Video Game / Joe Dever's Lone Wolf

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A videogame spin off of the Lone Wolf series of Gamebooks by Joe Dever. The game combines the Gamebook genre of written narrative and multiple choice puzzle with a combat system using Combatant Cooldown System and Quick Time Events. The game was released in an Episodic Game format for IOS and Android, and in a single release for Steam.

The game is set somewhere during the Kai era, after the events of the 2nd book Fire on the Water. You play once more as Lone Wolf, last of the Kai lords. Lone Wolf has recently triumphed over the Dark Lord leader Zargana, using the Sommerswerd. He has thus been granted liegedom over a stretch of land of Sommerlund by the king. News soon reaches Lone Wolf that a village named Rockstarn under his protection has been attacked, and Lone Wolf sets out to rescue the survivors and find the reason behind the attack.

The story is penned by Joe Dever himself, and written exclusively for the videogame, not an adaptation of any book. Dever himself also voices the intro.

The game's website is located here.

The game provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Action Girl: Leandra for part of the game.
  • Action Survivor: Leandra, who has been pretty much surviving alone since the attack.
  • Adaptation Dye-Job: Lone Wolf is depicted as blond on the cover of Rune War and in the text of Trail of the Wolf, but he's black haired in this game.
  • Animal Motifs: Lone Wolf has one, in the form of a recurring Alpha wolf. He mentions the link himself - like the wolf, he is beholden to protect his subjects.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: If solving puzzles is not your thing, picking the "6th sense" Kai Discipline will give you the answer for Shianti Cube puzzles immediately. Of course, the game doesn't tell you that from the beginning.
  • Automatic Crossbows: Leandra's invention and weapon of choice.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: At the end of chapter 3, Lone Wolf is trapped in a dream where he fights his dark counterpart.
  • Big Bad: Warlord Gunzar
  • Bigger Bad: Darklord Haakon, who only sort of shows up at the end and doesn't really get involved in anything (but then, it does have to save him for the fifth book).
  • Blessed with Suck: Vann and Gunn, whom you meet in chapter 3, are trapped in the Crystal Chamber of Shianti Temple. They can potentially live forever without food, water or sleep, but getting too far away from the chamber will kill them.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: The Gourgaz. Big, mean reptiles with a ton of HP who attack three times per round for asinine damage, are immune to crowd control effects (so you can't prevent them from doing said damage) and can buff their underlings, removing crowd control from them in the process. They will make your life hell in multi-stage battles.
  • Bow and Sword, in Accord: One of the possible equipment setups for Lone Wolf.
  • Breakable Weapons: All weapons and armor have a durability rating that go down with use. While they don't exactly "break", their stats are lowered to the point of being useless.
  • Canine Companion: Lone Wolf can summon one during battles, using the "Animal Kinship" Kai Discipline.
    • Warlord Gunzar and some Dhak can summon Doomwolves.
  • Cast from Hit Points: Lone Wolf can sacrifice some of his Vitality to attack enemies when his Endurance runs out mid-combo.
  • Choose Your Own Adventure: In the reading portion of the game, the player is continually faced with problems and has to pick a solution. Choices either weaken enemies, help you avoid fights altogether, or put you in even more troubles. Some have more long lasting consequences, such as determining whether an NPC die or live to help you later.
    • I Shall Taunt You: Taunting enemies to cause them to break ranks or run into traps.
    • Leeroy Jenkins: Rushing in battles head first to surprise or intimidate enemies.
    • Stealth Expert: With the appropriate skill, you can avoid fights or sneak up for a surprise attack.
  • Climbing Climax: The final chapter sees Lone Wolf makes his way up the Dark Tower to retrieve the McGuffin. The final battle, appropriately enough, takes place atop the Dark Tower.
  • Combatant Cooldown System: A variation. There is no distinct turn for hero and enemies. Lone Wolf's time is represented by a bar which reduced very quickly. When it is depleted, he has to wait until it fills completely to act again. Enemies have their own time bars and can attack when theirs are full, regardless of the hero's bar.
  • Cool Down: Every attack and spell has one. The Sommerswerd has a universal cooldown that affects all of its attacks (meaning you can't use two different attacks consecutively)
  • Cooldown Manipulation: A Stun attack makes a combatant lose his turn, and his time bar stops filling. At least that's how it works with Lone Wolf.
  • Cool Sword: The Sommerswerd (Summer sword), Lone Wolf's signature weapon.
    • BFS: It's a large two handed magical sword.
    • Flaming Sword: When it's being charged for an attack.
    • Sword Beam: It can be focused on an enemy or swept horizontally for a room-clearing move.
    • Finishing Move: There are at least 5 different animations for executing an enemy with the sword, burning them up like vampires in sunlight.
  • Cycle of Hurting: If you are unlucky enough, you can get stunned repeatedly by enemy attacks and die without getting a hit in.
  • Damsel in Distress: Leandra, especially in the last act.
  • Dirty Coward: Darklord Haakon leaves all of the fighting to Gunzar in the final showdown since he's afraid of being within striking distance of the Sommerswerd, one of the only things that can slay a Darklord. His fear is well justified, considering Sommerswerd's capable of emitting Sword Beam as well (they also had to save him for the books, where he's brave enough to take on Lone Wolf himself).
  • Dual Wield: Lone Wolf can do this if he trades his shield for a secondary weapon. Unusual for this trope, he cannot use both weapon for a combo attack. The offhand weapon is used either to parry or to cause Standard Status Effects like Stun or Bleeding. Several Dhakkarim do this too.
  • Early Game Hell: The game is much harder at the beginning. As the game goes on, Lone Wolf's stats and equipment become better, which gives you more wiggle room and makes the battles more forgiving.
  • Escort Mission / You Shall Not Pass: Lone Wolf needs to protect Leandra while she does repair to an elevator in the open from subsequent waves of enemies.
  • Episodic Game: The game is separated into four acts. The PC release combines them all.
  • Fantasy Metals: Bronin. The higher-tiered weapons in the game is made from this metal.
  • Faux Action Girl: Leandra does a good job shredding some Mooks in the early game, but spends the rest of it getting kidnapped, captured, or staying out of the way when the menfolk fight.
  • Finishing Move: Lone Wolf has the option of performing one on the last enemy slain during a battle, or particularly strong enemies, using the Sommerswerd to deal the finishing blow. This refills his Kai power.
  • Flechette Storm: One type of ranged weapons available is throwing daggers.
  • For Science!: The Shianti Temple has, among other things, a very big laboratory where they perform less than humane experience on their test subjects.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation: The Codex warns that using the Sommerswerd will draw enemies to the user "like moths to a flame", but it has no such effect in-game.
  • Genius Bruiser: Leandra. A reasonably capable fighter and a crackshot with her crossbow, she is also a skilled inventor and mechanic, even better than her father.
  • Guys Smash, Girls Shoot: Lone Wolf and Leandra, when they briefly fight together.
  • Healing Hands: The Healing discipline allows Lone Wolf to do this.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: Food is a type of restorative item in this game, unlike in the books where food just keeps you from getting weaker through hunger.
  • Item Crafting: Present in the game in the form of upgrades to Lone Wolf's gear.
  • Large and in Charge: Warlord Gunzar is HUGE compared to regular Dhakkarim.
  • Level Up Fill Up: After completing an Act, Lone Wolf's stats receives a boost, and his Vitality, Endurance and Kai power are restored.
  • Life Drinker: The Survival discipline allows Lone Wolf to do this.
  • MacGuffin:
  • Magic Knight: Lone Wolf. He is mainly a fighter, but knows several support spells. The Vordaks, who master a variety of destructive spells and wield a massive mace in battle, can also be considered this.
  • Mana Drain: Sort of. Killing enemies restores some Kai Power. Executing them with Sommerswerd restores a much larger amount.
  • Mind Rape: The "Mind Blast" attack is basically this.
  • Money Grinding: From Act 2 of Chapter II, the player can make use of Random Encounters to kill enemies for loot and money.
  • Mook Chivalry: Lone Wolf never has to fight more than 3 enemies at a time, because of the game engine. In large battles, enemies always come in waves of 3.
  • Nintendo Hard: Being a Lone Wolf game, this has to be expected. There is no *Non-Standard Game Over*, but battles can be incredibly difficult, even at "normal" difficulty. Your resources are limited, and they drain out pretty fast. Starting a battle with your meters partially empty, or even bringing the wrong items, might force you to reload a previous save.
  • No Hero Discount: Each chapter has at least one place where Lone Wolf can buy equipment. In the first and second chapter, it is pointed out that Lone Wolf insists on paying for the items, because the village in his care just barely survived a Giak attack and needs every supply they can get. Later on, however, the "merchants" available become more and more ridiculous. In chapter 3, he trades with Vann, a man who's trapped in Crystal Chamber with no chance to escape, and in chapter 4, with an imprisoned and tortured blacksmith that has gone insane. He still has to pay full price for everything, and the game just stops trying to explain.
  • No One Gets Left Behind: Can be invoked if the player refuses to take the elevator without Leandra.
  • Peninsula of Power Leveling: In chapter 2, the area below Rockstarn Village, south of the Great Chasm. Enemies are plentiful and are comfortably beatable. You have easy access to 2 human camps, so it's trivial to heal and sell off unwanted stuff.
  • Plot Coupon: In the first chapter, Lone Wolf has to find components to fix the elevator and pursue the enemy.
  • Power Crystal: The Shianti Cubes can act as Power Source to power Shianti-made machineries. Or a really destructive hand grenade.
  • Powered by a Forsaken Child: The Shianti Cubes, each contains a soul.
  • Power Glows: Lone Wolf's eyes glow briefly when he uses a Kai power or the Sommerswerd. The Sommerswerd glows when in use. As do regular weapons empowered by Lone Wolf's Weapon Mastery discipline. The Shianti Cubes as well.
  • Press X to Not Die: Most of the game's combat is this.
  • Psychic Powers: The Mindblast/Mindshield disciplines, and the Sixth Sense discipline.
  • Point of No Return: After the first chapter, the first area is closed off completely.
  • Random Encounters: When Lone Wolf moves from one location to another, he can randomly get ambushed on the way.
  • Rapid Aging: Happens to Gunn, see Blessed with Suck above.
  • Spread Shot: Lone Wolf can accomplish this with throwing knives.
  • Standard Status Effects: Lone Wolf can Stun enemies, set them on fire, poison them, disarm them, incapacitate them. Vordak can use the "Silence" move to prevent Lone Wolf from using spells.
  • Stat Grinding: Although Lone Wolf doesn't gain exp from kills, engaging in combat allows him to level up his weapon skills and Sommerswerd attacks.
  • Storming the Castle: The entire final chapter consists of Lone Wolf storming the Dark Tower.
  • Survivor's Guilt: A curse employed by one of the villains takes advantage of this to force Lone Wolf to face negative manifestations of his feelings of inadequacy and remorse over being the last of the Kai in the form of evil duplicates of himself.
  • Tin Tyrant: Warlord Gunzar
  • Throwing Your Sword Always Works: The execution animation for a Vordak has Lone Wolf throwing the Sommerswerd into the Vordak's gem.
  • Trauma Inn: Lone Wolf can meditate anywhere to fully recover Vitality, Endurance and Kai power. Paying to stay at a human camp has the same effect, but keeps player safe from enemy attacks when resting.
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom: Leandra. Her trying to use the Shianti Cube as power source for her prototype engine is what draws the enemy to the village in the first place.
  • Walking Armory: Lone Wolf carries one primary weapon, one ranged weapon with ammo, the Sommerswerd, and either a shield or a second melee weapon.

Alternative Title(s): Lone Wolf

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