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Hiding Behind Religion
Lucideus: Have you been hurting your fellow mortals?
Priest: Oh, certainly not. All that we do is for their own good.
(beat)
Lucideus: Let me ask this way: Are you setting people on fire?
Priest: On fire for God!
Lucideus: I think we need to talk about this.

Religion is often associated with virtue, for various reasons from the incentives the former is often perceived to have for the latter, to simply the belief that virtuous minds accept religion in the first place.

In turn, this also creates an incentive, in a character who wants to be seen as more virtuous than they really are, for hiding behind religion.

Not to be confused with The Fundamentalist, who really DOES believe in said fanatically religious ideas, hiding behind religion implies some level of insincerity. One CAN be both, however; one can be a fundamentalist while not being QUITE as religious as one pretends to be.

Not to be confused with the Sinister Minister either, as one can hide behind religion without being a minister at all, and one can be a Sinister Minister without it being because they are hiding behind religion, such as if said Sinister Minister is a genuine fundamentalist, for instance.

A Sub-Trope of Hypocrite. A religion where this mindset is the norm rather than the exception for many of the clergy is most likely a Corrupt Church. See also Light Is Not Good, which can be this on a more fantastical level.

Sincere members of the religion (or those simply educated in the tenets of other faiths) may invoke the No True Scotsman trope when people like this are mentioned (i.e.: "No true Christian would torture nonbelievers, no true follower of Islam would kill fellow Muslims, etc.).

Note: Who may be considered to be doing this fallacy in Real Life often relies on personal interpretation which can result in heated arguments. As such, No Real Life Examples, Please!

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime and Manga  

  • Father Cornello of Fullmetal Alchemist.
  • In season 2 of A Certain Magical Index, Vento of the Front uses the Catholic Church's warlike policies as an excuse for her vendetta against science due to her brother's death.
  • Caribou from One Piece, is often seen praying to God then having his crew bury people alive.
  • In Berserk, Farnese starts out as a Church Militant who is desperately trying to be The Fundamentalist and convince herself that burning heretics alive is a regrettable but necessary duty. The truth is that she discovered when she was a young child that taking part in burnings gave her relief from the violent outbursts and hopelessness she felt due to her upbringing in a lonely and controlled aristocratic family, and as it was mistaken for religious devotion she was encouraged to take part in more and given a position within the church that let her indulge her desire, so that by the time she's an adult she gets sadistically aroused by burning, screaming and torture. Notably, she is still a sympathetic character, as even before her Heel-Face Turn she was shown to be deeply disturbed by her own nature, and in one memorable scene she finishes pleasuring herself while thinking about burning people and then breaks down crying and trying to tell herself "I am not wrong".
  • Archbishop De Villiers of the Terraist Church in Legend of Galactic Heroes. Even though the Church was a Path of Inspiration, most of its clergy genuinely believed in their tenets of Earth being sacred and were well-known for their asceticism. De Villiers however believed nothing of that and saw the Church as simply a tool to seize power. During one episode, he was shown secretly indulging in hard liquors.

     Comic Books  

  • Cardinal Trebaldi from Le Scorpion. He doesn't even believe in God but plots to become Pope because the Vatican's position will give him a stranglehold on power in Europe.

    Film 

  • Prison warden Samuel Norton from The Shawshank Redemption uses religion as a means to appear virtuous. He turns out to operate various money scams, he gets prisoners to work for him by threatening to "cast them down with the sodomites" otherwise, and he has people murdered merely for wanting to testify on behalf of innocent inmates who Norton wants to keep working at the prison.
  • Most of the characters from the film, Saved!.
  • Judge Claude Frollo from the Disney adaptation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame is initially Holier Than Thou, until his lust for Esmeralda becomes an obsession, and he decides forcing her into a "be mine or you will burn" Scarpia Ultimatum would be worth going to hell over. In public, he still maintains a Knight Templar image, and uses that to try to achieve his goals.
  • The self-help preachy guy from Donnie Darko who turned out to possess child porn.
  • In the Swedish movie Hajen som visste för mycket (The Shark Who Knew Too Much) Joakim Plottner hides one of his Fake triplet brothers as a monk in a deeply religious sect. Everyone else in the sect is there to get an alibi, ignore the worlds problem and hide their heads in sand.
  • After being knighted by the Church In The Godfather Part III, Don Michael gets accused by Kay of being a Villain with Good Publicity who has invoked this trope.
  • Capitalism: A Love Story: In it's critical observation of capitalism, the documentary argues that many crooked businessmen do this, claiming their ill-gotten gains as a gift from God, while many priests argue that capitalism is incompatible with the teachings of Christianity. To drive the point further, clips from Jesusof Nazareth with edited dialogue appear to show what Jesus would be like as a capitalist:
    Rich Man: Master! What must I do to have eternal life?
    Jesus: Go forth and maximize profits.

    Israelite: You say the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand. But when exactly will it be?
    Jesus: When you deregulate the banking industry.

    Man with palsy: Please help me. I've been this way for over 20 years.
    Jesus: I'm sorry. I cannot heal your preexisting condition. He'll have to pay out of pocket.
  • In A Few Good Men, Lieutenant Kendrick claims being Christian in his testimony, but simoultaneously exposes his absolute absence of compassion.

    Literature 
  • Vorbis from Small Gods: justifies himself as doing the will of the Great God Om... but Om knows there's only one person left who even believes he exists, and it's not Vorbis.
    • Vorbis is debatable: he isn't consciously hypocritical. He truly believes, but not in Om.
    • The secondary antagonist of Making Money is a Con Artist who intends to blackmail Lipwig, and assumes the persona of a priest of Om while he's in town. The gods don't take kindly to this and said blackmailer has a pair of springloaded false teeth that don't fit. And the goddess of things-stuck-in-drawers owes Moist from Going Postal...
  • Alec D'Urbervilles is hinted to be this from Tess of the d'Urbervilles.
  • Mr. Brocklehurst from Jane Eyre. He tries to teach his school humility by starving them and providing them with low quality clothing as his daughters and wife stand by wearing silk finery.
  • Machiavelli recommends this in The Prince.
    "Therefore it is unnecessary for a prince to have all the good qualities I have enumerated, but it is very necessary to appear to have them. And I shall dare to say this also, that to have them and always to observe them is injurious, and that to appear to have them is useful; to appear merciful, faithful, humane, religious, upright, and to be so, but with a mind so framed that should you require not to be so, you may be able and know how to change to the opposite.
  • In The Bible, Jesus frequently calls the Pharisees out on this.
  • Safehold's Zhaspahr Clyntahn could be considered a case of this combined with The Fundamentalist. Since he's highly prone to believing his own lies, his Hiding Behind Religion often takes the form of deciding on a response to some threat to his personal power, using whatever logic he needs to use in order to make it appear he's acting in the name of God's Church, and proceeding to genuinely believe whatever logic he's come up with.
  • Isaac of Edenborn is annoyingly pious to his siblings and children. It's all concealing the fact that he's been a burnt atheist since The Reveal of the previous book. In reality, he has converted his apparent religion to a Path of Inspiration and intended to use his children as a form of Human Sacrifice. Whether he would have gone through with it or not is left unanswered.
  • Big Jim from Under the Dome appears to do this. While Pastor Lester Coggins appears to be a sincere example of The Fundamentalist, Renny wears his religious tendencies like a suit of political armor that he can take off or put on depending on the circumstances, going so far as to kill Pastor Coggins when he decides that God probably isn't okay with their helping to run one of New England's largest meth labs.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In the Community episode "Foosball and Nocturnal Vigilantism", Jeff lays this accusation on Shirley after he learns that she was his childhood bully. While the accusation isn't entirely fair — Jeff's clearly overwrought at the time (not entirely without reason) and Shirley is a genuinely religious person — it's also not entirely unjustified either; Shirley does have a tendency to use her religious beliefs as a way of feeling superior to other people, manipulating them to do what she wants through guilt and self-righteousness and avoiding having to self-examine her own faults and less savoury aspects.
  • Uncle Ezra from the Tales from the Crypt episode "A Fitting Punishment" is a cruel and greedy funeral director who hides behind a veneer of piousness for his clients. Most of his bibilical quotes don't even come from The Bible, which gives away that he's a phony, but what really defines his character is crippling and later murdering his orphaned nephew, simply because he didn't want the extra burden.

    Music 
  • The song "Jesus He Knows Me" by Genesis is a Take That to people like this. Specifically, those who use religion for self-enrichment.

    Tabletop Games 
  • For the most part, averted in Warhammer 40K: horrible things done in the name of religion are done in the belief that such things are right (and given the setting, they are). If anyone is committing atrocities Hiding Behind Religion, they're usually secretly dedicated to the Chaos god they really work for, and when the Inquisition finds out...
    • There is the case of the genestealers, however, who infest and subvert as large a part of the population as they can to their cause in preparation for the main tyranid attack, and are often disguised as splinter Imperial cults.

    Theatre 
  • Tartuffe of Moličre's homonymous play is one of the most famous example in francophone country, in which his name is a synonym for that trope; practically equivalent to being a Trope Namer.
  • Generally unsympathetic Mormon closet case Joe Pitt in Angels In America. Specifically, when he tries to draw attention away from his "failings" by putting the blame on his addict agoraphobic wife Harper for not being the ideal Mormon wife (i.e., he would prefer her to be a Stepford Smiler).

     Video Games  

     Web Original 
  • Reverend Noah Howerton from the Honorable Hogwarts forum roleplaying game — an Omnicidal Maniac who is using religion to make his followers help him eliminate all other magic-users so that he's the only wizard left and no others can challenge him. He doesn't really believe in God.

     Western Animation  
  • Reverend Lovejoy from The Simpsons. When the Movementarians gain popular momentum, Lovejoy is so quick to give up on trying to promote Christianity that when Marge shows up at his church, he is soaking it in gasoline, presumably to cash in on insurance fraud. He also seems not to be that good at preaching moral decency to his own family, if his gossipy wife and manipulative daughter are anything to go by, and when the latter reminds him of past misdeeds of her own, he just plugs his ears and pretends not to hear anything. He blames it on years of having to put up with Ned Flanders, which put him off his job more than off his faith and made him, in his own words, "stop caring." His name is also doubly ironic since he's neither particularly loving nor particularly joyful.
    • A recurring theme about Reverend Lovejoy is that he seems to be only in it for the money. This is the reason why Lisa converted to Buddhism.
  • Father Donovan from American Dad! is this in trumps, as in one episode he even complains he still has to work for the church as he can't retire to a full pension yet. Additionally, he openly dislikes religion and God, and is so inappropriate for the job he doesn't ascend to heaven with the people in his church when the rapture happens:
    Francine: What's happening?!
    Donovan: The rapture. Turns out there is a God.
  • Princess Clara from Drawn Together. While not a member of the clergy, she is a religious fundamentalist who uses her beliefs as an excuse to be rotten to everyone. However, the series does prove that she doesn't always follow her beliefs...
  • Just about the entire cast of Moral Orel, who all put up the front of being perfect Christians to hide what horrible and/or broken people they all are. Of course, the only two people who actually seem to truly care about their faith are Orel and Reverend Putty, two of the very few genuinely good people in the show(Although Putty is still sincerely trying to rid himself of old prejudice and bigotry)


The HermitReligion TropesHigh Priest
He Who Fights MonstersAdministrivia/No Real Life Examples, Please!Higher Understanding Through Drugs
Double StandardHypocriteHypocrisy Nod
Heel-Face Revolving DoorImageSource/Western AnimationHigh Voltage Death

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