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Road Runner vs. Coyote
Hmmm-hmmm, it's time for me to eat.
Catching a pig is quite a feat!
The Big Bad Wolf, Richard Scarry's version of The Three Little Pigs

A plot where the antagonist tries several times to capture, kill, or otherwise defeat the protagonist, and keeps failing spectacularly, either because the target is too smart, or because the antagonist is just really unlucky. Often this plot will climax with a plan that looks actually serious, but will fail just as surely as the others.

A Sub-Trope of Failure Is the Only Option, except this specifically focuses on repeated failures in succession. Frequently linked to Harmless Villain, and may induce Rooting for the Empire if the antagonist is pathetic enough.

Compare Catch That Pigeon, Stern Chase, Villain Decay (just here the villain decays immediately by design).

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Pokémon
    • Team Rocket. They must capture that Pikachu!
    • Team Galactic in "Diamond/Pearl". They do succeed in capturing some NPC's pokémon, for the most part the presumably stolen pokémon they use are pathetic, non-evolved species like Wurmple or Bidoof. Just to note, ALL evil organizations in the entire Pokémon universe use pathetic, non-evolved species.
  • Nadie and Ellis in El Cazador de la Bruja are constantly on the run, having to evade various traps laid by Rosenberg and the Witch Coven and bounty hunters, sent by the same people.
  • Lupin III will never be captured by Inspector Zenigata. Well... at least not unless Lupin is trying to mess with Zenigata's mind. Zenigata admits that he wouldn't know what to do if Lupin was actually caught permanently.

Comic Books
  • The Dutch comic De Generaal, and the lesser-known ˇViva Zapapa!, both by Peter de Smet, are filled to the brim with this trope. The main character, The General, assisted by a zany professor and a soldier, and armed with a rather ancient tank, repeatedly tries to take power from The Marshall (seated in a fort; the general's HQ is a preciously guarded tree). Their lack of success in whatever way they try is only surpassed by a motorcycle policeman's failures to book The General for breaking just about any law or rule the policeman thinks applicable.
  • ˇViva Zapapa! takes the same basic idea, but instead of the complexity of the plans themselves, it's usually the bumbling assistant to The Great Revolutionary Leader Zapapa who manages to scupper those plans (if they had any chance of success in the first place).
  • Ghost Rider vs Water Wizard worked like this, mainly due to Ghost Rider being seemingly unstoppable. Water Wizard eventually made a deal with the devil, specifically the Evil Sorcerer Moon Dark, and looked like he would finally be able to defeat Ghost Rider, but did not.

Eastern European Animation
  • Nu, Pogodi! is the Russian answer to Road Runner and Coyote.

Fan Fic

Film
  • The middle of the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang movie where the Vulgarian spies are attempting to capture the car.
  • The old, old movie The Great Race was live-action Road Runner cartoon from start to finish. It was itself an inspiration for Wacky Races.
  • In Caddyshack, Bill Murray's Carl tries increasingly drastic plans to get a certain gopher.
  • The full premise of MouseHunt.
  • Of Unknown Origin plays this trope for horror. Bart Hughes gradually undergoes a mental breakdown as he is repeatedly thwarted in his attempts to kill the rat that lives in his new house.
  • The Villain is a Western example wherein the titular bank robber is trying to capture The Handsome Stranger (no really, that's his name) and Charmin'. Every scheme is right out of a Roadrunner cartoon, including painting a tunnel on the side of a rock and getting stuck in his own glue trap.
  • A Fish Called Wanda has Michael Palin trying to kill an old woman before she can testify about his boss. Each attempt succeeds in killing, not her, but one of her dogs. Palin's character is an animal lover, and this impacts him greatly until, with the killing of the third and last dog, the old woman has a heart attack and snuffs it.

Franchise
  • The Smurfs: In all incarnations of The Smurfs, Gargamel an impoverished evil sorcerer plots to catch the Smurfs so he could create gold, eat them or use them for magic potions. His cat Azrael tries to help him, too.

Live-Action TV
  • The Stargate SG-1 episode "Bounty" was about a bunch of bounty hunters going after the Stargate team, and all but one of them fails spectacularly and hilariously.
  • Farscape: In "Revenging Angel", the protagonist's hallucination was a direct Homage to the Chuck Jones cartoon.

Machinima

Webcomics

Web Original
  • The climactic chase between Roy and Simon in Return of the Cartoon Man is an homage to this type of cartoon, and uses many of the requisite gags.
  • Happy Tree Friends: Sniffles, while normally a hero, has these moments when trying to eat The Ants. But every time this happens, The Ants end up killing him in ways that are sadistic even for the show itself.

Western Animation
  • Looney Tunes' cartoons have been doing it for years.
  • Some Classic Disney Shorts, particularly the ones involving Donald Duck of Donald Duck used this trope, but not quite to the degree of the Warner shorts.
  • Tom and Jerry: Tom the tom-cat and Jerry the mouse are a classic example, but these cartoons belong among the rare ones which sometimes Played With this trope. Jerry was very antagonistic in some cartoons to the point where Tom was the likeable character of the two and viewers rooted for him, hoping he would catch the bloody vermin. In some episodes, Tom had at least some vindication by the end, such as the episode in which he forced Jerry to learn how to "hunt cats" from his nephew. Sometimes Tom and Jerry even collaborated against a common enemy, like a new evil tom-cat in their house.
  • Some of Tex Avery's MGM shorts:
  • DePatie-Freleng Enterprises' had The Ant and the Aardvark series.
  • Columbia Cartoons-Screen Gems' The Fox and the Crow shorts of the '40s often have a variation of this dynamics.
  • Dexter's Laboratory:
    • An episode in which Dexter got a bicycle turned into a direct homage to the Road Runner cartoons. Dexter tried to get even with a roller-blading Dee-Dee.
    • Episode "Mom and Jerry" was a Tom and Jerry pastiche in which Dexter got trapped in the body of a mouse and his mom mistook him for a regular mouse. Hilarity Ensues.
  • The Superman: The Animated Series episode where Mxyzptlk first appeared.
  • Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines: "Stop that pigeon!"
  • Wacky Races: Dick Dastardly's plans to stop the other which often use the same visual gags as the Road Runner cartoons. One of the writers for both shows was Michael Maltese, who had collaborated with Chuck Jones on the Road Runner shorts.
  • Scooby-Doo! and the Reluctant Werewolf: Just think of Wacky Races, only with Scooby-Doo and monsters, and the role of Dick Dastardly (basically the Coyote) replaced alternately by Count Dracula and the Hunch Bunch. Except their main target is only Shaggy's car, in hopes he loses the race so he will remain a werewolf forever.
  • The Fairly Oddparents homaged the Road Runner cartoons in "Back to Norm" where Crocker, in possession of a genie, wishes for elaborate traps to capture Timmy Turner, rather than wishing him to Mars.
  • An episode of Johnny Test parodied this concept including Johnny going "beet beet" in the same style as the Roadrunner's trademark "beep beep" sound and Bling Bling Boy questioningly the sheer improbability of a train passing through a fake tunnel AND an anvil falling randomly from the sky. Oh, and Johnny and Bling Bling even had their "Latin" names.
  • The Donkey Kong segments of the Saturday Supercade. Mario was the Coyote, and DK was the Roadrunner.
  • Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog is perceived as this with Sonic and Tails playing the Road Runner while Scratch, Grounder and Dr. Robotnik (whom we call Dr. Eggman these days) usually played the Coyote. In the ending credits, Robotnik tries to smash Sonic in a trap in a road. When Sonic came, Robotnik pushed the button and seemed to have caught Sonic. However, when Robotnik went to check, he found no sign of Sonic whatsoever. While he left the remote control unguarded and stood at the trap area, Sonic appeared and pushed the button, smashing Robotnik. Sonic then left, dropping the remote control at the trap area. When Robotnik, in a pancake shape as a result of the smashing landed, he hit the button, causing the trap to smash him again.
  • Phineas and Ferb:
    • Candace is always trying to bust her brothers but never succeeds, instead she's getting either injured or humiliated.
    • Dr. Doofenshmirtz trying to take over the tri-state area and constantly being thwarted by Perry the Platypus could count as well.
  • The Dreamstone toys with the concept somewhat (it probably borrows more from the premise of the Trope Namer's sister series Ralph Wolf And Sam Sheepdog) though is still clearly inspired by it, with the Urpneys frequently using cartoon gadgets to try and steal the Dreamstone from the Land Of Dreams. Expect Amusing Injuries galore.
  • Hanna-Barbera's Blast-Off Buzzard (a segment of 1977's CB Bears) had the title bird in pursuit of Crazy Legs Snake. And unlike H-B shows in general, this segment was completely dialogue-less.
  • DePatie-Freleng Enterprises' Crazy Legs Crane was always chasing a dragonfly (a tiny dragon with wings).
  • In Animaniacs, about half of Slappy Squirrels plots revolve around old villains trying to get Slappy, and failing badly.
  • Oddly enough, The Itchy & Scratchy Show in The Simpsons almost never actually use this trope, despite being a parody of Tom and Jerry, the premise being more an ultra violent Screwy Squirrel cartoon. In some episodes the mouse actually chases the cat (and always succeeds).
  • Angry Birds Toons revolves around the Bad Piggies attempting to steal the Angry Birds' eggs with the intent to eat them, and they're always thwarted. The show does, however, have the occasional Slice of Life plot instead, applying to either the birds or the pigs.
  • Oggy and the Cockroaches is an interesting case: while it's clear that the cockroaches are the antagonists of the series, either side of the ongoing fight can be the winner of the fight for the episode, sometimes both sides win, other times neither will, and yet still a third party can end up the winner.
  • Zig And Sharko, created by the creators of Oggy And The Cockroaches above. This one plays out more like a traditional Road Runner Vs. Coyote, though, with the added addition of Marina (the Road Runner of the series) having extra help to defeat Zig through Sharko, who uses brute force while Marina stays unaware of Zig's plans.
  • Wheelie And The Chopper Bunch had the former always getting antagonized by the latter, the latter's plans always failing on their part.

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