History Fridge / WreckItRalph

21st Jul '16 2:41:25 PM gothelittle
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** Old games are sprite-based; the hardware supports a certain number of sprites on the screen at a time. While one might think that each sprite would correspond to one character, it was not uncommon for a Big Boss to use multiple sprites, especially if you had to defeat different parts of him. Based on the level of complexity of Fix It Felix Jr., I would guess that Ralph is at least a two-sprite character; one for his body/head and one for his arms. He could also be a three-sprite character, with each fist being independent or with his head and body being independent from each other and from his arms. A "super-sized" character like that, coming from a sprite-rendered game like Pac Man or to/from a sprite-rendered game like Fix It Felix Jr. might merit watching. To explain the implied question above mine, Bowser is rendered as a single sprite character in his original game.
3rd Jul '16 12:40:48 PM Kaabisteru
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** There's also the manner that he talks - it comes off as calm and collected, but it might also be seen as very aloof and apathetic-sounding in tone. You can easily imagine how Clyde might act the same way during having to chase Pac-Man with other Ghosts.
22nd May '16 6:19:46 PM technix
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* The games represent their respective decase's programming styles well too:
** Wreck-it Ralph and Turbo Time are created in the late 70s to early 80s. At this period games are usually stored in either mask ROM or battery-backed SRAM, both of which makes storage at extreme premium. Games at that era often have to employ NecessaryWeasels like metaprogramming and self-modifying code just to make the game code and resources fit into the limited storage space.
*** This explains why games characters hailed from 80s have the ability to modify a game's code. Their games require such on-the-fly paching to work properly.
** Sugar Rush is created in the boring age of computing, where the storage restriction have been lifted by the invention of [=CD-ROMs=] and gigabyte-sized hard disk drives. This means that a modern-style game engines can be used tey interesting new features like hypervisors and virtual machines are largely nonexisant.
*** This also explains why Turbo can stay there, and why this game would suffer the most if taken over by Cy-bugs. Sugar Rush have absolutely no protection built inside the code from it being ruined, so Turbo can bend it towards his own will, Vanellope can decide to keep her corrupted special skill code in place as her official skill in place of whatever she was intended to have.
** Hero's Duty is created in modern times where all kinds of interesting technologies exist, like hypervisors or virtual machines that is capable of making sure the game is operating within specs. Also in the modern age we have MAME, the emulator that allows modern PCs to simulate older arcades.
*** This is why Cy-bugs wont cause lasting damage within that game. If the game ran out of parameter the hypervisor reverts it to the last known good state. This also explains why Ralph and Felix's game jumping does not cause glitches, as they have leveraged the hypervisor in Hero's Duty game to refine their code in modern games, resulted in two bug-free modern-game-compatible vintage characters.
*** Hero's Duty is also where Felix-compatible code for other abandoned characters are generated. They loaded an instance of MAME onto the Hero's Duty game with FIFJ's code in it and modifyed all other retro characters in, ironong out all the bugs in the meanwhile, using HD's hypervisor as a safety mechanism for this extensive game code modifying.
3rd May '16 11:37:53 AM Oddtail
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** This could probably use some elaborating... how is this a Fridge moment? It's quite explicitly shown in the movie that's how Ralph thinks of earning the medal, even long before he actually does. It's shown in his interactions with Markowski and his overall plan... that's explicit text, not something implicit and Fridgey.


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** This is contradicted by the actual events in the movie. Ralph learns that the part of the cake in the shape of a mud puddle is chocolate, and only that makes him upset. So it's clearly not about the mud puddle, it's about the chocolate. What, if he learnt that the puddle was made out of something other than chocolate, the *puddle of mud* would remind him of a puddle of mud to a lesser extent, somehow?


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** This is unclear - how is this a Fridge moment for the movie (as opposed to a random piece of trivia)? Is there something in the movie that references Splatterhouse?


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** How does the fact that a character may eventually die constitute FridgeHorror ? That happens to literally everyone in real life, and to almost all fictional characters. But the FridgeHorror page for every story involving humans does not feature a "wait... they will DIE eventually" entry.
4th Apr '16 8:25:53 AM MrDeath
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** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. '''[[BreakingBad Ralph is]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad not]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad in danger, Troper. Ralph]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the danger!]]''' [[BreakingBad A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] ''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.

to:

** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. '''[[BreakingBad Ralph is]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad not]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad in danger, Troper. Ralph]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the danger!]]''' [[BreakingBad A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] ''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.
3rd Apr '16 1:20:35 AM RockySamson
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** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad '''Ralph is ''not'' in danger, Troper. Ralph ''is'' the danger!''' A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] ''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He ''is'' the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.

to:

** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad '''Ralph is ''not'' '''[[BreakingBad Ralph is]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad not]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad in danger, Troper. Ralph ''is'' Ralph]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the danger!''' danger!]]''' [[BreakingBad A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] ''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He ''is'' He]]''' '''''[[BreakingBad is]]''''' '''[[BreakingBad the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.
3rd Apr '16 1:13:25 AM RockySamson
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** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. '''[[BreakingBad Ralph is ''not'' in danger, Troper. Ralph ''is'' the danger!''' A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]]''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He ''is'' the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.

to:

** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. '''[[BreakingBad Ralph [[BreakingBad '''Ralph is ''not'' in danger, Troper. Ralph ''is'' the danger!''' A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]]''[[LittleNo Ralph?]] ''[[LittleNo No.]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He ''is'' the one who wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.
3rd Apr '16 1:12:19 AM RockySamson
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** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die "inside TheMatrix" (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad Ralph is not in danger, Troper. Ralph is the danger! A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] [[LittleNo No.]] [[MundaneMadeAwesome He is the one who wrecks!]] Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.

to:

** Even more FridgeBrilliance when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die "inside TheMatrix" ''"inside TheMatrix"'' (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad '''[[BreakingBad Ralph is not ''not'' in danger, Troper. Ralph is ''is'' the danger! danger!''' A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] [[LittleNo Ralph?]]''[[LittleNo No.]] [[MundaneMadeAwesome ]]'' '''[[MundaneMadeAwesome He is ''is'' the one who wrecks!]] wrecks!]]''' Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.
3rd Apr '16 1:08:17 AM RockySamson
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** Extra FridgeBrilliance that just occurred to me while reading the above. Consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die "inside TheMatrix" (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad Ralph is not in danger, Troper. Ralph is the danger! A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] [[FlatNo No.]] [[MundaneMadeAwesome He is the one who wrecks!]] Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! No wonder he panicked in the Nesquicksand!

to:

** Extra Even more FridgeBrilliance that just occurred to me while reading the above. Consider when you consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die "inside TheMatrix" (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad Ralph is not in danger, Troper. Ralph is the danger! A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] [[FlatNo [[LittleNo No.]] [[MundaneMadeAwesome He is the one who wrecks!]] Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! Which makes perfect sense, given he's supposed to be the hero. No wonder he panicked in the Nesquicksand!Nesquick Sand! This also accentuates the motif of Ralph being the bad guy. By proxy, he does more harm to everyone around him than he ever could do to himself.
3rd Apr '16 1:02:23 AM RockySamson
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** Extra FridgeBrilliance that just occurred to me while reading the above. Consider the following: All video game characters are warned that if they die "inside TheMatrix" (outside of their games) they die for real. But let's think about Ralph for a minute here, and who this rule applies to. For starters, Ralph is, quite obviously, the bad guy of his video game, which automatically makes him the boss character of each game. Now consider this: does Ralph rely on a lives system? Of course not, it's not in his programming. In fact, the only one we see lose a life in the game is Felix, and this makes sense because he's the playable character. Ralph is thrown off the roof in every game, but it never kills him. In fact, Ralph is never shown to be even capable of being destroyed, because as we cringe in worried anticipation of our favorite wrecker getting wrecked, we overlook just how much damage he's taken, and, conversely, notice how much damage he can deal. Of course he can deal large amounts of damage, it's in his programming to be capable of wrecking whole buildings and surviving their falls, but not ONCE is Ralph ever killed by Felix or any Nicelander in the game. Here's where the FridgeBrilliance comes into play: Ralph is one of the few, if not only video game character capable of surviving in any other game he's in! Based on the simplicity of his programming, Ralph is impervious. He survives Hero's Duty despite barrages of Bugs and Gunfire. He survives various falls and blows in Sugar Rush. Despite the damage he takes, he's not shown to be effected by any of it, and unlike Felix, he wouldn't be capable of fixing his sustained injuries. Ralph manages to do more harm to the environments beyond his own game despite never receiving a serious injury. [[BreakingBad Ralph is not in danger, Troper. Ralph is the danger! A character leaves their game and dies and you think that of Ralph?]] [[FlatNo No.]] [[MundaneMadeAwesome He is the one who wrecks!]] Meanwhile, Ralph is oblivious to it all, convinced of his own possible demise based on warnings that seem to mostly apply to video game characters that are programmed to be capable of dying, be it boss, fighting character or hero. In this sense, Felix took a bigger risk going after Ralph because Felix could actually die! No wonder he panicked in the Nesquicksand!
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