Fridge / Wreck-It Ralph

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    Fridge Brilliance 
  • Zangief isn't really a villain. But when the game first came into arcade, the Russian Communist was hardly the most popular character. Even his backstory (Let's promote Communism!) wasn't too altruistic. Not being played must have really sent him on a downward spiral and left him feeling like the bad guy. Now he's doing very well at the Bad-Anon! And people don't really think of him as a villain and play him more! This thought is based on how just because Alcoholics stop drinking doesn't mean they quit AA - they go to AA to share their experiences and prevent relapse! Or even to become sponsors.
    • Additionally, Word of God is that Zangief was put in there because he was That One Boss for the writer. Which makes sense. In a fighting game, each fighter is effectively a boss fight. If the players in your local arcade tend to hit a wall when fighting you, they'll probably treat you like a bad guy.
  • Fridge Tear Jerker: Look closely at Vanellope and Ralph's first interaction with each other; Vanellope wasn't rude to Ralph until he tells her to "go home". A few scenes later, we find out that Vanellope's "home" isn't really a home for her. The same could be said on Ralph's part. When Vanellope asks if Ralph is a hobo, he gets a bit annoyed since he is also homeless. Their rough start isn't just because they're rough around the edges, but because they unintentionally pushed each others' buttons.
  • Fix-It Felix Jr. talks with the "southern-y goody-two-shoes" accent and both he and Calhoun use plenty of Unusual Euphemisms, strange since the programmers of the games wouldn't have made them talk like that (especially in Felix's case, where he wasn't programmed to talk much at all). However, the games would have had to have met the ESRB or whatever other censorship organizations' standards (although in Felix's case, he comes from an era where most games were child-friendly anyway.) The characters are using the only words they can find. This leads to the greater fridge brilliance of realizing that ALL the characters' overall actions are built around this, which may explain lots of other weird customs in the arcade.
  • The arcade is one of those that keep the machines on continuously 24/7. No wonder things like Bad-Anon have to be formed, or that Turbo is able to take over Sugar Rush - the games are never reset. Old arcade game characters are aware for years - in the case of the oldest games like Pac-Man and Fix-It Felix Jr., over 30 years. No wonder they get neurotic (it only took 2 or 3 years for Turbo to, well, "go Turbo") and that would explain how bugs happen on arcade machines that run too long.
  • Speaking of time, "Celebration" by Kool and the Gang was released in 1980, so it makes sense the early 80's arcade games would pick it.
  • Look at Calhoun's fiance Brad and new love interest Felix side-by-side. They're actually quite similar in appearance; Felix is a more simplified, cartoonish version of Brad. They even do their hair the same.
    • Blink and you'll miss it, but the flower Brad's got tucked into his tuxedo pocket during his wedding is the same kind of flower Felix uses during his death animation (a calla lily, a flower associated with funerals and weddings, as well as themes of purity and rebirth—both of which seem to fit Felix and Brad.)
  • Ralph points out there's an awful lot of pink in King Candy's palace. Almost as if it were made for a little girl.
    • Not to mention King Candy's insistence that it's actually "salmon", which just makes the unusual design choice for his castle a little fishy.
  • King Candy recognizes Ralph immediately, while the other racers and Vanellope don't have any idea who he is. Turbo was Ralph's neighbour.
  • Listen carefully to the Jumbotron in Sugar Rush, when the players are putting in their gold coins. The voice that says "King Candy!" is higher-pitched. It sounds, under scrutiny, like Turbo's voice trying to sound like the Jumbotron. The other players' names are spoken in a deeper voice. Also, Vanellope's name is the only one where the intonation draws up in the end, hinting that she is special... in a good way.
  • Where does Vanellope get the car that she uses to save Ralph at the end? It was waiting for her at the bottom of the rainbow bridge. As Calhoun is covering the fleeing Sugar Rush citizens, you see Crumbelina pull up, abandon her kart, and run up the bridge. When Vanellope glitches past the Cy-Bugs, there's a kart waiting for her at the end of the bridge.
  • So why do the Bad-Guys Anonymous meetings take place in the ghost pen of Pac-Man? Pac-Man was the first game to have actual characters as villains as opposed to just enemies à la Pong and Space Invaders and this pen was where they would seek shelter and heal. In essence, the pen was where the very first villains gathered!
    • Even more fridge brilliance on why Clyde specifically is the leader of the group. Of the four original Pac-Ghosts, Clyde's AI is the one designed to shy away from Pac-Man. Clyde's the first reluctant video game bad guy.
    • The other probable reason that Clyde is the only Pac-Man ghost in Bad Anon is that he's suffering from All of the Other Reindeer syndrome within his own game. Not only does Clyde's name mark him as an outcast in the American version of Pac-Mannote , he was literally named "Stupid" in the original version. It figures that the designated Butt-Monkey ghost would be the one most interested in a support group.
    • There's also the manner that he talks - it comes off as calm and collected, but it might also be seen as very aloof and apathetic-sounding in tone. You can easily imagine how Clyde might act the same way during having to chase Pac-Man with other Ghosts.
  • Fridge Heartwarming reflecting on Bad-Anon: Pac-Man evacuates his own game to allow Bad-Anon to have solitude.
  • Close examination of the teaser image shows some redundant characters in the backdrop. Reason? Video game characters have extra lives. Additionally, if a game in the arcade has multiple cabinets, there would be duplicates of the cast per cabinet.
  • On the topic of Ralph's backstory in his game, there's some brilliance there in itself. Since Ralph is apparently only trying to destroy the apartment because its construction destroyed his home, well, he's not exactly looking like the bad guy here. But who is Ralph supposed to be an Expy of? Donkey Kong. And what was Donkey Kong's backstory in his original game? It's actually All There in the Manual that Donkey Kong was being abused by his owner and only stole his owner's girlfriend to get revenge for said abuse. Although still villainous, it's still an example of Hidden Depths present in the real-life game it's an expy of.
  • King Candy, the ruler of Sugar Rush, thinks he's all that and a bag of chips because he's the game's best racer. But his opponents on the race tracks are all much younger than him. That, and King Candy's been racing since the 80s. Chances are, he's pretty good by now.
  • When Ralph first meets Vanellope, she has a bunch of "funny" bits where he's trying to climb the candy cane tree and she has numerous Offscreen Teleportation bits where she's suddenly lying on a branch above him. It seems at the time she's just really fast and it's mostly visual Rule of Funny. Actually, she's teleporting via glitching without thinking about it; and Ralph is trying to ignore her.
  • Game jumping could serve as an explanation for various video game crossovers, like in the ending with Q*bert in Ralph's game.
  • When Vanellope says "I bet you really gotta watch where you step in a game called Hero's Duty", she's actually right. Remember the Cy-Bug eggs? And there's no doubt that Ralph really stepped in it when he was in that game.
  • When you think about it, Sugar Rush is the perfect game for Turbo to go after his own game was pulled. Because the game has a changing lineup of 9 racers every day, out of 16, he could easily sneak in without anyone thinking he didn't belong like last time.
    • Furthermore, if someone who usually frequents Litwak's goes to a different arcade or vice versa, while the difference might stand out a bit more, it still wouldn't be a red flag.
  • Why was Felix successful at wooing Calhoun? Well... he fixes things and she has a broken heart.
    • Adding to this, there's the part where he hops up and kisses her on the cheek at the end of the movie after Sugar Rush is saved. Mary does this to him at the end of his own game after he is victorious. It wasn't just an impulsive reaction he was rewarding her victory as a Nicelander would.
  • There is an interesting thing about the NesquikSand scene... What Felix initially decides to do, namely to just jump out, is actually the typical method to get out of quicksand in Platform Games, especially Mario games. Felix's panic could be seen as panicking because Sugar Rush does not follow that convention, being a Racing Game instead of a Platform Game. In Racing Games, you just get instantly put back on the track if something like that were to happen.
    • Alternately, when jumping out doesn't work, what do most gamers do? Spam the jump button until they get a Game Over, a track Felix was well on until Calhoun calmed him down.
  • The threat of the Cy-Bugs wasn't due to buggy code, but lazy code. Instead of properly cleaning up the characters at the end of the game, they simply create a situation that destroys them all.
  • Why does Ralph's medal work to enter Vanellope in the race, despite not being the same as the other gold coins? Because Vanellope didn't just steal the medal from Ralph, she raced him for it. She won it by racing, so it's a racing prize, so by the rules of the Random Daily Roster Race it counts as a legitimate entrance fee!
  • In the fake commercial for Hero's Duty, the studio credited with the game is Wreck-It Studios. Nice cameo in itself, but considering Felix and Calhoun end up a couple, it suggests a closer connection to the games. Given the name, Wreck-It Studios may even have been founded by a member of Tobikomi Inc., the company that made Fix-It Felix Jr.
    • Which would make sense when Felix calls Calhoun a "Dynamite Gal" and triggers a flashback to her late fiance Brad, who also uses the phrase - possibly as an in-universe in-joke to reference the fact that the character of Felix, one of the company's oldest characters, might have said the line at some point.
  • Possibly the most subtle video game reference in the movie: Ralph is a bad enough dude to save the president.
  • Sugar Rush probably doesn't have fall damage. This explains why Ralph doesn't die from the impact of free fall during his planned Heroic Sacrifice, which in real life should have happened when Vanellope saved him from the lava by catching him with her car.
    • Alternatively, since Ralph's been thrown off a building for the past 30 years, he may be immune to fall damage.
  • Why do the Bad Guys meet in Pac-Man's Ghost Pen? Nobody can die in it. Good Guys can't even enter it.
  • This movie actually explains and expands upon the Go-Karting with Bowser phenomenon! Mario doesn't hate Bowser; nor does Peach. The whole cast likes getting together for friendly games. And as shown in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Peach likes instilling this friendly camaraderie in other game characters.
    • Shigeru Miyamoto more or less confirmed this in an interview, where he said he considers the characters more like "actors" who play different parts depending on the game. So Bowser will play the part of a brutal usurper one game, then just a large racer the next.
  • At the end of the movie, Vanellope discovers she's really supposed to be the ruler of the game, but decides that a democracy would fit better. It's probably a coincidence that this film was released the week before the 2012 presidential election! The mock ad for Fix-It Felix Jr.'s Magic Hammer even lampshades this!
    • Which leads us to realize another thing - the "New Racers Daily" rule, once you think about it, works pretty much like presidential terms: different people get to do it eventually, as they switch places with each other. Which is further enforced by King Candy's "I'll get a head start anyway", which is implied to be the rule and as such is another arrow pointing at how, while respecting the "New Racers Daily" rule, the sharp contrast with it is a sign that King Candy forced his way into the game, therefore playing royalty - a recurring theme in Disney movies - much like a dictatorship.
  • Calhoun has to have Felix explain the term "going Turbo" to her because her game was plugged in fairly recently. But since Sugar Rush had been around for years, no one else knowing about Turbo (with Vanellope not even recognizing Turbo at all) is just a little strange. But it's a hint that King Candy had messed with the game's code—they weren't just made to forget Vanellope and view him as their rightful ruler, they were also made to forget Turbo and what he did so they wouldn't make the connection.
  • If you watch the scene where Ralph threatens Sour Bill and licks him, you can actually see the layers of him coming off, since he has fewer rings around his eyes at the end of the scene than at the beginning. It also makes him look a lot less tired and grumpy and shows his Character Development.
  • When the Cy-Bugs reproduce in Sugar Rush, they change their shape to resemble silverfish, which are notorious for eating carbohydrates or sugars. Guess what the entire world is made out of?
  • Why is it seemingly so easy for Felix to initially convince Calhoun to let him come along? Because he basically (if not directly) said that it's his duty to do so and if he doesn't, something bad will happen. Basically, he unknowingly appeals to her backstory.
  • Felix can dodge Calhoun's shots because 1) dodging stuff is half the gameplay in his game (he has to dodge falling bricks from Ralph) and 2) his jerky 8-bit movement is a lot like rubberbanding/lag/etc in a modern shooter which makes a target really really really hard to hit.
    • And even though he's so much shorter than his eventual love interest — well, we've already established how well he can jump, right?
  • Q*Bert and co. are homeless not because of lack of popularity or anything but because it's a Shout-Out to the video game crash which, among other things, caused a lot of arcades to fall on hard times and/or go out of business.
  • Elaborating on Vanellope's glitching, Word of God confirms that it is a glitch as a result of what Turbo did to her, but the fact that she can still use it like a special ability during the game proper could mean that it's a glitching/replacement of whatever her actual special ability was, and not just random teleporting.
  • Some have questioned Sonic's cameo considering that he has little presence in Arcade gaming short of one game (Sonic the Fighters, which to be fair can be seen in the arcade.) However, he is the mascot of SEGA, who in turn has had one of the strongest run of Arcade games in history.
  • King Candy's role as a traitor who didn't belong in his game is made more obvious by his design: all the other characters in Sugar Rush have a chibi-like design more commonly associated with Japanese cartoons, whereas King Candy has a more Western/Disney-esque design similar to the Mad Hatter from Disney's Alice in Wonderland.
  • The "Aerith Lives" graffiti: Seeing such a blatant home console-exclusive reference in an arcade setting (outside of blatant fourth wall fanservice) can seem rather bizarre, since it's highly unlikely they'd know about them. But it's possible that Litwak's actually has an Ehrgeiz cabinet, which has Cloud Strife and Tifa Lockhart as fighters named "Guardian" and "Summoner" respectively, and Cloud would be programmed with memories of his FFVII storyline.
  • Vanellope may have offered a subtle bit of foreshadowing when she asks Ralph if he means "the royal we". She is a princess, after all.
  • If double stripes break, why would the gate to the candy car factory be made of a double stripes candy cane? Two reasons- the meta reason is that gates almost always get crashed in movies and TV shows, and the in-universe reason is that the only one they'd want to keep out of the factory is Vanellope (who would never have even gotten close to getting inside without Ralph).
  • People think the Nicelanders, Gene especially, are stupid for messing with Ralph because Ralph can really wreck them. However, only Gene really antagonizes him, the rest are just very wary and insensitive. Now you might think Gene is still a massive idiot for provoking Ralph, but Gene is supposedly the guy Ralph throws at the beginning of the game. Given that, not only does Gene hate Ralph, but there's no harm Ralph can threaten Gene with that he doesn't already do every time the game boots up.
  • The movie's depiction of the "brokenness" of games and the flaws of the characters might not always follow real-world logic, but it rings very true to how games are programmed in real life:
    • When the little girl tries to play Fix-It Felix Jr., and Ralph is missing, it looks just like you'd expect, at least until people start freaking out. The speech bubble appears, but not the character; the game just kinda sits there waiting for him to start destroying, even though he's nowhere to be seen. Felix just stands still, tossing his hammer. It's a pretty accurate depiction of how games often react when an important character fails to appear.
    • Ralph just can't help but break things. Without even trying, he's smashing ceilings, crashing through floors, wrecking everything in sight. That's what happens when you put a character in a place (or indeed, a game) that was never programmed for it. He's breaking the games just by virtue of being in them.
      • In the kart bakery, he seems to have broken the minigame not just physically, but also such that it creates a kart with much higher speed than any others in the game (impossibly high stats) and a rather strange paint job (corrupted textures). He's not breaking things by being clumsy so much as by being incompatible with the programming of a completely different game. Even just being in the penthouse was causing damage, because the game was never programmed to handle that. Outside of his own game, Ralph is a sort of glitch himself.
    • The Cy-Bugs are breeding in a hidden underground cave of Sugar Rush that doesn't appear to have any entrances - a sort of Minus World, perhaps.
    • Obviously, Pac-Man kill screens. Someone did at least that much research.
    • Glitches can't leave their games, because technically, they don't exist at all - they're only a side effect of the programming, that isn't present in other games with different programs.
  • The arcade owner dresses like a referee. Because he runs the games and looks out for anything unfair, like a game taking coins and not starting because the antagonist is MIA.
  • The 2012 Olympics advertising campaign makes even more sense than expected when you factor in how Ralph's specific goal is to get a medal.
  • The trailer shows a "Game Over" when Ralph is tossed off the tower, when it should actually be more like "Level 1 Complete" as it is in the game itself. But Ralph is the movie's protagonist (for the most part), so to him, that moment is losing.
  • Why do all the Sugar Rush characters have such fancy (almost to the point of ridiculous or even disgusting) names? Since the game is most likely from Japan, it's either a hit-and-miss translation attempt or the designers really wanted to try sounding cool (a la Travis Touchdown).
    • The fancy names also highlight King Candy's name as the Odd Name Out for being so plain and straightforward. It not only serves as a clue that he's a foreign element in the game, but also what sort of game he did come from (his original name was just as straightforward, Turbo).
  • Vanellope's name sounds a whole lot like "Vanilla Bean". It can be said that vanilla is the "king" of sweet flavors, so Vanellope is definitely a Meaningful Name.
  • In the scene where Ralph first goes to Sugar Rush, he runs into Sonic just outside the gate, who loses his rings, gets thrown backwards, and can be seen flashing for a few seconds as if he's been given Mercy Invincibility. The Brilliance comes from the fact that, since Sonic is the one seen giving the PSA warning about traveling out of your game, it'd make sense he'd carry rings on him at all times, just in case something like that happens (those who heed his warning might even be carrying whatever it is their game needs for them to take a hit and not die on the spot).
    • Further proven by the fact that Ralph found a Super Mushroom in Tapper's Lost and Found. Why would it be there in the first place unless someone else brought it to Tapper's?
    • Same for the ! symbol. At least for the NPC guards, it helps them determine when they might be in a dangerous situation. Zangief's briefs, on the other hand...
  • Why is there a working escape pod on the last level of Hero's Duty? It could factor into the game's final cutscene or Boss Battle, which didn't play because Ralph bashed his way in through an exterior wall.
  • The pure size of Ralph's hands might not be the only thing that makes Vanellope see them as "freakishly huge". He happens to have one more finger than is customary in her game's world.
  • Sonic being the one to give the dying outside your game PSA fits because it's essentially an in-universe Sonic Sez.
  • The fact that Ralph and Felix respawn in the Hero's Duty and Sugar Rush areas of the tie-in game at first seems to clash with what Sonic said, that if you die outside your game, you don't respawn. But on reflection, the characters from the tie-in aren't the same ones from the movie. The tie in is their game.
  • Zombie flopping against Ralph after his profound statement wasn't just Zombie being uh... limp. He's actually trying to lean against Ralph and give him some sort of comforting gesture (a hug maybe) but being well...a zombie, he really doesn't have the mobility to actually do that.
  • Why does Ralph get all wimpy during the training montage? He's not, he's actually just being cautious since he doesn't know how much damage he can take in another game before dying! Considering he gets hit on the head with a giant column, he's certainly lucky!
  • How would the characters in a racing game that depicts cars but no human racers (like Roadblasters) be rendered? Pixar has already released a certain other movie starring sentient cars.
  • Ever heard of the phrase "flavor of the month" when used to refer to a class or character in a game? Sugar Rush allows for all the racers be to be OP once in a while.
  • It's easy to get on Vanellope's case for simply declaring herself president of a constitutional democracy without actually holding an election. But for what it's worth, she hasn't exactly had a chance to draft up her new government or have any elections just yet. It's only proper that she remain as the official princess ruler of the game until she gets that finished up so that Sugar Rush can have a stable government in the meantime.
  • When you think about it Turbo was already a corruptive parasite in Sugar Rush. So when the Cy-Bug eats him, it makes sense that he does the same to it.
  • When the backstory of the term "going Turbo" is explained, there's only one light going through the wires, in sharp contrast with the four lights showing Ralph and the other baddies' train. So why, instead of four train cars, is there a single car in Turbo's case? Considering there's no way Turbo could fit his car on the train, most likely Turbo literally drove to Road Blasters. Yep, he was nuts long before the events of the movie.
  • It's strange that Turbo has an Obviously Evil appearance with gray skin when he was originally created as a player character. But it's easily possible that this was because of the technical limitations of the game, with the game art on the console being colored to match. That might also explain Turbo Time losing popularity; what kid would want the protagonist to appear Obviously Evil?
  • Why does Ralph keep saying he "earned" his medal in Hero's Duty, despite the fact that from a game perspective he cheated (climbing up the side of the building and breaking in)? Because he did just what Markowski had said. He climbed the building and he fought bugs. More tellingly, he also did exactly what he was supposed to do according to his programming, i.e. climb building, break building.
  • The dummied-out level in Sugar Rush. Who says it was dummied out to begin with? It seems to be the only level to contain an actually lethal hazard (the Diet Cola/Mentos thing) as opposed to just intense obstacles (Candlehead's cherry bombs and the gumball avalanche) and we all know what would happen if a certain character "died" in Sugar Rush. Furthermore, we see him messing with the code onscreen.
  • The scene where Litwak greets the customers coming into the arcade in the morning has him greet two kids before letting a full grown adult in, perhaps an acknowledgement towards the film's own Periphery Demographic.
  • If you think about it, the brilliance of Ralph's idea to help out Q*Bert and friends at the end isn't just in the broad concept of retro characters finding a new game in his game; it's in the realization that his game is far and away the ideal game for them to move into. They go in as additional wreckers, bad guys in a game where the good guy can't do anything but fix things. There isn't any way for them to get killed, so they don't have to worry about being Killed Off for Real!
  • Kano's statement of "You can't mess with the program." Though he perhaps means "You are what you are." or perhaps "It is impossible to change the code of the game.", we should take this in hindsight as instead "You should not change the code because it leads down a dark path as it did with Turbo."
  • Why does Ralph always get stopped by the Surge Protector? It's not because he's a bad guy or because he hates him or anything like that. It's because he's huge; the Surge Protector has to stop large voltage spikes, and since Ralph is so tall and weighs so much, of course he's going to use a lot of power.
    • Additionally, Ralph is stopped more than Bowser or Ralph-as-a-Hero's-Duty-character because he's an old, sprite based game, whereas the other large characters are from consoles that are expected to require more power.
  • Another thing that might have shown King Candy to be not as kind as his subjects are tricked into believing: when we first see him, he greets his subjects and throws candy at them, saying "Have some candy!". Sounds nice enough until you realize that his subjects are made of candy and that "Have some candy!" is his racing taunt, along with the ability to throw candy at the other racers. If you think it about more, saying "Have some candy!" to candy people is basically saying to them "Go eat yourself!"/"Eat this!" (well, a more NSFW phrase) in about a polite yet two-faced/backhanded way possible.
  • When Ralph crash-lands in Sugar Rush, a very Japanese-style game (its theme song is in Japanese), what are the very first words Ralph says? "Sayonara, sucker!", "sayonara" being Japanese for "goodbye" and sucker being another word for a lollipop.
  • Why was the Bad Anon group as a whole very pleased to have Ralph? Sure, he was one of them. But also consider who Ralph is from their perspective. Much like Clyde, he's this wise old man who has been around the block many times. To have both of the arcade originals (that is, the two villains whose cabinets have been at Litwak's since the beginning) would be probably be somewhat of a fanboy dream, at least for a little bit.
  • Gene being the last one in FIFJ to pack up and leave. Yeah, story wise it's a good call over all. But think about what it implies/suggests. Gene - resident Jerk Ass and biggest hater of Ralph - held out the longest that Ralph would come home. Whether because he was worried about Ralph, worried about the Nicelanders, Ralph coming homing a failure would prove him right, or even Ralph coming home meaning he could be rid of Ralph, Gene nevertheless had the greatest hope that Ralph would come home, somehow.
  • "Top shelf." Certainly there's a natural innate connotation to it of high quality stuff. But consider Sugar Rush in particular. There's a roster screen. And typically in roster screens, the biggest names in the game will be on the top row AKA the top shelf of the roster.
    • "Top shelf" also specifically refers to specialty food items, usually things like candy (like you see in movies and cartoons. Or alcohol, but that's not appropriate for a kid-oriented game like Sugar Rush.
  • Turbo gives a quick freeze-frame thumbs up to the audience. He's doing this while glitching out of his King Candy persona. What pose does he make when he says his Catch-Phrase? A thumbs up. He's briefly glitching into his "Turbotastic" pose!
    • King Candy's and Turbo's Catch Phrases are the same number of syllables.
  • King Candy's As You Know speech is just exposition until you remember that Turbo messed with the characters memories.
  • Since King Candy is actually Turbo, what does that make his disguise? A candy wrapper.
  • When the other kids bully Vanellope, Ralph is just standing by and is disgusted, but when does he get really mad and intervene? When Taffyta shoves Vanellope into a puddle of mud (well, chocolate) - naturally that would be a sore spot with him, considering what happens at the end of each level for him!
  • The "Made by Vanellope and Ralph" writing on Vanellope's kart should be a strange sight to the players racing as Vanellope, but it could have easily been rationalized as a simple Shout-Out to one of Tobikomi's most enduring characters - after all, the two games are made by the same company.
  • Skrillex's cameo does make sense- the arcade plays Skrillex music, and the stereo is plugged into the same surge protector. He came over from the stereo!
    • Or Skrillex is in a DJ Hero-like game in the Wreck-It!Verse.
  • If Cybugs are viruses, does that make Calhoun and her men antivirus software?
    • And what ends up destroying the ones tearing Sugar Rush apart in the end? One giant Firewall.
  • Early in the movie, while still in his own game, Felix's goes through his death animation just from being hit by a piece of falling ceiling, making him look like a One-Hit-Point Wonder even though he takes more damage than that later on in the movie. This makes sense, since during gameplay, Felix is injured by Ralph throwing pieces of the building. It's likely that his death animation is specifically set off by building debris, particularly since the debris was generated by Ralph in the first place.
  • Felix's "high definition" comment is a little odd since, while he is from 8-bit while Calhoun's from 3D, they both are at least close to the same animation style in "real life." However, remember that there are several phrases, such as "top shelf," which indicate that the world has its own slang. It's entirely possible that "high definition" is simply the game universe's version of calling someone pretty. That said, there are some minor differences between how Felix and Calhoun are rendered.
  • Why does Ralph appear normal in Hero's Duty? He "replaces" Markowski in the game so the game is able to render him with modern graphics instead of his 8-bit version. If you pay attention every time a character jumps games and appears correctly it is either because the games are similar graphics like when Q*bert becomes a bonus level in Fix-It Felix Jr. or because they replaced an existing character. This also explains why Turbo appears as his 8-bit form in Road Blasters. He just tried racing in the game as an extra character and so showed up as his 8-bit self which wasn't compatible and crashed the game. This also explains why he took the time to replace Vanellope because if he didn't he would show up as an 8-bit character again and create problems in Sugar Rush. By booting Vanellope out of the game as a glitch he was able to take her place and be rendered in a way that the game could handle as instead of showing up as a 2D sprite again. In addition to that, consider that an early draft had Turbo and King Candy as separate characters. Meaning KC was originally a harmless NPC in the game (he and Vannelope might have switched roles sitting in the throne). Turbo didn't just "replace" Vannelope when he took on the King Candy persona, he outright killed a man and wore his face to do it.
  • When examining the pedals on Vanellope's new kart, Ralph decides that the clutch pedal probably doesn't do anything. A handful of arcade racers do have a physical clutch pedal that really are functionally useless; requiring its use would be a serious turn-off to the average arcade patron.
  • The game Sugar Rush seems to have a boatload of advertisements, which would perplex the viewer upon first glance. Keep in mind the game was created in 1997...when product placement became more common. Of course it would have so much of it.
  • As the characters are leaving the Pac-Man maze near the beginning of the movie, a restroom for both Pac-Man and Ms. Pac-Man can be seen. Which makes sense, as both games run on the same board.
  • Why is Vanellope so easily forgiving of Ralph and the Sugar Rush racers? Well, she is a Sweet Princess.
  • When Felix and Calhoun get married at the end, the soldiers raise their guns at the glass in case another Cy-Bug appears. This may just seem like a case of paranoia, but when you play the same video game level twice, you also expect the exact same things to happen.
  • What Ralph does to defeat Turbo is exactly what he does in his game: he stands on a tall structure, smashes it with his fists and gets thrown into a pool of goo in the end. Only this time, he enjoys it.
  • There's an extra irony about Ralph's line, "When did video games become so violent and scary?" 1988. That's when Splatterhouse came out, the first violent beat 'em up that involves a big guy masking himself and becoming something he's not, on a quest to restore the damsel to her true self, who has to fight hordes of monsters bred underneath the location (including a giant one,) and they all got destroyed in a blazing fire at the end. It was played on the Turbografx-16.
  • Why would Sugar Rush have double-stripe candy cane branches and Nesquick-sand, plus a minigame where you make your own kart? Wouldn't those be more at home in a platforming game? Well, sometimes full games are ported into arcade machines. Maybe there's a home version of the game which has platforming aspects, and the game was exported to arcade format, but the original code was left in.
  • Notice how in the one opportunity that Surge Protector actually has to prevent a disaster (when Ralph carries the dangerous cybug out of the safe confinement of it's own game and into Sugar Rush), he is powerless to do anything? Most computer store owners will attest that typical surge protectors - like the kind built in to common powerboards - are useless and that only the high-end models ($200 and up) offer any reliable protection to people's electronic devices.
  • Why is the animation of the Nicelanders so choppy while Ralph and Felix are fully animated? Because, as the hero and villain of the game, they have more frames programmed. While the NPCs will have just one or two.
  • The various games represent their respective decade's programming styles accurately:
    • Wreck-it Ralph and Turbo Time are created in the late 70s to early 80s. At this period games were usually stored in either mask ROM or battery-backed SRAM, both of which makes storage at an extreme premium. Games at that era often have to employ tricks like metaprogramming and self-modifying code just to make the game's code and resources fit into the limited storage space.
      • This explains why game characters hailed from 80s have the ability to modify a game's code. Their games require such on-the-fly patching to work properly.
    • Sugar Rush is created in the boring age of computing, where the old storage restrictions have been lifted by the invention of CD-ROMs and gigabyte-sized hard disk drives. This means that a modern-style game engines can be used with interesting new features like hypervisors and virtual machines are largely nonexistent.
      • This also explains why Turbo can stay there, and why this game would suffer the most if taken over by Cy-bugs. Sugar Rush has absolutely no protection built inside the code from it being ruined, so Turbo can bend it towards his own will, Vanellope can decide to keep her corrupted special skill code in place as her skill in place of whatever she was officially intended to have.
    • Hero's Duty is created in modern times where all kinds of interesting technologies exist, like hypervisors or virtual machines that is capable of making sure the game is operating within specs. Also in the modern age we have MAME, the emulator that allows modern PCs to simulate older arcades.
      • This is why Cy-bugs won't cause lasting damage within that game. If the game ran out of parameter, the hypervisor reverts it to the last known good state. This also explains why Ralph and Felix's game jumping does not cause glitches, as they have leveraged the hypervisor in Hero's Duty game to refine their code in modern games, resulted in two bug-free, modern-game-compatible vintage characters.
      • Hero's Duty is also where Felix-compatible code for other abandoned characters are generated. They loaded an instance of MAME onto the Hero's Duty game with FIFJ's code in it and modified all other retro characters in, ironing out all the bugs in the meanwhile, using HD's hypervisor as a safety mechanism for this extensive game code modifying.
  • There's a TRON game in the arcade as a Shout-Out. Now, think about the Recursive Canon explanation given in both the FPS and filmed sequels. If that game is a nod to the films being in a shared universe (after all, they're both Disney), it would explain a ridiculous amount about both. It would also make one of the nastiest bits of Fridge Horror about Flynn's Arcade turn out to be not so bad after all; the games were never supposed to be lethal or even harmful. The death-match element was just Master Control perverting it to his own ends and behaving like a dick.
  • King Candy's wariness of having outsiders in his kingdom makes sense since there's a risk of them having recognized Vanellope from the side of the cabinet, which Ralph ends up doing later.
  • Vanellope declares that Sugar Rush's monarchy will be replaced with a democracy and declares herself president. Then she invites Ralph to live in her castle. The fridge brilliance comes in when you recall how all the candy people adored King Candy; he was living off Vanellope's popularity. She could be continuously elected. That why she can stay in charge but won't have to wear a pink pretty dress.

    Fridge Horror 
  • Game Central Station, which has dozens of games hooked up to it, is actually at major risk of blowing a fuse, cutting power to every console hooked up to it at that moment... Even ignoring that, what would happen if Litwak's ever experienced a power outage of any kind, or decided to save on power by turning off the consoles? The movie's lore doesn't specify if that would harm the characters or just be the equivalent of putting them to sleep (although admittedly, the latter is more likely as it's impossible for the Wreck-it Ralph game to have been on uninterrupted for thirty years.)
    • More disturbing, what would happen if the surge protector ever got unplugged while characters were out of their game? It's very likely that every character inside of Game Central Station would cease to exist.
  • Let's just hope that Polybius really IS nothing more than an Urban Legend of Zelda. Otherwise, we would have the ultimate Disney Acid Sequence.
  • It's a little creepy in retrospect that Sonic is the one who gives the PSA about dying outside your game. His arcade game had two characters who have not reappeared in any games since.
  • In the ending the game-less characters make cameos in Fix-It Felix Jr.'s bonus levels. Though no longer homeless, they're now at risk at dying permanently (albeit less so than in any other game, admittedly.)
  • In the Sugar Rush Arcade commercial, both Vanellope and King Candy are selectable characters. If the trailer was canon (it's probably not), consider that the Sugar Rush trailer wouldn't be based on Litwak's game, it would be based on the original release of Sugar Rush. Meaning King Candy was a real character before Turbo showed up. So instead of creating him, Turbo took his place. This could provide an explanation for why there's still a section in the grandstands with the King Candy emblem. Should this be true, and we put two and two together, what with Princess Vanellope and King Candy both being actual characters..... This implies Turbo essentially killed her father.
  • Possibly one of the most fridge-horrific lines in the entire movie is "she was programmed with the most tragic backstory ever". Calhoun's husband was never real in the sense that the other Hero's Duty characters were. Because he only existed before his actual game took place, he was never coded in the game as a real character (at least in this particular arcade game,) he was only coded as a memory that Calhoun happens to possess. He was never actually real, but Calhoun is still forced to relive the painful, artificial memory over and over as though he was, because that's her "backstory".
    • Additionally, Brad only ever existed as a backstory element. Calhoun never got to experience the good parts of the relationship. She is left only with the harrowing aftermath.
  • So Ralph removes Markowski's power suit, puts it on over his overalls and leaves the guy wearing briefs from the lost and found pile...does this imply Markowski was naked underneath it? Although it does make sense that a programmer would not program clothes on a character only ever seen clad in armor.
  • Although seeing Ralph panic and freak out in Hero's Duty was funny from our end, he had every reason to be afraid; he could really have died in it! Especially since the Cy-Bugs weren't just actors like him.
  • When King Candy/Turbo gets eaten by a CyBug, he still shows self-awareness. Suddenly Calhoun's backstory is a lot more tragic now.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Fridge/WreckItRalph