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Exposed Extraterrestrials
The smartest being in the universe can't waste his time wearing pants.

You have intergalactic starships, but you don't have goddamned pants? How does a civilization's evolution just skip over that part?

Works that combine humans with non-human characters will often have the non-humans walking around stark naked (or as close as the Moral Guardians will allow) as they go about their everyday business. Genitals are never shown; at best, these beings might wear a Seashell Bra or Fur Bikini to avoid Squicking their human companions.

While they will seldom mention any discomfort, savvy viewers might wonder how they regulate their body temperature or protect against environmental dangers, especially if they lack fur, feathers, scales, or something comparable. If the topic is raised, it'll usually be justified as either a religious or cultural norm, or Bizarre Alien Biology.

One might also wonder about the lack of pockets, though this might also be an issue for normally dressed humans in some settings. Sometimes the aliens will point out that they have Outgrown Such Silly Superstitions, which might raise more questions about the aforementioned pockets.

Functionally, this helps to emphasize the otherworldly nature of the characters, as it contrasts the awkwardness of undressed humans against the easy comfort of the naked aliens/fairies/demons/whatever. It's also an easy excuse to provide some Fanservice or comedy, though (sadly) almost always averted with Human Aliens.

May be an Innocent Fanservice Girl if the character is a Green-Skinned Space Babe.

Also see Fur Is Clothing, Monster Modesty, Our Nudity Is Different, and Non Humans Lack Attributes. Compare National Geographic Nudity for a concept a little closer to home. Contrast with Little Green Man in a Can.

Examples

    open/close all folders 

    General 
  • Just about every "Grey" and alien ever. In some media, though, they wear skin-tight suits.
  • Even most Little Green Men explore the galaxy naked. However, they may wear skin-thight suits as well.
  • This also applies to most cute aliens, as if not wearing clothing makes them cuter.

    Comic Books 
  • Teen Titans: According to Starfire, Tamaranians don't place much value in clothes (they see nothing inherently unchaste about nudity and they're pretty much Flying Bricks, so Armor Is Useless). This is largely her justification for being both an Innocent Fanservice Girl and Ms. Fanservice.
    • Martian Manhunter's true martian form has no clothes, and he merely shape shifts forms that have clothes..
  • Babe in the second Atari Force series goes around wearing nothing. Justified as he's from a species that grow into mountains, and his "skin" has the consistency of granite.
  • In all of their incarnations, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are seldom seen wearing anything besides their bandanas and weapons, unless it's part of a disguise. Their shell is not of the removable kind.
  • Martinex, of Marvel Comics's Guardians of the Galaxy, is a crystaline alien from the planet Pluto. His body is composed entirely of crystal, and never wears clothes.

    Fan Works 
  • Plan 7 of 9 from Outer Space. Captain Proton tries to arrest an alien abductor for murder, kidnapping, reckless endangerment, and public indecency. "Why do non-humanoid aliens go around without clothes anyway?"
  • Most My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic Human-in-Equestria fanfics feature an inversion, even if it is never mentioned. The (alien) humans almost always wear cloths in a society that only ever wears clothing to formal events, and is otherwise naked 98% of the time.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey, the Station aliens are always naked, despite having furless skin and minimal body hair.
  • E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is another naked hairless alien.
  • The alien family in Mac and Me, until they become American citizens at the end.
  • Star Wars
    • Chewbacca is probably the most well-known example, though he does solve the pocket problem by wearing a Badass Bandolier. He's also covered in enough fur that protection from the elements is a non-issue.
    • Hutts are always shown undressed, despite a lack of natural protective covering. Hutt hides are thick enough to shrug off blaster fire, though.
  • Averted with Paul from the 2011 comedy, who wears cargo pants hiding a Gag Penis.
    Paul: What? This is small where I come from!
  • Almost every alien in Men In Black, save for the ones with a Mobile-Suit Human.
  • The aliens in Signs. justified in that the aliens' natural camouflage would be defeated by clothes.
  • The alien in Super 8. If the alien had any garments, it's possible that they were confiscated for analysis by its human captors.
  • The aliens from Cowboys and Aliens only ever wear their gun-bracelets. It helps that most of their skin is Immune to Bullets, though.
  • The movie version of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe averts the matter of topless centauresses by putting them in (torso-only) armor.
  • David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth

    Literature 
  • Pretty much all the aliens in Animorphs, except for some Yeerk hosts who wear minimal clothes to depict rank or faction. When Elfangor first met humans he was actually freaked out by Loren taking off her shoe, since he had assumed that was her actual foot. Ax has trouble understanding why he has to wear clothing while morphed as a human, and frequently refers to clothes as "artificial skin" and shoes as "artificial hooves."
    • Possibly Justified: When Elfangor asks Loren and Chapman about clothes, Chapman explains they wear them so that they can live in less habitable parts of Earth. The idea puzzles Elfangor, implying Andalites just never bothered to colonize parts of their planet other than the grassy fields they're comfortable in.
  • Lampshaded in one of the Sector General novels, when Dr. Conway muses that he should be able to easily find the Earth Humans among the crowd at the space station's "beach" by the fact that only they would be wearing clothing.
  • The Martians of Edgar Rice Burroughs' John Carter of Mars novels are confirmed nudists, despite the harsh conditions on Barsoom. Dejah Thoris, in her first appearance, is described in these immortal words: "She was as destitute of clothes as the green Martians who accompanied her; indeed, save for her highly wrought ornaments she was entirely naked, nor could any apparel have enhanced the beauty of her perfect and symmetrical figure."
  • In Turtledove's World War series of books, the Race never wears clothes. Their idea of proper attire is to cover themselves with body paint. Somewhat justified in that the planets they had visited before were very, very hot, like their home star. Example: their polar regions on Home (the Race's home world) are famous for going down to sixty degrees Fahrenheit. They are utterly unprepared for Earth's far chillier climate, and suffer greatly in their campaigns in the USSR and America during the winter months.
    • In the follow-up Colonization series, the lack of clothing also causes problems with the Race's subjugation of Muslims, especially once the Colonization Fleet arrives, and females of the Race start to show up (although it's difficult for humans to distinguish Race males from females). One Muslim man asks a couple of Race soldiers (males) why they allow their females (and males too) to walk around naked. After all, aren't their minds constantly busy with thoughts of sex? The soldiers laugh at the notion (they only mate during the females' season and don't think about mating the rest of the year). The Muslim man proceeds to mention how Allah frowns upon such thoughts, and the soldiers casually mention not caring what some fictional deity thinks. The man looks at them in shock and leaves. Violent riots start soon after.
    • By The Sixties, many younger humans (in warmer regions, at least) have started to wear the bare minimum of clothing, prefering Race-style bodypaint. In fact, some wear nothing at all. By the 21st century, it's common to show nudity on TV, and the most popular show on American TV is a gameshow where the assistant is a hot girl named Rita who wears Minoan-style clothing (i.e. fully-exposed breasts), and many women in the audience are also topless (and not all are covered in bodypaint). At the same time, the host of the show is a human-raised lizard named Donald who puts on bodypaint for the show that makes it look like he's wearing a formal suit.
  • Centaurs in Piers Anthony's Xanth series take pride in being nude, they see it as having Outgrown Such Silly Superstitions and generally confirming their superiority to the rest of the world. One side character in one of the books has to take on this attitude after having gone through a transformation in order to be with her Centaur boyfriend, with limited success.
  • Larry Niven's Protectors are transformed humans who've lost their gonads and gained enhanced intelligence. They put as much thought into protecting their groins as you do into protecting your armpits, and largely for the same reasons in addition to their skin already having hardened into a kind of biological armor. However, many of them see the value of carrying things, so they wear multi-pocketed vests.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Alf is smart enough to crack wise with the Tanners, but can't be bothered to put on a pair of pants.
    • Averted in later episodes when starts wearing clothes.
  • Stargate SG-1: The Asgard are highly advanced grey space aliens, but never wear clothes. They quite visibly have no genitalia, since they reproduce through cloning. Lampshaded when both Sheppard and Mitchell first meet them, and their primary concern is if they are supposed to walk around naked.
  • "Grey" aliens in The X-Files have no clothes. Except for the episode "Unnatural", when the Grey is wearing baseball clothing.
  • Odo from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine is technically naked most of the time, but since he's a shapeshifter it looks like he's wearing clothing and it's never really commented on.
  • Slitheen from Doctor Who and The Sarah Jane Adventures, when not in human suits. They even rejoice in their nakedness.
    • The Sea Devils had to be given string vests at the last minute as someone objected to this issue late into production.
  • Cole in Tracker, who had a hard time with clothing, and staying dressed in the beginning, probably related to Cirronians being energy beings.

    Myths & Religion 
  • Most centaurs are depicted as such, not even bothering to get dressed for their hairless human half.
  • Similarly, mermaids are seldom seen wearing anything aside from maybe a Seashell Bra, yet they can dive into deep, cold ocean depths without any concern for their unprotected skin.

    Pinball 
  • The mermaids of Barracora are completely naked, with no visible genitals.

    Video Games 
  • In the indie game Fez, Gomez and all the other characters do not wear any clothing.
  • The character Cosmo from the old MS-DOS game Cosmos Cosmic Adventure.
  • In Spore, you can create an outfit for your creature after the Creature Stage. You do have the option of not giving them clothing but they will be weaker.

    Web Comics 
  • See the centaurs bit above? In Accidental Centaurs, when encountering civilization for the first time, Alex learns at his expense that not covering one's upper half is considered indecent exposure for males too.
  • The Uryuoms from El Goonish Shive, being shapeshifters, can simply "delete" their private parts when not in use. However, none are seen naked outside of Imagine Spots, when it's also specified they do have use for clothing.
  • Jix and other Ambis usually don't wear anything except for occasional battle armor. Leading to several "did you just pull that out of your ass?" comments whenever one draws a gun (canonically they keep things in subspace, just like their extra mass for battle form).

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Roger from American Dad!, when he isn't playing dress-up.
  • Gwen's grandmother in Ben 10: Alien Force. Of course, her entire body is luminescent. This actually seems to be the true form of all Anodites.
    • Most of Ben's alien forms fall under this. Lampshaded in Omniverse where he meets a fully clothed specimen of one of them (with a culturally developed sense of shame) and realizes that form has been completely naked the whole time.
  • Frisky Dingo: Killface, the Villain Protagonist, doesn't wear any clothes and few people seem to mind. His son Simon does wear clothes, making it all the more bizarre. Played with at the last moment of the series, when Killface's family, dressed royally, comes to Earth on their spaceship. His mother gets mad at his lack of clothes.
  • Rivesh Mantilax and Seruba Velak, from the Doctor Who animated serial Dreamland.
  • The Transformers, as a race of living Transforming Mecha, rarely wear clothes... though occasionally they choose to put some on, for whatever reason.
    • Worth noting is that when Transformers do wear clothes, they usually need to ditch them to transform anyways, so it may be one of the rare cases where clothing actually is less practical than nudity.
  • This trope appears amongst several of the various aliens that appear in Wander over Yonder, including the main duo, Wander and Sylvia, who only where accessories that don't really cover anything. Lord Hater, Commander Peepers, and the watchdogs are far more modest though.


Expo LabelSpeculative Fiction TropesExposition Intuition
E.T. Gave Us Wi-FiAlien TropesHigher-Tech Species
Digital BikiniNudity TropesFetal Position Rebirth
Exotic EntreeAdded Alliterative AppealExtracurricular Enthusiast
Bill and Ted's Bogus JourneyImageSource/Live-Action FilmsThe Birdcage

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