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Intrepid Merchant
Curasias in Shape Quest.

''Sweet to ride forth at evening from the wells
When shadows pass gigantic on the sand,
And softly though the silence beat the bells
Along the Golden Road to Samarkand.

We travel not for trafficking alone:
By hotter winds our fiery hearts are fanned:
For lust of knowing what should not be known
We make the Golden Journey to Samarkand.''
James Elroy Flecker, "The Golden Road to Samarkand"

An Intrepid Merchant is a merchant that goes to the far corners of his world, bravely seeking profit. He is a treasure-hunter but the treasure is not hidden, it is in the bazaar waiting for him after he has crossed the deserts, mountains, seas, or trackless gulfs of space. The chief characteristic of an Intrepid Merchant is that he is both a merchant and an adventurer. He buys and sells like any other trader. The difference is that he goes to far distant markets to find what he is looking for. (May be fond of being In Harm's Way - after all, the more dangerous it is to get at something, the rarer and, therefore, more valuable it's likely to be.)

On the less salubrious side of things, this character type can overlap with being a Privateer or Pirate (where the risk is the original owner fighting back), a smuggler (where the risk is that you're trading illegally), or even a slave trader.

If he ever "retires" (or at least settles in one place), he's likely to become a Merchant Prince on the basis of his earnings.

This trope is Older Than Feudalism, dating back in poetry, folklore and history to at least Sinbad the Sailor, continuing as a staple of adventure fiction until the present day, and finding its way into science-fiction almost as soon as the genre came into existence. It migrated to role-playing games, especially Traveller, in which it is one of the main player character types. Inevitably the Intrepid Trader found new territory to explore in computer games, appearing in Elite and its successors. A common space subtrope of this would be the Space Trucker.

Intrepid Merchants were arguably the foundation of the world's economy, before easy transportation and communication made his kind irrelevant. They still exist in places like Central Asia in which transportation and communication are not easy.

When a whole culture has this as its Hat, it is a Proud Merchant Race .

Examples

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    Anime and Manga 

    Fairy Tales 
  • In the Arabian Nights: Sinbad the sailor.
    • Who was actually based on a real person - a Chinese sailor, and Muslim, who traveled as far as Venice to bring back goods to China - only to have his deeds dashed from all records of Chinese history.

    Film 
  • In Star Wars, Han Solo is one (there's often a lot of overlap with smuggling).

    Literature 
  • In one of Poul Anderson's Polesotechnic League stories, David Falkayn quotes a poem (attributed to "Sanders," one of Anderson's pen names) which describes this sort of character:
    Their topmasts gilt by sunset, though their sails be whipped to rags
    Who raced the wind around the world go reeling home again
    With ivory, apes, and peacocks loaded, memories and brags
    To sell for this high profit: knowing fully they are Men!
  • In Isaac Asimov's Foundation, a subculture of these arose as a Batman Gambit to help spread the Path of Inspiration the titular society used to control its neighbors. Hober Mallow became known as "the Merchant Prince" for being successful enough — at many levels — to change the Foundation's Hat to Proud Merchant Race.
  • Leland Gaunt is an evil version in Needful Things. He shows up in town, sets up shop, and sells "gray objects" that change shape according to the buyer's desires for a pittance and a favor which always sets two unrelated people against each other. In the end, he always winds up selling only one thing: weapons.
  • One of Kipling's most beautiful passages is the beginning of "Ballad of The King's Jest". It describes the arrival of Caravans(or "Kafilas") in "The Market Square of Peshawar Town" and goes on from there to show two Intrepid Merchants telling traveller's tales to one another.
    • Mahbub Ali, an Afghan horse-trader in Kim. Well, if his caravan is ambushed and shot at twice in one season, it's unusual, but not quite shocking.
  • In C. J. Cherryh's Alliance/Union series the Merchanter's Alliance is made up of families of interstellar merchants that formed an alliance and became both a major power and the sole means of commerce for the other two powers.
  • In Tales of the Alhambra Washington Irving describes Spanish muleteers as this and tells how they risked hardship and banditry, as well as how they sang songs about contrabandistas(smugglers)
  • In the H. Rider Haggard stories Alan Quartermain did this as one of his occupations in his backstory, as well as prospecting and ivory hunting.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire has an Intrepid Banker called Tycho Nestoris. When the crumbling central government of Westeros rather bluntly refuses to pay the massive debts it owes the Iron Bank of Braavos (a Merchant City that is something of a Fantasy Counterpart Culture to Renaissance Venice), Nestoris willingly goes into several warzones to negotiate with other claimants to the throne, offering to fund their campaigns in exchange for their promises to honor their debts and the debts of the rulers they hope to replace, and also doing business with anyone else who wishes to make use of his services. When one of the many Proud Warrior Race Guys that inhabit Westeros ask him about what a banker is doing in such dangerous situations, he proudly claims this trope as his explanation.
  • In the Vorkosigan Saga novel Komarr, the noble families of Komarr are described as very successful Intrepid Merchants.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Jang Bogo of the Korean TV epic Emperor of the Sea might do. Of course he is a member of a whole tribe of Intrepid Merchants. Which brings up a point that this can be a narrative theme as well as a character.
  • Mal and his crew from Firefly, though due to the harsh nature of the show, they struggle just to make enough money to get by. "Intrepid" doesn't guarantee "successful".

    Tabletop Games 
  • In Traveller the players are often Free Traders, buying goods (sometimes the illegal kind) on one planet and selling them on another in an attempt to make their ship's mortgage payments.
  • Rogue Traders in the Warhammer 40,000 universe are part merchants, part privateers, and sometimes, part conquistador.
  • Most settings of Dungeons & Dragons aren't nice safe places, be it Spelljammer or Dark Sun — thus there are merchants hauling cargo through anything, and sometimes a sourcebook about them.
  • IntrepidMerchants are among the most likely to go far in the Guild. Among the most notable achievements are how they reacted to the observations of the raksha by making overtures intended to teach them the very concept of commerce, just so that they could have an inroad to trade for their magical items.

    Theatre 
  • The merchants in James Elroy Flecker's play: "Hassan: The Story of Hassan of Baghdad and How he Came to Make the Golden Journey to Samarkand", quoted at the top of this page.

    Video Games 
  • This is a playable class in Ragnarok Online. They (mostly) deal with the economy and are able to generate cash at an increased rate with their Overcharge and Discount skills; they can also employ Pushcarts as a kind of second inventory, and if they have this they can do Vending to sell valuable items to other players. In battle they use axes, and additionally can throw money at the enemy (Mammonite skill).
  • Vega Strike aside of privateers choosing this line of work has Merchant faction ("Interstellar Shipping and Mercantile Guild"); Loading Screen with their advertisement says they even run through blockades.
  • Castlevania 64 you meet a demon salesman called Renon early on in the Villa, who offers to sell you potions and other items. His stock is not very impressive compared to most merchants, but unlike most, his shop can be accessed from anywhere, using magical scrolls, making him somewhat of an asset. However there is a catch. He neglects to mention that spending more than 30,000 gold in his shop equals to selling your soul to the devil (that clause is technically written into the contract, but in a demonic language that humans can't read), in which case Renon will be more than eager to claim his fee when the time comes. (If this happens, you have to fight him as a Bonus Boss, right before you face Dracula and the contract is rendered void if you defeat him.)
  • Might and Magic had a few. One example was in 6, where the best inn in the game, where you could buy 40 units of supplies, was south of a town where you initially had to fly over a few mountains to reach. Not coincidentally, this was located at the fork of two roads, one of which led to Dragonsands (one of the most dangerous parts of the game, with had no inn at all) and the other to Paradise Valley (which did have a town and an inn, but required getting past hordes of dragons and titans to get to.).
  • Suikoden Tierkreis has a whole race of them in the Wanderers. They even travel to different worlds in search of profit. Some of the series allows the player to get into it as well, buying commodities in one region and traveling to the other side of the world to sell it for profit.
  • Secret of Mana and Seiken Densetsu 3 have Neko, a cat person with a pack full of goodies that he will sell for a hefty markup. He tends to show up in the wilderness or in the middle of dungeons, where there's less competition to force his prices down. The well-prepared adventurer seldom has need of his services, but his presence can save your ass if you forgot to stock up before setting out.
  • Resident Evil 4 features The Merchant. He's clearly infected by Los Plagas but seems like a pretty cool guy. Rather than bludgeon Leon's brains out he'd rather earn some cash selling weapons and upgrades to the agent.
    HELLO STRANGER! WHATTAYA BUYIN'?
  • There are several in Fallout 3 - each one is a trader with a pack Brahmin and a bodyguard to take care of Shoplift and Die duties, and they are the only people aside from Raiders, mercenary headhunters and the odd hunter who regularly leave population centres to cross the Wasteland.
  • Roguelikes Nethack and Dungeon Crawl have shops inside the dungeon; Angband merchants play it a little safer, hanging out only in the town atop the dungeon.
  • Final Fantasy XIII-2 has Chocolina, who follows Serah and Noel across different timelines.
  • Melnorme in Star Control. Very useful especially when they come to save your butt if you get stranded in Hyperspace. However, if you do not have credits be prepared for an (un)fair exchange. Even the Melnorme have limits to their intrepidness. They bug out of the galaxy once the Death March begins.
  • Dwarf Fortress, as you may have already guessed, has merchants willing to walk into anything this side of lava to do their business. Just read the Badass Boast of a human merchant prince. And here we thought fish in DF were "too hardcore".
  • Whenever you open trade with far cities in any game of the City Building Series, merchants will travel from all over the world to trade with you, no matter how far you are. If you're about to be invaded, they will even inform you about soldiers on the road or political unrest (depending on the game).
  • Charlieton in Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door is a sleazy merchant who was also a clear case of Adam Smith Hates Your Guts. He usually hangs out in Rogueport, where the stuff he sells is usually worthless junk. However, in the Pit of 100 Trials, he shows up from time to time in certain rooms to sell you various items that may be useful at inflated prices. The lower you go, the more dangerous it gets, and the more likely it is you'll be running out of healing items. He knows this. By the time you get near the bottom, he'll be selling items for twenty times what they'd be worth in a normal shop. Since you're likely to be maxed out in coins yet an inch near death at this point, these items might actually be worthwhile.
  • The Pokémon games always have a PokéMart that sells some of the best items right before Victory Road, and another one right before the spot where you start your battle with the Elite Four. (And you should really spend as much as you can at the first stop, because you'll likely make a fortune battling the trainers on Victory Road.)
    • Nurse Joy is an Intrepid Charity Worker, believe it or not. The Pokémon Centers heal your Pokémon for free, but they're located almost everywhere, even places like the foot of Mt. Silver (located in Gold and Silver, and the remakes of those games.
    • Another example is the souvenir store at the top of Mt. Moon, also found, in Gold, Silver, and the remakes of those games. Lemonade is probably the most economical healing item in the game (heals 80 hp and costs 350 PokéDollars) but you usually have to get if from vending machines one can at a time, so stocking up takes a while. The shop at the top of Mt. Moon is a place you can buy it at bulk. (But you can't use Fly to get to it, and it's closed at night.)
  • One of the Hero Sims in The Sims Medieval is a Merchant, who often has to travel to foreign kingdoms to trade. Since they're Hero Sims, they also have a wide range of quests to embark on.
  • Treasure Hunter G turns the player's party onto this, since you don't earn money from random encounters. The only way to make money is to acquire goods from dungeons to sell, or buy items where they are cheap and take them to where they'll sell for a higher price.
  • The Spyro the Dragon games has Moneybags, a bear that shows up and functions as a Cash Gate, forcing you to pay him in order to progress with the game.
  • The Annas from Fire Emblem, who basically appear in every game not only as the "mascots" but as the ones handling all the Secret Shops. One of them can be recruited as a playable character in Fire Emblem Awakening and even become a Love Interest if she marries the male Avatar; others are seen handling the gates to the Outrealms as well as several other spots in them.
  • Warriv from Diablo II is a merchant who badly needs to go to Lut Gholeim but the path is blocked by monsters, so he hangs around the Rogues's camp while hoping your Player Character can undo the mess. Once you do, he takes you with him in his trip.

    Webcomics 

    Real Life 
  • Marco Polo.
  • Christopher Columbus started out this way but didn't find any markets, so instead decided to set a trend for the Conquistadors who came later.
  • The caravan merchants of the Silk Road in Central Asia were a pretty brave bunch, given that killer sandstorms, greedy local nobles, and bandits were considered normal events along the trail. And that was a good year, when the local nomads weren't on a spree.
  • The Phoenicians were also infamous merchant adventurers, and not averse to a spot of banditry and/or slavery when they thought they could get away with it. In the course of their travels, they popularized the world's first alphabet.
  • Vikings could switch from being Pirates to Intrepid Merchants to being warriors without missing a beat. They could even do that in the same voyage.
  • The whole British Empire was founded and built on this trope. It become The Empire only later - in order to protect the commerce.
  • Before embarking on his religious career, The Prophet Muhammad was one of these. The Quraish tribe that ruled Mecca and of which he was a member organized annual trade caravans to Syria and Yemen—Mecca being roughly halfway between the two—and he participated in these grueling treks across the unforgiving Arabian Desert from a relatively young age. He distinguished himself in the service of his wealthy uncle Abu Talib, and made a reputation as a smart but completely honest businessman; this landed him a job with a wealthy widow named Khadijah, whom he later married. It was not until he was 40, when (according to Islam) he received his mission from God, that he would quit the trading life.


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