Growing With The Audience

You were a kid in The Eighties and grew up watching your favorite Merchandise-Driven cartoon but lost interest as you grew older. Suddenly it's The Nineties, and you're bored, flipping through the channels one day, and what do you see? A Darker and Edgier revamp of the show you used to watch! It's good! You get sucked right into it! Fast forward to the Turn of the Millennium, and you hear news that this show is being adapted into a big budget Live-Action Adaptation. You go into the theaters, and what do you notice? All the other moviegoers are in their 20s like yourself and probably grew up watching the show like you did. This isn't a coincidence; whoever created the show made a decision to gradually increase the target audience's age as its fans grew older. This trope is one of the biggest sources of Old Guard Versus New Blood trouble around. It's absolutely great for the old guard, but the new blood often feels it just isn't the same if they came in late.

For instance, when Degrassi The Next Generation aired, a lot of old-school Degrassi fans wished the show had stuck to the old characters (who were now adults), while the new Degrassi fans were annoyed that adult characters had their own storylines in a Teen Drama. Later, when the Next Generation cast got too old to stay in High School, the producers were stuck either following them to college and on (which didn't really fit the format) or switching to a new bunch of kids (who nobody cared about). The producers did both and satisfied nobody.

Contrast Fleeting Demographic, where the series/franchise switches to a younger audience as the former audience matures.


Examples: