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Franchise: My Little Pony

"My Little Pony, My Little Pony, what will today's adventure be?
My Little Pony, My Little Pony, will there be exciting sights to see?"
Theme song for the ads and almost all incarnations.

Long-Running multimedia franchise that started humbly with a large horse doll with a brushable tail and mane made of doll hair.

Originally created by Bonnie Zacherle, My Little Pony officially started out as a toyline published and developed by Hasbro in 1982, following their 1981 My Pretty Pony toys. The copyright was finalized in 1983, which is probably why Hasbro counts it as MLP's birthyear and not 1982. The history of My Little Pony is separated into "generations" based on the toyline. It is a history of friendships, of cartoons of varying degrees of sweetness, of little girls achieving their dreams and of grown men defying gender roles.

Generation 1 started humbly with the release of six pony toys in 1982. Very soon, the toyline became a hit of absolutely enormous magnitude, and quickly became a highly recognizable part of pop culture. To this day, even after all the relaunches and re-imaginings of the franchise, the original 1980's toys remain what most people among the general population immediately picture when they hear the phrase "My Little Pony". The toyline was eventually followed by two Television specials, one in 1984 and another in 1985, and a feature-length movie in 1986. A TV series, My Little Pony And Friends, was released later the same year and ran for two seasons before being cancelled in 1987. These cartoons all took place in Dream Valley, part of Ponyland (or Ponyland, part of Dream Valley – no two writers agreed on this point) where the ponies – with the help of a young girl named Megan – often have to fight off some Monster of the Week. Contrary to what one might expect from a work of fiction based on the sugary sweet toys (and contrary to the perceived image of the franchise that the public seems to hold), these cartoons were mostly based around the theme of adventure, and featured some surprisingly dark and lethal villains, especially in the earliest episodes. There were also comics released in the UK that used the same characters but had their own canon. The toys themselves often had short stories pertaining to the ponies in the box.

In 1992 Hasbro released My Little Pony Tales, a Slice of Life series which was set in its own continuity and ran for a single season. Often mistakenly referred to as G2, it's technically still part of G1, even though it has nothing to do with the various Dream Valley/Ponyland cartoons. The show took place in a universe pretty much identical to our own with the obvious exception that everyone is a multicolored pony, and focused on things normal kids deal with. It notably set the trend of having the main setting be a town called Ponyville.

Generation 2 actually began in 1997 when Hasbro gave the toys a major redesign. The toys were now taller, slender, and more "horse-like". The new designs were not well met, and the generation only lasted a year in the US, though it continued for a few more years in Europe. In addition to being the shortest generation, G2 is notably the only one without an Animated Adaptation, though there were comics and a video game.

Hasbro went back to the stockier builds in 2003, marking the beginning of Generation 3. Instead of a TV series, Hasbro opted to release a series of Direct-to-DVD movies & shorts. The setting is once again Ponyville, but this time with a slight fantasy element to it. G3 is known for being the lightest and "pinkest" of the generations. No villains, conflicts are rare, and there's, well, lots of pink, but it had a certain charm to it. Regardless of the quality of the animated adaptions though, G3 proved to be a well needed financial success after the poor reception to G2. In 2007, Hasbro made the controversial decision to reduce the number of characters, in a franchise long known for Loads and Loads of Characters, to seven. This led to a "soft reboot" which retained the original G3 look and was called "Core 7" by fans. Another "soft reboot" a year so so later, which fans call "G3.5", featured the "Core 7" ponies in chibi-forms similar to Ponyville plastic molds. The chibi-fied reboot was not well received, and the cartoons in particular were met with criticism. The era finally came to an end in 2009 after the release of Twinkle Wish Adventure of G3.5, and Once Upon a My Little Pony Time which is linked to the "Newborn Cuties" variant of Core 7. At this point most casual observers had written Ponies off, but it wouldn't be the end of the franchise.

Not by a long shot.

The current incarnation of the franchise, Generation 4, started in 2010 with the release of the TV series My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic developed by Lauren Faust. The ponies are now far more cartoony – large eyes, tiny muzzles, and bodies that are proportionally small for their heads – but generally considered adorable nonetheless. At its core, Friendship is Magic is something of an Adaptation Distillation for the previous cartoons. It has the fantasy & adventure elements of G1, the Slice of Life stories of Tales, and much of the cast are re-imagined G3 ponies. Faust developed a new setting called Equestria, a Fantasy Kitchen Sink with its own growing mythology & history, with the town of Ponyville being the home of the series' mane six heroines. The cartoon became an unexpected hit with a huge Periphery Demographic, but the less said about that, the better. Hasbro seems happy with the success of G4, and is giving Friendship is Magic a growing Expanded Universe with assorted comics and books. See also the G4 page.

    Adaptations 

G1

  • My Little Pony TV Specials: These are a pair of half-hour TV pilots that started it all. Fair warning, they are both Darker and Edgier than one might expect of this subject matter. In one, the ponies face an Evil Overlord who happens to be the trope namer for The Night That Never Ends, and in the other they face a violent drug addicted mage. Yes. Really.
  • My Little Pony The Movie: After the pilots, we have this. In this movie, a trio of semi-competent witches cover all of Ponyland in the Smooze, a living wave of concrete which blankets the lands. Will the ponies be able to stop it? Oh. There's also a subplot about Baby Lickety-Split and Spike being on the run after they ruin a ballet recital.
  • My Little Pony And Friends: This is a direct sequel to the movie. This series featured the ponies going up against more villains and other life-threatening situations.
  • My Little Pony: Two unrelated sets of comics ran throughout G1. They followed their own canon based on the toy line.
  • My Little Pony Tales: My Little Pony meets Slice of Life. Take 1. Different continuity from the previous four.

G2

G3/G3.5

  • My Little Pony G3: Direct-to-DVD movies and shorts. My Little Pony meets Slice of Life. Take 2. Not very well received in general but it has its fans.
  • Once Upon a My Little Pony Time: The two animated shorts starring the Newborn Cuties (in this case, the babyfied version of Core 7 ponies). Wasn't well received.
  • Numerous books seemingly set in a separate continuity from the cartoon.
  • Several comic books based off the toy canon.

G4

See also My Little Phony for parodies and pastiches.

An extensive guide to the toy line and a detailed episode guide for all the pre-G3 series can be found at (naturally) Dream Valley. Etherella's Scrapbook has info on the Ponies, along with info on them in the cartoon and comics.

The My Little Pony franchise provides examples of:

  • Adaptation Expansion: The cartoons and comics.
  • All Girls Like Ponies and Cool Ponies: Well, duh.
  • Alphabetical Theme Naming: The franchise's three (unrelated) named zebras: Zebnote , Zig Zagnote , and Zecoranote .
  • Alternate Animal Affection: Mainly only used in the G1 series and pilot. The ponies would nuzzle and lick each other for comfort, as real horses do, which comes off as a little Les Yay since most medias compare that to romantic kisses.
  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife: Traditionally, the only colors to not be used for ponies (odd variations aside) are black, brown and grey. Friendship is Magic is the first to truly incorporate these colors as well, though somewhat limits it to its male ponies, who aren't nearly as colorful as the females.
  • American Kirby Is Hardcore: Inverted, when you compare the series to those issued by Takara in Japan in the 80s.
  • Animesque The redesign of the G3 series, which some fans disliked initially, since the series seemed like a return to form.
    • The original two specials were this, especially the Catrina one (it showed with the humans, who looked Shōjo (Demographic)), since they were made in Japan.
  • Artifact Title: The title really only makes sense for the toys, given that the ponies in the cartoons are not little, nor do they belong to anyone. There have been some efforts to fix this, however:
    • G1 sometimes has villains use the phrase mockingly, and in some episodes it was implied that 'Little Pony' was their species name.
    • Friendship is Magic occasionally has characters use the phrase as a term of affection.
  • Babysitting Episode: An early episode, The Ice Cream Wars, has a group of ponies babysitting for the First Tooth ponies. They even sing about it!
  • Chest Insignia: The franchise's trademark "cutie marks" are possibly the only example of hip insignia branding.
  • The Dark Age of Animation
  • Depending on the Writer: The UK comics/cardback stories and American cartoon/cardback stories contrasted each other most of the time, and so most personas were very different across the ocean. A noteworthy case was Wind Whistler. In the UK, she's a scatter-brained ditz, in the cartoon she's The Spock and The Stoic.
  • Everything's Better with Princesses: In the eighties, we had the Princess Ponies. There was a grand total of twenty princesses released in the toyline, and that's excluding the queens Majesty and Rosedust. And excluding the many, many, many royal non-pony characters that showed up in the fiction. The early G3 line held off on Princesses for a few years. And then, according to the card backs, it turned out that every Pony is a Princess.
    • For the curious, this was a case of Loophole Abuse. In the ending of The Princess Promenade it is declared in song "We're glad that everyone's a princess. That's you and you, and yes it's true, that you (the viewers) are a princess too!"
    • Something Positive had an interesting take on it...
    • Friendship Is Magic has Princess Celestia, whose title actually understates her role which in practical terms is God-Empress. She was going to be a queen, but Hasbro didn't want that because Disney's use of "queen" has made that title sound evil.
      • The second episode brought us Princess Luna, who shares the same sort of powers and responsibilities as Celestia, and the second season finale gave us Princess Cadance, who... was a bit of a letdown in terms of power in her debut, when compared to the first two. The third season finale gives us Princess Twilight Sparkle.
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows: The Ponies' main weapon is a magical item called the Rainbow of Light. There's also a rainbow connecting Ponyland and Megan's home.
    • The current series has a great visual shout-out to the Rainbow of Light in the pilot, when the Elements of Harmony are activated.
    • Also, Rainbows are actually manufactured in factories in G4 by the Pegasai that control the weather. In addition, Rainbow Dash's mane is rainbow colored, and leaves behind a streak of rainbow light when she travels from place to place.
  • Expy: Characters are often brought over from previous generations (sometimes with slightly changed names), colors are reused often (especially in G2) and Name's the Same is very common.
  • Flat Character: Varying characters to various degrees. The toyline bios don't help, ever since G2 they've been saying less and less about the characters.
  • Generation Xerox: The "Baby" Ponies in general. They share their parents designs, a lot of their personality, and their names.
    • Well, the original Baby Ponies were born from an adult pony's reflection on a magic mirror, therefore the "baby" was just a younger version of the same pony.
  • Heel-Face Turn: Happens with roughly half the villains.
  • Improbably Female Cast: As a brand aimed at girls, there aren't all that many guys around. Only five or so exist in G2, and there is one male pony in all of G3, from 3.5's Twinkle Wish Adventure. G1 has about fifty male ponies (which is nothing compared to the number of female ponies) and quite a large number of non-pony male characters. G4 has at last a larger male-to-female ratio.
  • Manchild: Most of the Ponies are adults, but most act barely more mature than the Fillies.
  • Long Pants: A variation since they hardly wear clothes. They do this trope with hooves, with legs being the same color all the way down to the bottom of their feet. Certain male ponies in Friendship Is Magic are exceptions however.
  • Merchandise-Driven: No. Kidding. The current series tones this down. But from the original series there an episode where Galaxy is dressed in a Cheerleader costume apropos of absolutely nothing at all—except making us aware that there are such costume sets available in the store.
  • The Night That Never Ends: More than once, a villain has had eternal night as the goal. The first TV special, "Escape from Castle Midnight."
  • No Export for You: The biggest case of this is in Japan. Well it was semi-averted in both G1 and G3 (toys only). To put it simply:
    • The G1 Toys by Takara didn't sell as well in Japan unlike their western counterparts and there is a What Could Have Been moment that the baby versions will be released in there, but cancelled.<!— Did Takara also release original G1 ponies in Japan apart from their own variants (Osharena Pony and Kawaii Pony)? —>
    • G3 Suffered from this too. Takara Tomy re-licensed the series in 2006 and released the toys up to the G3.5 line. It didn't sold well either and Takara Tomy decided to pull the plug on the license in 2012 and shut down the official Japanese website for good. The company had enough with low sales and switched their focus to Transformers Prime.
    • The main reason however on ending the franchise in Japan is because it can't keep up with three competing girl-oriented franchises: Pretty Cure, Hello Kitty and surprisingly, Jewelpet (from Takara Tomy's competitor Sega Toys). Even if Friendship is Magic has a decent storyline, characterization and toys that had potential in the Japanese Market, Hasbro and Takara Tomy decided not to release My Little Pony in Japan anymore due to three competing franchises that could crush them.
      • Not to mention that the fanbase of these three in Japan is as solid as iron compared to My Little Pony overall.
      • This was now averted, as of January 23 2013, Bushiroad is finally bringing Friendship Is Magic in Japan after a looong 3-year wait. The best thing about this: the cast from Bushiroad's Tantei Opera Milky Holmes franchise are coming back to voice the main characters! Also counts an example of Marth Debuted in Smash Bros. since this season was the 1st in the franchise to be dubbed in Japanese.
  • No Hugging, No Kissing: In other series than G3 there's the occasional romance, but other than that and one post-wedding kiss in G4 it fits this trope.
  • Off Model: In both the toys (endless regional variations) and the Marvel Animation Studios cartoon (endless animation mistakes; see Drinking Game below). Though to be fair, it occurs in every version of the franchise.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: In-verse Spike finds this out in Spike's Search, where he meets dragons that aren't like him; they're large, green, round, and mean. In the pilot special Tirek had dragons which were different from Spike. In the comics for G1, there were other baby dragons like Spike. Apparently dragons can also be pets in G1, and such as Spike is a pet to Majesty in most medias other than the cartoons. In G3 Spike is over 1000 years old but still looks like a baby.
  • Pegasi
  • Rule of Glamorous
  • Shout-Out: The idea that unicorns can teleport was borrowed from Dungeons & Dragons.
  • Sugar Bowl: The setting could not be more magical and happy — normally. And then the Big Bad of the Week shows up...
  • The Millennium Age of Animation
  • The Renaissance Age of Animation
  • Title Theme Tune: The infamous one, which has undergone endless variations to its lyrics over twenty-five years; plus four other theme songs created for the "Friends" part of My Little Pony 'n Friends (see below).
  • Unicorns
  • What Measure Is a Non-Cute?: Subverted with surprising frequency; dragons, Grundles, Crab Nasties etc.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The 80s cartoons are typically full of Loads and Loads of Characters that change every episode, so this is bound to happen. It's especially bad in the Pilot to the whole franchise; the Ponies in that pilot are never seen again in animation, even the ones that just run around and don't speak.


Mummies Alive!Fantasy Western AnimationMy Little Pony TV Specials
MonopolyCreator/HasbroNERF Brand
Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMHAnimal Title IndexMy Little Pony TV Specials
Muv-LuvFranchise IndexMy Little Pony Generation 4
Mutant LeagueWestern Animation Of The 1990sMy Little Pony Tales
My Life as a Teenage RobotTurnOfTheMillennium/Western AnimationMy Little Pony G3
Mars Attacks!Creator/IDW PublishingMy Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic (IDW)
Little EinsteinsThe Kiddie RideMuppet Babies
My Life MeWestern AnimationMy Little Pony TV Specials
MysceneToysMy Little Pony G3
MonsunoCreator/Shout! FactoryMy Little Pony G3
Muzzy In GondolandThe EightiesMy Little Pony TV Specials
Metal Gear SolidTrope OverdosedMy Little Pony Generation 4

alternative title(s): My Little Pony; My Little Pony
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