Series: Aguila Roja

A Ninja in the Spanish Golden Age? Oh well, why not?

Águila Roja (Red Eagle) is a Spanish live action TV show about a masked hero who fights injustice in Spain, in the 17th Century. Best known for its use of Ninja motifs, the show is (according to an article in the Spanish branch of Wikipedia) the most watched show in Spain's history, and also the most costly, with a budget of almost one million euros per episode.

The series tells the story of Gonzalo de Montalvo, a man who (after being forced into exile to the Far East) learns Ninja-like skills, and then returns to Spain - only to find his wife murdered by a conspiracy known as "La Logia" (The Lodge). Adopting the identity of Águila Roja, he fights the Sheriff Hernán Mejías, and investigates the Lodge's plans with the help of his mentor and father figure Agustín, and his servant and best friend, Sátur, a lovable scoundrel who adds a touch of humor to the otherwise dead-straight show - all while raising his young son, Alonso, who is unaware that his father is a hero. Other main characters include Hernán's Love Interest, Marchioness Lucrecia, and her young son Nuño; Gonzalo's sister-in-law, Margarita; Gonzalo's friends Cipri, Catalina, Inés and Floro; Alonso's friends Gabi and Murillo; the doctor, Juan; Cardinal Mendoza and his niece Irene; and the King of Spain.

It is eventually revealed that La Logia wants to kill The King, that Hernán is actually Gonzalo's brother, and that the King himself is their father. Later on we learn that Irene is Gonzalo and Hernán's sister and that Agustín saved Gonzalo, Hernán and their mother -who turns out to be alive- from Cardinal Mendoza as he wanted Agustín to kill them all.

The series has aired seven seasons so far and a movie adaptation that first aired in April 2011. However, since the show was produced by the public TV channel Radio Televisión Española, it felt victim of the severe budget cuts by Mariano Rajoy's government in early 2012, and was on hiatus until May, 2013, when its 5th season began.

Tropes in Aguila Roja:

  • Adipose Rex: King Philip IV of Spain is pretty stout.
  • Adult Fear: The episode in which Alonso is buried alive is shockingly effective, and so are many other episodes that are particularly distressing.
  • Affably Evil: Cardinal Mendoza is pretty suave even under extreme conditions, though some of them can turn him certainly a bit louder.
  • An Arm and a Leg: Águila's katana cuts limbs like a hot knife through butter. It would be Truth in Television if he used correctly the weapon.
  • All Men Are Perverts: Many times, given it's a Spanish production.
  • All Monks Know Kung-Fu: Agustín fits, presumably because he trained in Asia like Gonzalo. Also, one episode features some infanticide monks who fight with Daggers Akimbo.
  • Amicable Exes: Gonzalo and Margarita, Hernán and Lucrecia, Gonzalo and Lucrecia and Sátur and Estuarda (well, this not so much).
  • Anachronism Stew: The most common criticism about the show.
    • One of the sound effects for the muskets appears to be the same sound effect for the Sniper Rifle on Halo.
    • An episode shows a doctor working for Hernán using what appears to be a 21st century intravenous needle to administrate some Truth Serums to Gonzalo.
  • Anti-Villain: Hernán and Lucrecia.
  • Anyone Can Die: The number of people killed off in the series is surprisingly high and includes several children, not to count the sheer amount of mooks who are rutinely dispatched by Águila.
  • Arch-Enemy: Hernán is this for Águila Roja until he finds out that Hernán is his brother in the Season 1 finale. They are still pretty much enemies in the next seasons but after The Reveal, Águila Roja starts to care for him and will go to any length to save his life.
  • Armoured Closet Gay: The High Inquisitor, who is portraited as conservative as an inquisitor can be, is implied to be homosexual when Hernán and Lucrecia discover a hostler "suspiciously" visiting him in his bed and doing something off-screen which makes Lucrecia blush.
  • Aristocrats Are Evil: Many times, to the extent that Juan is the only unambiguous exception.
  • Artistic License – Astronomy: Two nights before a solar eclipse there's a full moon. Even Satur says "it's almost full moon", implying it has something to do with the approaching eclipse, which does not: there should be a new moon in the sky.
  • Artistic License – Geography: The city in which the series takes place seems to be placed near Madrid (or, in other interpretations, to be Madrid), but the characters can travel to remote regions of Spain in one day or less.
  • Artistic License – Martial Arts: Gonzalo's swordmanship is peculiar to say the least. He sometimes wields his katana more like a machete with too much Weapon Twirling, so it's really suprising whenever he pulls an actual kenjutsu stance.
  • A Taste of the Lash: Cardinal Mendoza of all people is shown self-flagelating after ordering the Sucessor to be killed. It's truly an interesting moment because he had never been shown to give a crap about religion itself aside from his aspirations to be Pope.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: Hernán and Lucrecia get these kind of moments from time to time. How much time is a matter of every season.
  • Ax-Crazy: Hernán has his moments pre-Character Development. Some other Monster of the Week characters qualify, however.
  • Badass Bystander: In the season 6 finale, a group of architects of all people wielding improvised weapons put a stunningly tough fight against Águila when he storms their camp to find out their plans. The fact is more astounding when you remember how easily he routinely kills royal guards and all kinds of dangerous fighters.
  • Badass Normal: Gonzalo has no superpowers to speak of, although his frequent Bullet Time certainly gives the impression.
  • Badass Teacher: Gonzalo.
  • Bad Habits: Mateo, from the movie. He spends most of the film pretending to be a priest, but he is actually a baker who slept with the major of his village and was forced to fly away wearing an old cassock he found in a church.
  • Back from the Dead: Laura, Gonzalo and Hernán's mother, though she is killed shortly after.
  • Big Bad: Cardinal Mendoza, mostly, although the role has been diffuse throughout the seasons.
  • Big Brother Instinct: As shown in the flashbacks, Hernán was very protective of Gonzalo as kids.
  • Big Screwed-Up Family: Gonzalo and Hernán's family.
  • Blow Gun: Eva's Moor bodyguard uses one. It's powerful enough to punch through Gonzalo's Plot Armor.
  • Book Worm: As a teacher, Gonzalo is incredibly knowledgeable and book smart. Agustín also fits the trope.
  • Break the Haughty: Lucrecia. So much. Also, to a lesser degree, Hernán.
  • Brother-Sister Incest: Hernán and Irene, although it bizarrely looks like the producers forgot about it seasons ago.
  • The Brute: Hernán's jailer, although he is less active than most examples, as he rarely leaves the prison.
  • Bumbling Sidekick: Sátur is this to Gonzalo/Águila Roja.
  • Buried Alive: Alonso gets buried alive twice in the series.
  • Calling Card: A red feather that Águila leaves at the scene of his attacks.
  • Cain and Abel: Hernán and Gonzalo.
  • The Cameo:
    • Motorbike racer Jorge Lorenzo appears in one episode as a famous donkey racer.
    • Actor and comedian Edu Soto, known for his character El Neng, appears for two episodes as the King's deranged cousin.
  • Cannon Fodder: Hernán's guard must have reserves, as at least five of them are killed by Águila in every chapter.
  • The Caretaker: Agustín, towards Gonzalo and Hernán.
  • Chain Pain: In one episode Águila uses a chain as an improvised weapon, showing some solid kusari-fundo-jutsu skills in the process.
  • Character Development: Happens to most of the main characters over the course of the series, mostly from late Season 2-Season 3 onwards.
  • Characterization Marches On: In the Pilot, Sátur is introduced as a very physically gifted guy, escaping with ease from several tavernmen and showing an agility level which evenly matches Gonzalo's. This skill is swiftly forgotten for the rest of the series, leaving him as an extremely Bumbling Sidekick who constantly trips over his own feet.
  • Chaste Hero: Gonzalo is thoroughly uninterested in sex, so much that his brief romance with Eva leaves Sátur bewildered (and overjoyed). Evidently, Margarita is Gonzalo's only exception.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: Gonzalo, naturally.
  • Clark Kenting: In contrast with Águila's elaborate costume, Sátur "disguises" himself with a simple hood that clearly reveals his face. Wisely, he never exposes himself when they go out.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Many times. Characters actually *die* from it.
  • Coincidence Magnet: Many characters are this, especially Sátur. Tons of coincidences happen throughout the series, both positive and negative, to the extent it seems to have become a Running Gag.
  • Cool Old Guy: Santiago Merino, in no small part for being played by Enrique San Francisco.
  • Combat Parkour: Used by Águila several times. Even Sátur, as mentioned above, shows some in the Pilot.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Hernán and, surprisingly, Gonzalo and Sátur.
  • The Conspiracy: The Lodge.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Many contrived coincidences happen over the course of the show.
  • Corrupt Church: Again, it's a post-Transition Spanish series, so nobody should expect the Church to be portraited positively.
    • The Lodge includes high ranking priests.
    • The Cardinal Mendoza and his collaborators are the main representants of the trope.
    • The High Inquisitor is probably the worst example. It's mentioned that he merrily ordered to arrest a boy and castrate him for kissing his girlfriend on the street.
    • Father Adrián is the only exception... apparently.
  • Crapsack World: In the series's setting, if a character has no name, he is a raging Jerkass and probably a criminal.
  • Cossacks: The movie features a Cossack assassin who proves to be a tough opponent for Águila. Oddly enough, although he is on-screen referred as a Cossack, he looks more like a Mongol.
  • The Cynic: Cipri, and he really has reasons.
  • Damsel in Distress: Margarita, Lucrecia, Alonso and Nuño often fill this role, which results in Gonzalo and Hernán having to rescue them every time they get in trouble.
  • Dark Action Girl: Sung-Yi.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Many characters that appear on this show suffer from this, and among the main ones, Gonzalo, Hernán, Sátur and Lucrecia all have very tragic pasts.
  • Dark Is Evil: The Sheriff always dresses in black. Justified, as it appears to be his guard's uniform.
  • Darker and Edgier: The show was already quite dramatic in the first season, but things just go downhill in later seasons.
  • Death by Origin Story: Gonzalo's wife dies in the Pilot. This is Gonzalo's main motivation to become Águila Roja and is what starts the plot of the show.
  • Death Is Dramatic
  • Depraved Dwarf: The midget jester from Season 6 averts this, being just a relatively annoying character. Then played straight when he turns to be a spy for the King in charge to abduct Lucrecia's son and presumably have him killed.
  • Deus Angst Machina: All the main characters are this to some extent, but especially Cipri and Lucrecia.
  • Devoted to You: Sátur, towards Gonzalo. Hernán towards Lucrecia.
  • Dodge the Bullet: Constantly, and sometimes even with Matrix-esque effects.
  • The Dragon: Pedro towards Hernán.
  • Driven to Suicide: An incredibly high number of characters have either attempted or committed suicide at some point in the series, including nearly all the main characters: Gonzalo, Hernán, Lucrecia, Irene, Gabi, Nuño, Cipri, Juan, Sátur, Margarita, etc. Some of them have attempted more than once. In Lucrecia's case, it's more like 4-5 further attempts at least by the seventh season.
  • Dysfunction Junction: If you want to cry a lot, don't look any further, this is the show you're looking for.
  • Elite Mooks: The French troopers from the film. They wear black armors and wield hand crossbows, and are clearly better trained than most of the mooks in the series.
  • Enfant Terrible: Blanca, Lucrecia's psychopathic goddaughter. Even the marchioness lampshades it when she wonders how a ten year old can have such a penchant for killing.
  • Everyone Calls Him Barkeep: Hernán is much better known as simply The Sheriff. His liutenant Pedro is a worse example, as his name is very, very rarely said despite being a relatively important character (heck, he has a name, never gets killed, is always behind Hernán on screen and sometimes sleeps with Lucrecia).
  • Everythings Better With Ninjas: The show can be described as Alatriste if he was a ninja.
  • Evil Brit: The captain Patrick Walcott.
  • Evil Counterpart: Sung-Yi to Gonzalo, though she is more ammoral than evil.
  • Evil Twin: Sátur gets one. We are never told his name.
  • Expy: Eva de Almeida certainly echoes Irene Adler.
  • Eye Scream: The bald jailer loses an eye in the first season to a dagger attack by Águila. Later, Lucrecia suffers the same fate to a falcon.
  • Fanservice Extra: A lot in each episode.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: Hernán's signature eskrima jacket.
  • Femme Fatale: Eva, although surprisingly well dissembled.
  • Flanderization: For several seasons, Alonso did not have more personality than his tendency to blame his father for everything and childishly rant against him at every opportunity. In the fifth season he had some character development, but recently he has fallen again on the trend.
  • Giant Mook: Hernán's jailer. He is bald, hunchbacked and (later) one-eyed, but above all he is a really big guy.
  • Graying Morality: The show starts out as a stereotypical Black and White Morality story, but in later seasons it becomes more of a Gray and Gray Morality one.
  • Green-Eyed Monster: Happens so often with regard to Hernán and Lucrecia's relationship that it's almost become a Running Gag.
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: Played to a ridiculous degree with the Santillana palace, to the point that you have to wonder if they really have guards in the first place. Beggars, killers, madmen and even a loud-mouthed British platoon can sneak into the palace without being noticed.
  • Heartbroken Badass: Gonzalo, in the first season.
  • The Hero: Gonzalo/Águila Roja, who is The Protagonist while Hernán is Gonzalo's Deuteragonist and Villain Protagonist.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Gonzalo and Sátur.
    Sátur: “Master, you're the best thing that's ever happened to me. And no matter what happens, that's never going to change.”
  • Hidden Depths: Hernán and Sátur start out as the classic Arch-Enemy and Plucky Comic Relief of the series respectively, but throughout the series they both prove to be very complex and well-rounded characters who have an Undying Loyalty towards their loved ones.
  • Interchangeable Asian Cultures: Big time. On one hand, Gonzalo always mentions China as its place of training, and Sung-Yi is obviously Chinese for her fisonomy and accent. On the other hand, Gonzalo is a ninja and she is a kunoichi, they speak Japanese during their reencounter, and a flashback shows them training under a Japanese martial arts master. It's implied that they trained in both lands, but even so, the matter is frankly confusing.
  • Invincible Hero: Gonzalo evolves into this after several seasons, to the extent the show seems to have quit trying to bring antagonists who can pose a threat to Águila.
  • Hero Killer: To date, Sung-Yi is the only antagonist who is solidly portraited as more badass than him. She actually almost kills him in the first duel.
  • Historical Fiction: With the Historical part being quite low, but still.
  • Hunting the Most Dangerous Game: Alonso finds himself as prey when he accepts a shady proposal from a group of aristocrats.
  • I Am A Humanitarian: The "giant" in the forest.
  • I Know Karate: Gonzalo's fighting style is rather indefinite, although it is clearly Asian and includes moves from karate, jujutsu, kung fu and silat.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: Many, but specially the Sheriff's soldiers. They usually miss their shots, and whenever they don't miss, Águila dodges them.
  • Infant Immortality: The show always had been quite laidback towards this restriction, openly showing child characters being killed here and there, but an episode from the seventh season averted it in a HORRIFYING way.
  • In the Back: Sátur gets a memorable one when Gonzalo takes down a bunch of mooks and another one attempts inadvertently to backstab him, only to Sátur to jump into the mook's back and knock him out with a stone.
  • I Owe You My Life: The reason Gonzalo tries to rescue pirate Richard Blake.
  • It's All About Me: Lucrecia tends to think this way.
  • It's All My Fault: Sátur and Alonso tend to think this way whenever something bad happens and they think they could have prevented it or done something about it.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Hernán and Lucrecia have their moments.
  • Just in Time: Águila Roja tends to save the day with seconds to spare.
  • Katanas Are Just Better: Even whenever you use them as a machete.
  • Killed Off for Real: Many characters have been Killed Off for Real. Among the main characters, excluding Cristina who died in the Pilot, Floro, Agustín, Inés and Laura all have been killed off.
  • Knight of Cerebus: The series is pretty dark from its very starting, but the fake Águila Roja turns it Up to Eleven.
  • Kung-Fu Proof Mook: Eva's cloaked mook, who seemed to know karate and Gun Fu. Amazingly enough, he would have stuck a bullet in Gonzalo's head if his gun had not jammed while he had him in point blank.
  • Like an Old Married Couple: Gonzalo and Sátur.
  • Like You Were Dying: Before departing, Santiago reveals that he was actually near dying and that he wanted to see his friend Sátur one last time for that reason.
  • Lonely Rich Kid: Nuño.
  • Love Dodecahedron: There are a LOT of love triangles in this show.
  • Love Hurts
  • Love Makes You Crazy: When it comes to Hernán and Lucrecia's relationship, this is quite an understatement.
  • Loves My Alter Ego: Margarita develops feelings for Águila Roja, albeit briefly.
  • Made a Slave: Happens to Margarita in episodes 2x03 and 2x04, when she is abducted by Barbary Pirates... near Madrid (It Makes Sense in Context). The plotline comes complete with:
  • Man Hug: Many times between Gonzalo and Sátur.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Cardinal Mendoza, Hernán, Lucrecia... Even the King.
  • Marital Rape License: Happened to Lucrecia in one episode from Season 2.
  • McNinja: Gonzalo is Spanish and Sung-Yi is Chinese, but nobody cares.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Marchioness Lucrecia, and in later seasons, Irene too.
  • Mix-and-Match Weapon: Hernán's gun-sword (They really existed).
  • Mook Liutentant: Pedro, Hernán's second-in-command, is the only named and consistently surviving of his mooks.
  • Moral Dilemma
  • The Movie: Involves an adventure in three European countries.
  • Murder Is the Best Solution: Hernán and Lucrecia resort to murder in many occasions.
  • My Country, Right or Wrong
  • Near-Rape Experience
  • Never Trust a Trailer: The next episode previews typically show the events the most dramatic way possible to build tension, which sometimes leads to a wrong impression about them. The most common flavour is making the crowd believe a random character will die, something which rarely happens (but it certainly can happen from time to time).
    • In season 6, a preview shows a chain of deaths as part of a curse or an epidemic, even including sinister lines about that Death has come over them and the like. Truth is that the episode does feature several enigmatic deaths, but they are completely unrelated and the curse theme is never used or mentioned.
  • Nice Guy: Most notably, Cipri, but other characters qualify as well.
  • Non-Serial Movie: The movie is a subversion, as it is canonically placed in the series's timeline and its events are later brought again.
  • The Obi-Wan: Agustín. It helps that the actor who played him, Adolfo Fernández, looks very much like Alec Guiness.
  • Old Master: Agustín.
  • Orphanage of Fear
  • Overprotective Dad: Gonzalo to Alonso, but given their situation, it's to be expected. Also, Agustín and Hernán towards Gonzalo and Nuño respectively, although they're not their real fathers.
    • In later seasons, it is revealed that Hernán is actually Nuño's father.
    • Sátur is quite overprotective towards his son Gabi as well.
  • Parental Abandonment: Most characters suffer from this.
  • Parental Substitute: Agustín is this to Gonzalo, and to some degree, to Hernán as well. There's also Hernán towards Nuño, until it's revealed that he's actually Nuño's biological father.
  • Plot Hole: It's never revealed who helped Sátur to escape from the Memento Mori cave, and given that the storyline seems to close many episodes ago, the question remains unanswered. Actually, it's somehow implied that it was Father Adrián, but the circunstances behind it are unknown.
  • Plot-Powered Stamina
  • Plucky Comic Relief: Sátur.
  • Politically Correct History: The show intentionally averted this trope.
  • Protagonist-Centered Morality: Mostly for Alonso in his relationship with Nuño.
  • Puppy Love: Alonso and Matilde, though it does not last very much.
  • Put on a Bus: In the fifth season, Lucrecia, Mariana and Juan are all Put on a Bus. In Lucrecia's case, The Bus Came Back.
  • Rape as Drama
  • Really Gets Around: Lucrecia is the queen of the trope. Only on-screen she sleeps with more or less every non-plebeian character with a name, including Hernán, Gonzalo, the King, the Cardinal Mendoza and Pedro, along with several unnamed noblemen.
  • Really Royalty Reveal
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Many characters give this speech to one another throughout the series.
  • Retired Badass: Santiago Merino states to be a former law agent.
  • The Reveal
  • Rule of Cool: The show lives on it.
  • Running Gag: Sátur complaining about his lack of an elaborated costume like Gonzalo.
  • Samus is a Girl: The Oriental Warrior is a woman, and her name is Sung-Yi.
  • Save the Villain: This show has an interesting and rare case, as Águila Roja always saves and protects the Sheriff. Justified in that Hernán is actually his brother, so Gonzalo refuses to kill him or let him die.
  • Secret Relationship: Cipri and Catalina's relationship, mainly due to Catalina being married.
  • Scary Black Man: The coast pirate band feature a big black guy who fights with a giant axe and tends to blindly charge towards his opponent.
  • Shaggy Search Technique: The productors love to use this trope, especially with Sátur.
  • Shout-Out:
    • To Franchise/Assassinscreed, obviously.
    • To El Zorro and Batman.
    • One to the famous Arab swordsman scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark happens near the end of "Buscando a Margarita". Águila Roja finds himself alone, face to face against the chief Algerian slave trader on a rowboat. The slaver pulls a dagger and makes many showy movements while smugly smiling at him. Águila Roja then pulls his own throwing knife and stabs him in the heart.
  • Single-Stroke Battle: The first duel between Águila and the Oriental Warrior ends like this, and surprisingly, is Águila who falls.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: Santiago, a trait inherited from the guy who plays it.
  • Spoiled Brat: Nuño starts as one, but he (mostly) grows out of it.
  • The Stoic: Hernán, Lucrecia, Cardinal Mendoza, the King, and to some extent, Gonzalo as well.
  • Sugar and Ice Personality: Hernán. He is cold and cruel to people in general but shows an immense affection towards Lucrecia and Nuño.
  • Stripperific: Lucrecia's dresses.
  • Swashbuckler: Missing the fun side for the most part, given the fact that the series fuels greatly in drama, but otherwise fits the genre.
  • Technical Pacifist: Gonzalo teaches against violence, but Águila Roja will certainly maim and kill to stop the evildoers.
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: From time to time, and yes, always works. In the film, Gonzalo even makes it work with his crossbow.
  • Took a Level in Jerkass: After Hernán's demotion from Sheriff, his lieutenant Pedro doesn't hesitate a single second to take the opportunity and verbally spit Hernán in the face next time he sees him. Granted, the old guy was not the kindest boss ever and his style of law enforcement was clearly irregular, but until that point Pedro had been shown to be very loyal to Hernán and receive a (relatively) good treatment back from him, and the lieutenant himself is shown to be just as disdainful towards the commoners as the former Sheriff. His refusal to support Hernán in the slightest comes as quite shocking.
  • Training from Hell: Gonzalo is known to have passed one in China and Japan.
  • True Companions: Gonzalo, Sátur, Alonso, Margarita, Cipri and Catalina are all like a Big Screwed-Up Family, mainly from Season 2 onwards.
    • Hernán, Lucrecia and Nuño fit the trope as well for the most part.
  • Trying Not to Cry: Lucrecia (unsuccessfully) does this often.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: Cipri and Inés.
  • Undying Loyalty: Sátur towards Gonzalo, so much. Also, Hernán towards Lucrecia.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Hernán, when it comes to Águila Roja. Hernán will still try to kill him no matter how many times Águila Roja saves him.
  • Unknown Character: The Japanese master who trained Gonzalo and Sung-Yi only appears and a flashback and it's never mentioned again.
  • Unnecessary Combat Roll: Backflips and somersaults to jump off a second floor.
  • The Unreveal: The fake Águila's identity and face are left unrevealed at the end of the episode, as it would be pointless, given that they know he was simply some unknown madman.
  • The Vamp: Lucrecia.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: Granted, nobody sane would call Águila Roja a "saccharine show", but the Fake Águila basically makes all the villains until the moment look like charity sisters.
  • Villainous Breakdown: Has happened to Lucrecia at least once every season. Hernán suffers this quite a few times throughout the series too, especially in the last two episodes of Season 4. The seventh season is even worse for him.
  • Wilhelm Scream: At least once every episode.
  • Will They or Won't They?: Gonzalo and Margarita, and Hernán and Lucrecia, have been in this dynamic for seven seasons straight.
  • Wolverine Claws: In season 7, Hernán gains a gauntlet with spiky metal fingers to replace his lost fingertips. Also, back to the first season, Lucrecia's murderous brother used bracelets with long blades attached.
  • The Worf Effect: If a character survives a fight against Águila, he will probably kick his ass later, although he invariably will be defeated at the end.
    • The only example who is never defeated by Gonzalo is Sung-Yi, who is shot dead by Hernán during their rematch.
  • You Are Better Than You Think You Are: Gonzalo usually tells this to Sátur whenever he speaks badly of himself, which happens often due to Sátur's self-esteem issues.
  • You Have Failed Me: Hernán and the cardinal Mendoza are prone to this with their mooks.
  • Young Future Famous People: Implied at least - One of Gonzalo's pupils is a kid with a talent for drawing, whose name is Murillo.
  • Your Cheating Heart: Hernán sleeps with Lucrecia several times over the seasons despite being married to Irene since the end of the second season. Irene, in turn, has cheated on Hernán with Nuño, who is Hernán's son.

Alternative Title(s):

Red Eagle