reunions is always a bit strange. His voice is more nasal, and has an American accent. Later on, Mull hits his stride with Vlad's voice, no more nasality and he even adds in a slight British accent.
  • In the first Brother Bear movie, Koda was voiced by a young boy. In Brother Bear 2, his voice sounds like it's clearly breaking and going through adolescence.
  • Futurama
    • Over time, Billy West's voice for Fry became closer to his natural voice. He once said that he initially modeled Fry's voice after his own when he was around twenty-five. As Billy got closer in age to Fry in-universe, his voice naturally became more accurate.
    • Professor Farnsworth's voice has gotten deeper and less nasal from the early episodes. It was initially intended to be very similar to Fry's voice, as a nod to the two being distant relatives, but was quickly changed after the producers realized that viewers with impaired eyesight wouldn't be able to tell whether Fry or the Professor was meant to be speaking.
    • Leela's voice has gotten slightly higher pitched since The Beast With A Billion Backs. In the earlier episodes, Leela sounded more like a pitched-down version of Peg Bundy (which is actually Katey Sagal's voice in real life and how Peg sounded on the first season of Married... with Children back when Peg actually cooked and did housework, even though she was bad at both).
    • While John DiMaggio's Bender voice remained pretty consistent throughout the series during its original run, in the feature length films (made four years after the end of the series), Bender's voice is somewhat less raspy; it's probably closer to the voice he used to play Elzar (or Bender from the very early episodes of series one - it sounds a bit gruffer in series two).
  • About halfway through the first season of Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, Bloo's voice gets more high-pitched and whiny, probably to better reflect the changes in personality he went through at that time. He has been getting progressively screechier ever since.
    • On the other hand, Mac's voice became a bit deeper towards the end of the first season and goes even lower during season three due to his voice actor going through puberty. Works good enough.
  • DCAU
    • Kevin Conroy's voice for Batman is much different now than it was when he first started. His initial Batman voice was deeper and had a bit of a growl to it. Starting around the time of the revamped series, his voice became higher and less gravelly. If you watched some episodes of Batman: The Animated Series and Justice League Unlimited, it wouldn't be that strange to think they were voiced by different people. Unfortunately, he also stopped bothering to differentiate between Batman and Bruce Wayne's voice. (On the commentary track for Batman Gotham Knight, Conroy stated that he was requested to do so at the producers' behest.) Bruce originally had a lighter and more playful tone than Batman's dark and foreboding tone.
      • Conroy made the differentiation for at least one episode of Justice League where Bruce Wayne had to make a public appearance. Other than that, Conroy's stance is that Bruce Wayne is the act, and his performance reflects that.
      • Some of the shift is a deliberate choice. Conroy has said that the voice used for Justice League was splitting the difference between B:TAS and Batman Beyond as an reflection of the character aging.
      • As the DCAU went on, the Batman became more obsessive and generally brooding. For Batman, the higher, lighter Bruce Wayne voice was the act, he uses the Batman voice when he's alone with Alfred in the Batcave. Also, as the years go by we see Bruce Wayne fade away into the recesses of Batman's psyche, to the point that in Beyond we hear Batman state that he doesn't call himself Bruce inside his own head. The diminishing presence of scenes with the Bruce Wayne voice could be argued to be character development.
      • However in the Batman: Arkham City DLC Harley Quinn's Revenge Kevin returned to a really deep gravelly sound similar to his original voice. This was likely deliberate to show Batman's sadness after the death of the Joker and Talia al Ghul at the end of the main story. But since then, his Batman voice hasn't been very consistent.
    • Also, Mark Hamill's version of The Joker? He sounds slightly uninspired at first, but with time, he got a lot more quirks and other things with his voice, in Batman: Arkham Asylum, he's probably at his absolute best! Hamill himself said that doing Mask Of The Phantasm was a big step in the Vocal Evolution, as that was when he really started building a repetoire of laughs. The Batman Beyond movie was another step up. Voice director Andreas Romano told him to be subtler for more of a Hannibal Lecter effect so he used a voice closer to his natural voice, which contrasted with the even stronger laughs to chilling effect.
    • Loren Lester spoke with a lower voice when portraying Dick Grayson as Nightwing.
  • South Park. Keeping in mind that the vast majority of the voices are Trey Parker and Matt Stone, with the pitch increased in Pro Tools for the four main characters, the individual voices have still shown considerable evolution.
    • Cartman's voice has gotten lower and less raspy over the years. He was often nearly incomprehensible in the early seasons, but now his dialogue is quite clear.
    • Stan and Kyle's voices have also become lower in pitch since the first couple of seasons. Stan kind of sounded like Gohan as a kid until about season 3.
    • After taking over for Mary Kay Bergman following her death, Eliza Schneider gradually evolved her initially near identical take on Wendy, similarly making her deeper and less shrill sounding. By the time Schneider left and was herself replaced by April Stewart, the child-like tone in Wendy's voice was completely gone. April Stewart would later state that Parker and Stone encouraged her to make Wendy sound more "mature", and that they decided to use less pitch-shifting for the character. A notable difference between Bergman and the later actresses is that while Bergman was able to naturally produce the high-pitched childish voice, Schneider and Stewart had to have their voices digitally tweaked.
    • Clyde originally started out with a higher voice, almost like Butters' (although still voiced by Trey Parker). His voice would gradually deepen as he became used more.
    • The cast as a whole has also gained a much more impressive vocal range than before, better for conveying neuroses or hammy moments from the characters, compared to the earliest episodes, which had a much stiffer, almost Peanuts-esque lack of enthusiasm.
  • The voices in Ed, Edd n Eddy have changed over the years. Ed's voice sounds goofier and less like a frat boy, Edd's voice used to sound quiet, less emotional, and raspy, Jimmy's voice was slightly incoherent throughout season 1 and early season 2, and Rolf's voice used to have a thicker accent. The most interesting case was Nazz, who had 3 different voice actresses throughout the course of the series. It's similar to the Wendy example above, except that Nazz's original voice actress is still alive.
    • It is notable that Jimmy was voiced by an actual young boy whom surprisingly was not replaced after he had gone through puberty, the change in his voice in most noticeable in the Holiday specials.
  • At the beginning of The Venture Bros., the Monarch used to sound a lot more subdued compared to the loud shrill he has now. Not really a bad thing as the shrill is a lot funnier.
    • Dr. Girlfriend's voice was made slightly more feminine after the first season, making it a little more believable as a woman's voice.
    • In Jonas Jr.'s first appearance, he sounded like a raspier version of Rusty. In his later appearances, he sounded much more like his Smug Super father, Jonas Sr.
  • Looney Tunes
    • Some of Mel Blanc's voices started to sound softer and more like his normal speaking voice as the years wore on, though the fact that at least two of them (Daffy and Tweety) were originally pitch-shifted probably didn't help. In Daffy's Quackbusters it's very noticeable, especially if they played a clip from an episode then switched back to the main story his Daffy and Porky Pig noticeably sounded older and less high-pitched. This was perhaps most noticeable with Yosemite Sam, who by the 1970s, basically sounded like Mr. Spacely from The Jetsons, who Mel Blanc also voiced.
    • One of the most striking cases is the early short "Elmer's Pet Rabbit," which was recorded earlier but released after Bugs' official first appearance. Bugs Bunny doesn't have a hint of his trademark Brooklyn voice and instead speaks in a very loud, baritone voice. Were it not for the fact that Blanc was known for several different voices, you'd almost think they'd originally cast a completely different actor.
    • Blanc's voice for Marvin Martian started out sounding like a bad Droopy Dog impression before evolving into the deep squeaky voice he's known for.
      • Jeff Bergman's voice for Bugs Bunny has visibly changed since the 90's to the point that it sounds almost nothing like Mel Blanc's Bugs.
  • Nearly everyone in the cast of Daria did this to some extent over the years. But most noticable is Jane Lane's Wendy Hoopes who originally gave the character a sly, high pitched tone which would eventually evolve into a deep, round tone by season five.
    • Jake, Kevin and Brittany were also much lower pitched earlier on, and Mr. DeMartino was a lot quieter. And of special notice is that Daria's voice became more monotone as the series went on. Overall, it's pretty fair to say that almost everyone's voice is unrecognizable as their later incarnations in the first season or so.
  • Jim Cummings' performance as Darkwing Duck is noticeably lower-pitched and less hyper in earlier episodes.
  • Likewise, his Tigger voice has gotten more breathy, almost like an old man, from The Tigger Movie onward. And before anyone asks, no, he's not really all that old.
  • Most of the main cast on Animaniacs:
    • Wakko (Jess Harnell) more closely resembled Ringo Starr earlier on before going higher-pitched.
    • Yakko (Rob Paulsen) originally had more of a "tough guy" tone to him.
    • Dot (Tress MacNeille) started to lose her cute squeak and started to sound more like Tress's natural voice.
    • Also, in the earliest Pinky and the Brain shorts, Pinky's voice (also Rob Paulsen) was a little deeper and had more of a speech impediment, while The Brain (Maurice LaMarche) sounded more like Orson Welles.
    • Skippy Squirrel's voice deepened over time, due to his voice actor (Nathan Ruegger, the then-preteen son of writer/producer/director Tom Ruegger) hitting puberty in the later seasons. A couple episodes near the end of the run have him pitch-shifted.
  • George Lowe began voicing Space Ghost very straight, much like the superhero Space Ghost was supposed to be. As time went on and the show became more surreal and anarchic, he gradually loosened up until he was essentially voicing Space Ghost with his natural speaking voice, although he would drift back towards the archetypal hero-voice if the script called for it. Zorak changed too, keeping the gravelly insectoid rasp but losing the stiff robotic inflection.
  • If you watch some of the earliest Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog episodes, you'll notice that Scratch and Grounder talk quite differently from their later performances — Scratch is voiced with a New York-influenced accent, whereas Grounder has a lower, stupider voice. These attributes disappeared over the course of the series. (Grounder still sounded dumb, but less so.)
    • An odd case in the German dub: Gerald Paradies and Oliver Feld had already adopted voices for the henchbots right from the get-go, but during the flashback in the first episode, Feld's voice for Scratch was really his own (up to the line "Mein zwillingsbruder? Bin ich so haesslisch?!"); then when he first interacts with Grounder, Feld switches back to the previous voice. Also, Paradies' Grounder also got slightly higher over the episodes.
  • In the pilot episode of Sonic Sat Am Princess Sally's voice sounded more younger and shrill. For the rest of the series, Kath Soucie used her natural speaking voice, albeit with occasional slight fluctuations between lower and higher pitched.
  • Danny Cooksey's voice for Montana Max on Tiny Toon Adventures was noticeably higher in earlier episodes. Not surprisingly, he was the most prominent child voice actor on the staff.
    • Also, Charlie Adler's voice for Buster is a tiny bit higher in some of the earlier episodes. This is especially noticeable in "Cinemaniacs", one of the first episodes to be recorded; he sounds pitch-shifted.
  • Phineas on Phineas and Ferb got a little lower after the pilot. Compare how he sounds in the title sequence to how he sounds on the show proper. Once again, this is the result of the voice actor aging, as Vincent Martella was 15 when he first started voicing Phineas.
    • If you're comparing later eps to early eps, the age is the main reason. If you're comparing the present voice to the title sequence, though, remember that Phineas lightened up after the first few eps. The way he sounds in the title sequence is more in line with that earlier characterization.
    • In addition, Ferb's voice has gotten lower, Isabella's and Baljeet's became higher pitched, and Buford's is less gruff than it was in the early episodes.
  • In another case of child voice actor equalling changed voice, Nicky Jones started voicing the title character of Chowder when he was 11. Come the third season, he sounds noticeably older.
    • Panini, too, for that matter. Her voice actress started voicing the character at age 13.
    • Mung Daal, in the Pilot, had a high pitched, cracking voice, much like a stereotypical elderly man. As the series goes on, his voice deepens and has traces of some kind of accent. Truffles' voice also gets progressively lower and grumpier, which is ironic since her high-pitched shrieking is flanderized in-show at one point.
  • The Fairly Oddparents. Cosmo's voice was always provided by Daran Norris; though his voice went from deep and intelligent sounding to extremely high-pitched and whiny. It may sound like Norris was replaced, but he wasn't.
    • Timmy's voice was a little lower in season one than in the rest of the show.
  • Time has been very good to Peter Cullen in his Optimus Prime roles between The Transformers (1986) and the Transformers live-action film series.
    • This is also apparent in the G1 show itself. Slag of the Dinobots is probably the most notable example; his voice was very gruff and low, but starting in the movie, Slag started to lose some of his lower quality. Even Neil Ross, his voice actor, is unsure of how Slag got so off track, since the voice director would usually give play a sample of what the character sounded like if they got off track. Skywarp is another example; his voice seemed to fluctuate in every episode he appeared on. Mixmaster's first line in Heavy Metal War is very different-sounding from his later lines, being lower and less crazy.
    • When Frank Welker returned to being Megatron in Transformers Prime, his voice had become much quieter and more sinister rather than "screechy". It was very deliberate on Welker's part: the G1 version, higher, screechier, and even a little ill-sounding, was always pushing his voice so Welker couldn't emote properly with it. By pulling it back in, Megatron isn't permanently shouting—it has more impact when he does shout, and the rest of the time he can be in, as Welker himself put it, "more of an acting place".
      • Part of it is an evolution in the character himself. G1 Megs was an 80s cartoon villain, with all the cartoonish supervllainy you'd expect. He had a perfect voice for yelling Silence, You Fool! at his minions and screaming "Retreat! RETREEEEEEAT!" when the good guys got the upper hand. It translated into mad Galvatron's unhinged rantings nicely (no, epically.) However, 25 years later, Megatron is known as a supreme Badass who can kick more Autobot skidplate singlehandedly than any other ten 'cons put together, and Hugo Weaving and Corey Burton have made him the posterbot for Evil Sounds Deep. Welker's portrayal of Megatron in movie-based games and Prime are recognizable enough that you don't say "why'd they bother getting him back if the voice is totally different?" but fit the Megs of this decade.
    • Starscream's Hungarian voice from the same show changed drastically from the beginning of the series to season 2. At first, he sounded like a somewhat younger and less raspy version of the original (the same as Hungarian Beavis). Now, he talks in a near-constant high-pitched, shrill tone, making him sound exactly like his voice actor's performance as Gollum from The Lord of the Rings.
  • Speaking of Peter Cullen, his interpretation of Eeyore in Winnie the Pooh evolved into a near perfect replica of Ralph Wrights (originally being somewhat breathier and higher pitched). There is in fact a noticable difference in most of the replacement actors since they took over in The New Adventures of Winnie the Pooh.
  • Metalocalypse example: In a Music/Animation crossover, compare the singing on Dethklok's The Deth Album to that on Deth Album II. Brendon Small has gotten more versatile with Nathan's singing voice - it's still 98 percent death grunt, but there are moments of flexibitly.
    • Additionally, Toki's voice appears to have gotten higher and squeakier as the series has gone on.
  • Muffy, from Arthur, is voiced by the same voice actress, unlike most other characters, but her voice has gotten higher throughout the seasons.
  • It happened with Fievel's voice between the first two movies and the television show of the An American Tail series. Fievel's voice actor was getting older.
  • Hank Hill of King of the Hill originally spoke like Tom Anderson, later developing a less gruff voice. Dale Gribble's voice also got higher as he became more of a goof.
    • Also Bobby's voice has become more higher pitched in later years.
    • Bill's voice in the first season was lower and gruffer before developing into a higher dopier voice in the second, and Luanne had a lower huskier voice before developing into the ditzy Valley Girl voice.
  • Many characters of KaBlam! had their voices go lower as the series went on. The Off-Beats, Loopy, Larry, and most recognizable are Henry and June. This was due to them all being played by actual kids at the time. Unlike most examples of shows with kid voice actors, both Henry (Noah Segan) and Larry's (unknown) voice actors were kept even after their voices broke.
    • The Flesh in Action League Now! sounded more heroic in the earlier shorts (though note that a few of them aired Out of Order), including the ones that aired when the short was still on All That
    • Bob's voice was lower in the first few Prometheus and Bob shorts.
  • In the earlier episodes of Rugrats, Tommy's voice sounded a little higher and rougher than what he would sound like later on.
    • When Joe Alaskey first took over the voice of Grandpa Lou after the death of David Doyle, he was very high-pitched, like Daffy Duck on crack. Over the next few years he lowered the pitch to the point where it was a passable imitation.
    • For the first couple episodes David Doyle's Grandpa Lou's voice was gruffer and raspier.
    • Angelica's voice was always Cheryl Chase's own voice tweaked a little bit, but in Seasons 1-6, it was more noticable that it was Cheryl's own speaking voice. In the Kimi era, her voice gets slightly higher. However in the Tales from the Crib DVD movies, her voice noticably reverts back to Cheryl's and sounds noticably more like Cheryl than she did in the show's entire run.
  • In ChalkZone, Rudy's voice was a lot higher in the first two shorts on Oh Yeah! Cartoons (sounding similar to Tommy Pickles, who E.G. Daily was also playing at the time, but slightly lower). When he was aged up from eight to ten in the second season of Oh Yeah! Cartoons (following a request from Nickelodeon to age him up for when the short became a TV show), his voice lowered a bit, but was still higher than his voice in the show itself.
    • Snap's Brooklyn accent got thicker as the show went on; some earlier episodes (especially the original shorts) have a few cases of Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping regarding it.
    • Penny originally had a lisp in some of her earlier appearances in the Oh Yeah! Cartoons shorts, but Hynden Walch dropped it in season one.
  • While this is very subtle, both Noah and Cody from Total Drama Island have deeper voices in the second-season special and the third season than they did in the first season. They've also grown noticeably taller.
    • In the first few episodes Owen sounded like a buff jock character and in Phobia Factor from here on his tone sounds a lot goofier.
    • Just about everyone's voices became higher to some extent.
  • All the preteen characters in Jacob Two-Two suffer from this to some extent or another, but none moreso than Buford. In his first appearance, he sounds younger than ten-year-old Jacob, but this doesn't last long. By the end of the fifth season, his voice has aged so much that the producers pitch it up to make it sound younger, particularly noticable in the episode "Jacob Two-Two and the Too Big Tomatoes."
    • Just the oposite applies to resident janitor Leo Louse's mother, whose voice is provided by the same actor as Leo himself. In her first episode, her voice was pitched up to make it sound more feminine. However, in all subsequent appearances, the processing is left out and the actor applies a high-pitched old woman sound to his own performance.
  • For the American dub of Bob the Builder, Lofty was performed by a female voice actor during the original series. The feminine quality in his voice is more noticeable in earlier episodes such as "Wendy's Busy Day" and "Muck Gets Stuck", although it gradually becomes more masculine in later seasons. (Despite this, he remained a male character in both US and UK dubs.) Starting with the "Project: Build It" era, the character (unlike the rest of the machines) gets a second voice actress (Emma Tate) and starts to sound more childlike. When the series switched to CGI for the third era (Ready, Steady, Build!), Lofty completely loses the feminine quality in his voice, and, while still sounding younger, now sounds more raspy.
    • In the UK, Lofty (played by Neil Morrissey) sounds more like a high-pitched adult compared to the American dub. (However, his voice is a bit deeper the earliest episodes of the first season, noticeably in "Muck Gets Stuck".)
    • Compared to all this information, Lofty's voice is actually more deeper in the Spanish (both Latin American and especially European), Catalan, Cantonese, and Welsh dubs.
    • Like Lofty, Bob has received several voice actors in the American dub. While Neil Morrissey voices him (and Lofty) in the UK dub, Bob's American voice has been provided by William Dufris, Greg Proops, and Marc Silk.
    • In the American dub, most of the characters, aside from Lofty and Bob, receive voice changes starting with the second half of the "Project: Build It" era and then again for the CGI era.
    • Also for the US dub, Spud was originally voiced by Alan Marriott during the original era, but starting with "Project: Build It", his UK voice, provided by Rob Rackstraw (which is a bit deeper, compared to his original American voice) remains unchanged. (In earlier episodes, his UK voice sounded more nasally.)
  • Some of the characters from VeggieTales have come to sound more like each other, most notably Archibald, the tall Scallion, and the "Silly Songs with Larry" narrator. This is eventually lampshaded, when Larry says he always thought Archibald was said narrator (even though they were clearly separate characters from their first appearance).
    • When comparing Larry's voice in earlier episodes to those in his more recent appearances (take "The Water Buffalo Song" versus "Sport Utility Vehicles" he has a much higher-pitched voice and sounds far less dopey than he originally did.
  • Butt-Head's voice from Beavis And Butthead became slightly higher (but still much lower than Beavis' voice) and gained a distinctive lisping accent as the show progressed. The lisp became especially obvious in the movie ("Hey, Beavisth! Thisth sucksth!").
    • In between the end of the show, and when Mike Judge would start breaking them out for special appearances, Beavis' voice has gotten noticeably lower.
    • Before she got her own spin-off, Daria's voice was higher and more expressive in her earlier appearances on Beavis and Butt-head. As the show went on, she started sounding closer to how she does in her own show.
  • In Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Meatwad's voice became lower after a season or two, compared to his squeakier original voice.
  • Frank Welker's performance of Fred Jones from Scooby-Doo became more goofy and comical since the late 90s. And occasionally developed a Minnesotan accent. Also to note, Casey Kasem's Shaggy became slower and rougher as he aged.
  • Compared to his signature voice, Beast Boy of Teen Titans had quite the low voice in the first season. Most likely the lowest of the Titans.
  • Code Lyoko has several drastic examples, and these are just from the people who kept the same voice actor.
    • First, and most unfortunately, is Jeremie, voiced by an adult woman, Sharon Mann. He began with a very high voice at the beginning of Season 1, which gradually deepened over the course of the season and stayed deep through the next. Then, in Season 3, it switched abruptly back to a higher tone, sounding just a twitch deeper and more nasally than early Season 1, which he keeps for the rest of the series.
    • Aelita's voice is lower and matronly near the beginning of the series, but after she leaves the supercomputer, her voice slowly becomes higher-pitched and girlish. Thankfully, she and Jeremie never start sounding like each other.
    • Odd's voice begins somewhat lower and calmer, perhaps trying to emulate the sound of his previous voice actor, but gradually gets higher and screechier until it crystallizes into his iconic tone.
    • Several background characters without many lines early in the series, such as Herb and Mr. Ishiyama (who sound like William in their first appearances) and Mr. Delmas (who is far more nasal in "Teddygozilla"), have voices that sound nothing like those established later on.
    • William's voice gets lower and less shouty during Season 4. This may have been to reflect Clone William's difference in personality, but it's kept for William after he returns.
  • Andy Berman's voice for Dib on Invader Zim tends to go back and forth. Sometimes he has a higher, faster-paced voice as he did on the debut episode; other times, his voice is lower and rougher, and he talks more slowly. The latter voice makes him sound more like a teenager.
  • In Adventure Time, because Finn's voice actor is an adolescent, his voice is already beginning to become noticeably deeper and crackier. As such, they justified this in-universe by having Finn turn 13 in the middle of season two.
    • Jake is also notable. In early episodes, he sounded a lot more like Bender (only not as much of a drunken jerk). In later episodes, Jake still sounds like Bender, only a bit more wackier and more nuanced.
    • Ice King's voice has gotten a bit less raspy and a bit more high-pitched over the years, possibly to reflect him being less of a jerk and more of a pitiful person.
    • After Too Young, and in some parts of You Made Me and beyond, Lemongrab starts to sound a tiny bit effeminate, and sometimes has a very slight British accent for some reason. He sounds a little more eloquent in his later episodes.
    • Cinnamon Bun goes through this in his very first episode.
  • In SilverHawks, main villain Mon*Star originally had a very deep voice, but as the episodes wore on, it got higher and higher, until voice actor Earl Hammond was using the same screechy voice for Mon*Star as he was for Vultureman on sister show ThunderCats. It was particularly jarring during his Transformation Sequence, since it still used the original voice and was never re-recorded.
  • Pretty much all of the voices for Regular Show have become more upbeat since the characters' first appearances in early short films made by the show's creator, J.G. Quintel. Sam Marin (who voices Pops, Benson, and Muscle Man) is noticeably calmer as Pops in the pre-Regular Show short The Naive Man from Lolliland, and as Benson in 2 in the AM PM. The latter also has Quintel using a much quieter tone for Mordecai (although it's still Quintel's natural speaking voice). Quintel, Marin, and William Salyers (Rigby) all kept their noticeably quieter deliveries on the Regular Show pilot, which also had Mark Hamill using a more clipped and gruff delivery for Skips. By the time the show made it to series, everyone's delivery suddenly became a lot more energetic, and Skips' voice became a bit more natural.
  • In the early pilot of what would later become The Problem Solverz, Alfe started out with a normal voice that was only slightly low. In Neon Knome he became a very low Guttural Growler which was lightened up in the The Problem Solverz to reflect his more impetuous personality. Roba's voice was also lower in the first pilot, and since then it's gotten higher with a robotic filter added on. Horace has a different voice actor for the series as well.
  • In Doug, the title character's voice (in the Nickelodeon series, played by Billy West) was much more high pitched and nasal in the pilot, "Doug Can't Dance". Around season four, Doug's voice noticably gets lower and closer to Fry's voice (before Doug crossed over to ABC and West was replaced after wanting nothing to do with the new version of Doug).
    • Patti is a little softer and Skeeter is a little more nasal in the first season.
    • Connie and Patti both sound lower in the Disney episodes.
  • Hey Arnold! has all the kids voiced by real kids that matched the age of the kids on the show. Some got replaced when their voice changed (most noticably Arnold who had five voice actors) but a lot of them also remained, even a huge part of the boys.
    • Gerald's voice changed quite early on, but they used it as a plot point and thus didn't have to be replaced.
    • Helga's voice became much more mature sounding.
    • Phoebe's voice actually became higher as the series progressed. Likely because her voice actress was getting older and had to put more force into her voice to sound like a 9-year-old.
    • Other characters like Harold and Stinky just went through their voice change without any explanation to the viewers.
  • Jimmy's voice for The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius TV series is quite a bit lower and deeper than it was in the movie, probably meant to signify that he had gotten older since the events of the movie. Sheen's voice also changed after the movie.
  • In the internet cartoon of Making Fiends, Charlotte sounded like an actual little girl, and Vendetta had a high, shrill voice with a thicker accent. In the TV cartoon, they have the same voice actors. Charlotte's voice is still high and cheery, but she sounds more like a kindergarten teacher than an 8-10 year old girl, and Vendetta's voice is lower, more guttural and overall less pleasant to the ear (though it never was pleasant). Marvin's voice is actually higher, and more nasal, unlike in the web cartoon where he had a nearly Simpleton Voice. Malachi's voice went from archaic and mature, to whiny and comical.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic: Rarity has seen her vocal quirks (pitch shifting and Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping) becoming more and more prominent as the series has gone on. Pinkie Pie on the other hand has exhibited vastly increased range. Previously limited to her usual excited squeak, she increasingly slips into a much lower, more mature voice when voicing more dramatic scenes. Sweetie Belle has also changed noticeably, losing her slur and becoming much less childish, sounding more and more like the actress who portrays her.
    • Applejack started off with a higher pitched voice similar to Rainbow Dash. Ashleigh Ball, who voices both characters, intentionally lowered Applejack's voice later in the series to differentiate the two and make it easier when Talking To Herself.
    • Fluttershy, mimicking her personality, started off extremely quiet and awkwardly pronouncing and tended to murmur and whisper everything. In later episodes (starting about halfway through the first season), she has a slightly more confident and perkier tone, likely due to Character Development.
    • Sweetie Belle's voice in the Polish dub of Season 2 is a bit more mature when compared with her performance in Season 1. This is due to voice actress hitting puberty.
      • The same thing happened with her English VA as well. Compare her voice in Season 4 to her voice in Season 1. Her days as "Squeaky Belle" are all but over.
    • Apple Bloom's voice became lower and developed a Southern Accent starting in Season 2.
    • Princess Luna's voice has also changed between seasons, even after you take into account the hamminess from "Luna Eclipsed".
    • Diamond Tiara's voice became lower in "Ponyville Confidential", though it went back to the original pitch later.
  • Paul Winchell's Gargamel sounded more like Dick Dastardly early on but started to show some wear as the series went on. Even his Dick Dastardly on Yogi's Treasure Hunt (1985-88) started sounding like late Gargamel.
  • Regina King, the voice of Huey and Riley from The Boondocks, had managed to give both characters more distinctive voices over the three seasons.
  • A more unique case for Thomas the Tank Engine. Michael Angelis originally narrated the show in a faster, more excited tone. As seasons progressed his storytelling style became slower and more mellow sounding. His voices for some of the engines also changed. This is even more noticable due to stories from earlier seasons he has renarrated for audiobooks and other projects later on.
    • For the later CGI episodes, Rupert Degas' voice for Flynn became rather higher and younger sounding within the course of only four appearances.
    • Ben Small's voice for Thomas himself has gradually become more nasal and helium pitched in the UK dub. Meanwhile Keith Wickham emphasized a cockney accent more for James, and less for Percy (likely to differentiate them more).
  • All the kids on Martha Speaks, save Carolina, have definitely changed over the years. Some of them stayed on until they were re-cast due to their voices changing.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball has two examples of vocal evolution brought on by puberty. Logan Grove (Gumball) and Kwesi Boakye (Darwin) were both around 13 when they began voicing their respective characters. Both of them have gotten noticeably deeper in Season 2, especially Logan, whose delivery also got calmer. Interestingly, their voices cracked even in the first episodes, so change was pretty much inevitable. Both have been officially replaced in Season 3.
  • Hamilton Camp's performance as Gizmoduck sounds very different in DuckTales compared to his later guest appearances in Darkwing Duck. It's a lot less booming, and a lot sillier sounding, sounding similar to when Fenton's superhero voice broke character when he got excited on the former show.
  • Superjail! started with Jared sounding less shrill and with a slight lisp. Alice still had a deep voice, but spoke in a more subdued tone. Their voices would gradually evolve over the course of the first season to their current styles.
    • The Twins had slightly higher voices in the pilot, with the normally higher-pitched one sounding more on the nasal side. The higher-pitched Twin tends to have more vocal variation throughout the series, sometimes sounding only slightly softer than the other to having a much squeakier tone.
    • Gary's perverted cellmate initially had a somewhat nasal voice, but it evolved to become higher and more childish to emphasize his creepy nature.
    • Jean started out with a bit of a Southern accent and a raspier voice, while Paul's vocal delivery was less flamboyant in his early appearances.
  • In early episodes of Garfield and Friends where Wade sings, he doesn't "sing" to the music, like in this song note . In later episodes, he sings perfectly, but something interupts him. In one episode of Season 6, he sang perfectly, but off-key to the background music, and in the last episode where he sings (and the only "perfect" one of Wade's songs), a pig who came to see the show's production interrupted him, causing him to groan.
  • In the intro for Pepper Ann, you hear her little sister Moose say in a Bobby Hill-esque voice "Did someone take my lunch?", in the actual show she speaks in a lower huskier voice.
  • In early points of The Dreamstone, Leonard Whiting originally voiced Urpgor in a much more tranquil, gravelly murmur, much expectant from a usual Igor-type. Throughout the first season, he gradually becomes louder, hammier and more flamboyant sounding.
    • Stuart Lock's voice for Rufus also became squeaker pitched and less soft spoken. In contrast Amberley became slightly deeper sounding as Nancy Hendry reached adulthood.
    • John Franklin Robbins's voice for the Dream Maker was also more gruff and relaxed. By the second season he has a more dignified and hammy pronunciation.
  • On Ren & Stimpy "Adult Party Cartoon", John Kricfalusi couldn't figure out how to make Ren's voice sound like it did on The Ren & Stimpy Show. As a result, he just did it without pitch-shifting, thus creating a lower, more gruff voice than before.
    • Incidentally, Billy West's first recording of Ren's voice (for a "Goodbye" bumper) was pitched up, and it sounded very odd. By his first full episode as Ren, it was determined that he could reach the desired pitch naturally. From there, the voice gradually evolved away from Kricfalusi's interpretation, with the accent becoming less pronounced over time.
    • West's voice for Stimpy also started out lower and more deadpan, eventually becoming higher and more excitable sounding.
  • George Jetson on The Jetsons sounded very different in the 1985 revival from the 1960s run, despite being voiced by the same actor George O'Hanlon. This was due to O'Hanlon having suffered a stroke.

Vocal DissonanceVoice Acting TropesVoice Actors
Vacation, Dear BoyCharacters and CastingWritten-In Infirmity
Vacuum MouthAnimation TropesVoices Are Mental

alternative title(s): Vocal Decay
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