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My Rule Fu Is Stronger than Yours
"Don't worry about us, ma'am," Fix assured her, and winked. "Titania has already laid down the law. We've obeyed it. Not our fault if what she decreed was not what she wanted."

"Translation," I said. "We got around her fair and square. She won't like it, but she'll accept it."

It's safe to say that society as we know it couldn't exist without rules. Without rules, power would be the only source of order in the world, either in terms of destructive capability or material resources.

And like any tool that can be used for the common good, rules have the potential to be abused.

Rules have power, and their ability to level the playing field can also be used to unbalance it in favor of whomever makes the rules in the first place. So what can you do? You can always break the law, but the more clever will figure out how to beat them at their own game.

There are two ways this can happen:

  1. The rules can hang you, but the rules can also save you. Obstructive Bureaucrats and the like may think of the rules as a hammer to crush unworthy peons with, but the people who wrote the rules may have had other ideas: an apparently mean-spirited and arbitrary rule might have a reasonable exception buried in its text that the tyrants in charge prefer to conveniently ignore. Alternately, the roles may be reversed, and a villain who apparently has been caught dead to rights by the authorities finds a convenient loophole to wriggle through.
  2. The people who enforce the rules don't necessarily follow them. They may imagine themselves to be a higher class or more noble or pious or whatever, but in the end it's all because of the badge they wear or the title they hold: they're just as fallible as anyone else, and if these people insist that there's not a single rule they've ever broken, they can be sent screaming into a Villainous BSOD if someone finds that one obscure rule they did break, or points out a rule that they would never want to follow. (The more sociopathic might instead be compelled to dispose of whoever pointed out this fact, all to maintain their perfect record. Never mind that there are rules against murder in every culture on the face of the globe.) Again, this can have a dark side, as a paragon figure can be transformed into a Broken Pedestal if someone brings to light some transgression in his or her past.

An easy way to subvert Can't Get Away with Nuthin' '. See also Screw the Rules, I Have Money!. Compare Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right and Chaotic Good, where Lawful and Good are on opposite sides, and Loophole Abuse. Any Rules Lawyer often uses the first variant, and is afraid of somebody using the second on him.


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Examples of 1:

    Comic Books 
  • In one of the Donald Duck comics, the Beagle Boys use many strange laws and legal loopholes to get away with really stupid crimes (like stealing one certain kind of sandwich), just to piss off police and the judge. However, it backfires because the judge later finds other loopholes that make them guilty anyway (stealing that one kind of sandwich is not a crime... as long as you don't eat it before dusk).
  • A large part of Knights of the Dinner Table is an ongoing Rule Fu duel between Game Master B. A. Felton and Rules Lawyer Brian Van Hoose. Brian usually gets the better of B.A., but when the campaign is on the line, B.A. pulls out a win.
  • Being just about the living incarnation of Lawful Neutral, this crops up occasionally in Judge Dredd, typically in someone trying to "catch" Dredd overstepping his bounds, setting things up in a way that they annoy him into leaving him alone, or doing things that are legal by way of technicality. It rarely works out well for them, as Dredd IS the law, and is as adept with pulling up even more obscure rules and regulations to do the right (or, at least, legal) thing as he is with just shooting people in the face.

    Film 
  • In The Incredibles, Bob Parr (a.k.a. Mr. Incredible) works for an insurance company whose boss orders them to screw over the customers however possible; Bob gets around this by using Could Say It But to give the policy holders the information they need.
  • In Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, Barbossa opposes Jack's motion to the Brethren Court (to fight the EITC's armada) by quoting the code, calling his motion "an act of war", something which can only be declared by the Pirate King, an elected official. But since each Lord of the current Court only votes for himself, it's unlikely there will ever be a Pirate King again. Barbossa even calls on Teague, Keeper of the Code, to make sure this rule is enforced. Jack then calls for a vote, and when everyone else votes for themselves, Jack votes for the one Lord who supports his motion: Elisabeth. Jack gets his way and, since he followed the rules, no one can even complain. Kapow!
  • Part of the plot of the kangaroo military court in Harts War.

    Literature 

  • Jesus versus the Pharisees in The Bible, calling them out for violating other rules when they over-analyze laws (not helping people in need on the Sabbath going against why it exists in the first place). He also does it with Satan in the desert (If you walk off a cliff God will send angels to save you vs. You shouldn't tempt/test God).
  • Happens frequently in The Icelandic Sagas. Lacking a widespread writing system, law was taught orally; good knowledge of law earned a person great respect, although only a handful ever learned all the intricacies of the system. Courtroom scenes are common in the sagas, with knowledgeable people often playing key roles in the outcomes, to the detriment and benefit of both antagonists and protagonists.
  • In Isaac Asimov's story Blind Alley, a bureaucrat sets up a chain of events that allows a Dying Race of aliens to steal a fleet of spaceship and escape human space; the bureaucrat makes sure that there is an extensive (and legitimate) paper trail proving that he had nothing to do with it.
  • From the Deryni works by Katherine Kurtz:
    • Kelson's Courtroom Antics in the treason and heresy trial of Alaric Morgan in Deryni Rising are this to a fare-thee-well. He stalls for time by having the charges read in full, then asks for each member of the Regency Coucil to vote individually, then he casts Morgan's vote for him (causing a tie), since he's still a member of Council until he's convicted. Jehana objects, then casts a vote against him since Kelson is presiding in person. Once Kelson hears the clock chime the hour and knows he's turned fourteen, he asserts "I rule today!" and appoints Morgan's aide Sean Earl Derry to the vacant seat (one of the members was killed in an ambush days earlier); this forces a tie vote and Kelson breaks the tie, freeing Morgan and insisting that any resubmission of the charges will require further proof. Jehana is not happy to be defeated by a suddenly-grown son: "Kelson had stood before the Council and defied her—not with childish threats and impotent taunts, but with decisive, adult action...now that Kelson was King in fact as well as in name—a developments she hadn't even considered before—how could she possibly lure him away from Morgan's evil influence?"
    • When Istelyn delivers Loris' notice of Kelson's excommunication and Interdict for Gwynedd to the king at Dol Shaia, Kelson reads it and loses his temper. While Morgan is simply unimpressed, having gotten used to being excommunicate himself (and being a worldly by nature), Duncan calls the documents "worthless" and points out that Loris' reduced conclave of eleven bishops is insufficient to pass anything (canon law requires more than half of the twenty-two bishops to pass any such acts). Kelson scans the documents again, saying, " A twelfth. By God, you're right! How could I have forgotten?"
  • Subverted in Monstrous Regiment: Jackrum pretends to pull this by citing a non-existent rule; Blouse later catches Jackrum out when checking the rulebook. Then does nothing about it, and indeed compliments Jackrum on the exactitude of his citation.
    • This could be because he a) recognises on some level that Jackrum is very useful, b) also realises on some level that Jackrum could kill him in 2 seconds flat. It wouldn't be the first officer he's killed either.
    • The situation proves that both Jackrum and Blouse are good and useful in their own ways. Jackrum because he defies the rules, and Blouse because he knows them.
  • In David Brin's Uplift universe, the rules laid down by billions of years of galactic bureaucracy are extremely important. Even the most ruthless races are terrified of violating the "Standards for Acceptable Warfare."
  • Used in Dexta when Gloria (professional bureaucrat that she is) pulls out every rule in the book to trip up the corrupt Imperial Governor. This gets her promoted to Acting Imperial Governor with deliberately impossible orders ("enforce a cease-fire between two alien factions without using Imperial troops to defend aliens"), so she takes advantage of a militia that the Emperor didn't know about to solve the problem.
  • Happens frequently in The Dresden Files. The fae cannot tell a lie, must keep any promise made three times, and must follow legitimate orders. As a result, rule fu is a way of life and an honored skill. When Harry pulls his donut with white frosting trick, the entire summer court laughs about it for months and his status goes up considerably. On the other hand, when he gains the authority to command Cat Sith, he quickly realizes that his rule fu is not up to the task, and he'd better stick to orders Cat doesn't mind following.
  • By the same author, the Codex Alera books also feature a huge number of schemes and legal manipulation. Captain's Fury has one such example; Smug Snake Senator Arnos has ordered captain Tavi to execute civilians, arguing that they had committed treason by surrendering to Alera's enemies rather than fighting to the death against a vastly more powerful force that had no quarrel with them, and by the letter of the law he had the right to do so. He does this fully expecting that Tavi would refuse, and thus give the senator an excuse to accuse him of disobeying orders (and, by extension, treason against the Realm) and have him removed from office. Unfortunately, even after getting what he wanted, the senator refuses to repeal the execution order, as he wants to Make an Example of Them to discourage any further "traitors". Tavi solves the problem by peacefully relinquishing his office but leaving Crassus (the son and heir of a High Lord,) in charge in his stead, knowing that Crassus would also refuse to carry out the execution order. If Arnos then accused Crassus of treason, Crassus' father would have just cause to call Arnos to the juris macto and "scatter the leftover pieces all over Alera", but if Arnos didn't deal with both "traitors" the same way, he would undermine the charges against Tavi, leaving him little choice but to let the civilians live.

    Live Action TV 
  • Babylon 5:
    • The episode "By Any Means Necessary" centers on a dockers' strike on the eponymous station. The government's negotiator refuses to give the dockworkers anything in their demands for more personnel and better safety equipment and then invokes the Rush Act, which authorizes Commander Sinclair to use "any means necessary" to end the strike. He does this obviously hoping for Sinclair to use military force and to crush the dockworker union. Sinclair decides to resolve things by moving funds from the station's military budget to meet the dockers' demands instead, which he couldn't do until the negotiator invoked the Rush Act.
    • Sinclair tries this again in "Eyes", where he takes advantage of the rules regarding military intelligence inquiries. At first it seems to work, but eventually the investigator turns the rules in his favor, forcing Sinclair to change tactics.
    • A really awesome instance was Delenn demanding that the whole Minbari Civil War (which the warrior caste had theoretically won) be hazarded in a Self-Immolation contest because "It is the tradition of our people.".
  • In Breaking Bad, the owner of a salvage yard is particularly impressive in preventing Hank from searching an RV which he knows could be driven away the second it's out of his sight.
    Hank: I don't need a warrant, I have probable cause.
    Junkman: My understanding is that probable cause relates to something like a vehicle search.
    Hank: See those four round, rubber things? Those are wheels. This is a vehicle.
    Junkman: Did you actually see it drive onto the lot? I didn't think so. This is a domicile.
  • Doctor Who: In "Paradise Towers", the Doctor escapes the rules-obsessed Caretakers by citing various 'rules' that he has just made-up. None of the Caretakers are willing to admit that they are so unfamiliar with the rulebook that they don't recognise these 'rules'.
  • Just about every villain on Leverage can't be caught by the authorities because they haven't technically broken the law - that's where Nate and his team come in.
  • The fifth season of NewsRadio features a three-episode arc where Affably Evil Johnny Johnson successfully takes over Jimmy James' corporate empire. As a consolation prize, Johnny lets Jimmy take one WNYX employee with him as he tries to rebuild his empire. At the end of the day, Jimmy chooses... Johnny, who had named himself Dave's replacement as WNYX news director earlier in the day. Johnny immediately recognizes the brilliance of Jimmy's move and concedes defeat.
    Dave: But you're evil!
    Johnny: That's no excuse for poor sportsmanship.
  • The Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Ensigns of Command" revolved around a human colony on a world claimed by the Sheliak Corporate. The Sheliak demanded the removal of the human colonists before their own colonists arrived in four days; unfortunately, the colony has grown to the point that it would take three weeks to evacuate everyone. Picard tries to negotiate with the Sheliak only to be rebuffed as they cite various terms of the ridiculously complicated Treaty of Armens which rule in their favor. Finally, Picard looks through the Treaty himself and discovers a clause he can use against the Sheliak: he invokes the right to have a neutral third party arbitrate, and chooses the Grizzelas, who won't come out of hibernation for another six months. This time, it's the Sheliak's turn to balk (and finally, acquiesce).
    Riker: You enjoyed that.
    Picard: You're damn right.
  • In one episode of The West Wing, the President inadvertently accepts a gift that becomes politically troublesome. When he tries to return it, the local Obstructive Bureaucrat won't allow him, because it now belongs to the American people. Charlie tries several tacks to get it back, but the bureaucrat always finds a rule to block him. Finally, Charlie digs up a lawyer who's committed the entire US code to memory, and finds a clause specifying that the President can't accept a gift that would embarrass the United States.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Knights of the Dinner Table the gaming community of Muncie is made of this trope, but especially Brian Vanhoose who never met a rule he couldn't exploit. For example, a frustrated B.A. invoked obscure "overbearing" rules in his game (a target is automatically overbeared by an angry mob, consisting of at least ten people) over Brian's objections and delivered a Humiliation Conga to his group. Brian responded by having each party member hire 10 beggars to act as a mob and started mercilessly overbearing monsters.
  • In Rokugan, etiquette is one of the most important things to follow, sometimes resulting in a character getting his or her head cut off before the end of the night, without appeal, for saying something wrong or using inappropriate body language. The easiest way to get out of such a conundrum is to set it up so that reporting you would make more trouble for the person trying to make the report (for example: Ninjas officially do not exist. Trick someone into accusing you of being a ninja or not accusing you at all, and they have no choice but to shut up or be executed while you get punished for a minor crime or even get off scot free). Members of certain clans get special exemptions for limited etiquette breaches, but if they Rules Lawyer too much an NPC or fellow player is liable to say that they clearly know the rules and should be punished for their breaches accordingly.
  • There's a rather humorous story about a game of Diplomacy where during a Winter phase (when each player can raise units) Russia ordered a fleet be raised in Moscow (a landlocked province where fleets can't enter at all) and then tried to justify it as legal (normally such an order would be declared invalid and thus ignored) by refering to the rulebook. Turkey vehemently protested (in the context of the game, it was clear the move was hostile to him). Eventually, Italy and Turkey was able to use that same rulebook back on Russia to have the order declared invalid.

    Web Comics 

     Web Original 
  • Whateley Universe has Jadis' lawyer pull an epic one, made even more epic by going on for a good fifteen minutes, most of which is brushed over, but described as an epic battle, allowing the user to imagine it. Jadis got off.

    Real Life 
  • Urban legend: A modern student at Oxford or Cambridge points to a four-hundred year-old rule stating that the university must provide "cakes and ale" to him as he takes his exam. The university complies (with the modern equivalent, a burger and a Pepsi), and then promptly fines him for not wearing his sword to the examination.
  • This is how law in general works. There will generally be a good reason for a rule which nonetheless ends up being exploited for an unpredicted purpose by a Rules Lawyer in court or applied incorrectly/not as expected/exactly as written and no further.
  • This is why they had to get Al Capone on tax evasion; everything worse that he'd done, he'd managed to squeazle his way out of. The taxes were the only thing the authorities could actually make stick.
    • This also why tax forms in the US have a box to report "other income"note . If you've profited through any crime and don't report it, the government only has to prove that you have unaccounted-for income, so they can book you on tax evasion (and possibly filling out a falsified form) if nothing else. The presence of this box prevents any criminal from claiming that their illegal profits were unreported because they didn't fit any of the categories present.
      • However, income tax in general is more of a case of "bringing a sawed-off shotgun to a Rule Fu fight": Fill it in and you've confessed to a crime (unless you write in "Fifth Amendment" or otherwise invoke it on that form in regards to the source - it's not the IRS's job to prosecute you for violations of criminal code not involving taxesnote ), don't and you're guilty of tax evasion (for failing to report the amount of income).
      • On the other hand, you can deduct the costs of anything related to your illegal income because you can treat it like a business expense, for instance the legal fees associated with your inevitable legal court battle with the government.
  • One involving literally a Sawed-Off Shotgun: gun laws of some countries prohibit hidden firearms (for obvious reasons) and use of buckshot on large game (for humane reasons), but have a very narrow definition on what a "hunting long gun" means. That is, a long gun has a barrel over 30cm (12in) in length and a total length of at least 60cm (24in). That means a modern pump-action or semiautomatic shotgun could be cut to the legal minimum total length and be hidden but fully legal, while buckshot could be bought under the guise of range shooting, both providing a perfect cover for poaching. The solution was typically Obstructive Bureaucratic: specify that a civilian long gun has the legal length and a stock, and totally prohibit the sale of any buckshot round above size 4 (5-6mm per pellet).
  • The "Public Interest defence" built into the UK's Official Secrets Act, which at least theoretically guarantees immunity from prosecution for anyone leaking classified information to the press if and only if it proves that government officials have been breaking the law, abusing their authority or both.

Examples of 2:

    Comic Books 
  • One Dark Horse comic involved a Steampunk robot that killed people according to Bible quotations. To stop it, the protagonist countered every quote with one that was the complete opposite: "The lord is invincible"/"Chariots of iron";

    Literature 

    Western Animation 
  • Done once in Pig City: the Sadist Teacher becomes the new Director; only to lose his job when students prove he doesn't know Latin, which is required to perform this function.
  • An episode of Doug has Doug's entire class put into detention by Vice-Principal Bone. This prompts a Quailman fantasy sequence where Doug's superheroic alter ego faces down the Rulesmeister, master of arbitrary rules, and eventually defeats him by pointing out he's wearing mismatched socks, one of the many things he has a rule against. This carries over back into reality, when Mr. Bone snatches a comic book...and Doug points out that one of the rules is "No Snatching Other Peoples' Comics!"
  • In the Futurama episode "How Hermes Requisitioned His Groove Back", Hermes defeats Obstructive Bureaucrat Morgan Proctor by uncovering an old "notification of romantic entanglement" form she had filed. The file wasn't used as proof of sexual impropriety, however: it was the fact that she had stamped it four times instead of the requisite five that got her demoted. However Hermes also got demoted for organizing the Central Bureaucracy too fast, since "a good bureaucrat never finishes early" and he still had 5 seconds left on his time limit. Morgan's offence was considered bigger than Hermes's. She, who was a Grade 19 bureaucrat before this defeat, was forced to turn her bureaucrat badge in while Hermes was just demoted from Grade 36 to Grade 38. He was even promoted to Grade 37 for turning Morgan in.
  • In Storm Hawks, the heroes get into a competition with the Rex Guardians, another Sky Knight squadron. In each game, the Storm Hawks do better than the Rex Guardians, but lose because the Hawks aren't following 'The Code', an ancient set of rules the Guardians follow rigorously. In Piper's contest, she wins by pointing out her opponent's uniform isn't exactly as it should be, and the judges are forced to concede.
    Harrier: But...that was-!
    Piper: A taste of your own medicine?

    Real Life 
  • Discussions on the merits of religion in general and Christianity in particular - which, as we all know, are always civil and polite - often involve a fair amount of biblical Rule Fu. Expect Bible quotes containing bizarre and/or Values Dissonance-heavy rules to be tossed around liberally. More rarely, devout Christians arguing with other devout Christians may also play Rule Fu with the Bible.
    • Actually the tradition of Rule Fu among Christians is long and storied which has lead to the dozens of different denominations in existence today. This is at least partially a side-effect that the earliest Christians were converted Jews, and Jews Love to Argue about precisely this sort of thing.
    • Jesus didn't much care for the Rule Fu which is what He didn't like about the Pharisees. And according to some denominations His very existence was about creating a loophole and also guiding His followers more towards the spirit of the rules.


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