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Heartwarming / Batman (1966)

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Believe it or not, as campy as the show could be, it did manage to squeeze out some little gems.


  • Upon escaping yet again from an over-the-top Death Trap, Batman and Robin have this exchange:
    Robin: Wow, Batman, I actually have to admit that for a moment, I really was scared. I really thought that was the end of us.
    Batman: I was never scared, Robin.
    Robin: Really?
    Batman: No, not once. Have you ever noticed, Robin, that no matter how many traps, no matter how many perilous situations our enemies put us in, we always manage to escape? Have you ever wondered why that is?
    Robin: Because we're smarter than they are!
    Batman: I prefer to believe it's because... our hearts are pure.
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  • At the end of each King Tut episode, there would be Professor McElroy's timid confusion and regret as he revived from a bout as King Tut (as well as Batman's genuine sympathy for the good professor). Fans of the series often forget that Victor Buono was a talented dramatic actor as well as a comedic actor, and he usually put his dramatic prowess to use for those few moments as Professor McElroy, all the more jarring for the contrast.
  • In "Batman's Anniversary/A Riddling Controversy," Professor Charm gets three million dollars the Riddler steals from charities to develop research, angry that his past as a high school dropout prevents the Gotham Science Board from granting him membership. At the end of the story, Charm returns the cash to police headquarters, admitting he can't live with the guilt of taking money meant for starving children. He's stunned when Batman says that, thanks to Bruce Wayne, the Gotham Science Board will give Charm membership after he finishes his jail term.
    Charm: Remarkable man. Do you know who he is, under the mask?
    Gordon: To us, Professor, who he is is nowhere near as important as where he is. At all times.
    • The episodes even help demonstrate the sheer love the people of Gotham hold for Batman, and vice versa. Gordon and O'Hara surprise Batman with an anniversary party. And the Caped Crusader is nearly in tears he's so touched. Even better, the party reveals that they've gathered $200,000 to donate to Batman's favorite charity. And that's just the first Batman anniversary party that the Riddler chooses to steal from.
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  • Even though the series from the 60's was campy, it had a genuinely sweet moment. When a villainess (played by Zsa Zsa Gabor) assumed that Robin must be Batman's son, Batman stated that though Robin was not his son, he would be proud to call him such.
  • "they may be salvaged". This line gives another reason for why Batman doesn't kill. It's not because he's afraid of Jumping Off the Slippery Slope, It's not because he wants them to go to prison. It's because he hopes that they can reform.
  • In the episode featuring Louie the Lilac (played by Milton Berle), Batman and Robin come to sympathize with the hippies who are camping out in Gotham Central Park. Considering a lot of mainstream television of the time took shots at hippies on a regular basis, having Batman of all shows be sympathetic to them means a lot.
    Batman: Please be gentle with your visitors, Commissioner. Although it may not be understood by more literal minds, in their own way they’re doing what they can to correct the world’s woes with love and flowers.
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  • This exchange between Batman and a young boy:
    Andy: I want to be like you! A caped crime-fighter!
    Batman: Being a hero or a crime-fighter isn’t what counts the most, Andy. It’s being a good citizen. And if that’s what you meant, that is the highest compliment you could pay me.
  • Once Adam West passed away, the show's batsymbol was projected on Los Angeles' city hall. Hundreds of people came to see this. Some have even started a petition to get a bronze statue of West's Batman erected on his birth town.
  • In essence, Adam West's entire career could be one. He acted his heart out playing a beloved character on a wildly popular TV show in the 60s, but afterwards couldn't find work because people thought he was over-the-top, because of that very role he was so famous for. It wasn't until the 90s that he was able to get some recognition, from a tiny cameo role in an episode of 'Batman: The Animated Series', where people began to realise the difficulty he'd suffered from the role. Finally in the 2000s, 'Batman 66' became a thing, with DVD releases of the show and it's tie-in movie, action figures of the characters, even Lego sets and, subsequently, an entire portion of 'Lego Batman 3' being devoted to Adam West's version of the character. It took a while, but Adam West's Batman has gone on to become one of the most fondly remembered of all time.

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