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Literature: From Russia with Love
The fifth James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, published in 1957.

Soviet counterintelligence agency SMERSH devises an Evil Plan to enact a devastating blow against the British Secret Service by killing James Bond in most humiliating manner possible. Departs from the formula a little in that the first third of the novel is dedicated to describing the trap from SMERSH's point of view, only switching to Bond's narrative once it's laid.

The novel got made into the second James Bond film.

This novel has the examples of:

  • Abduction Is Love: In his backstory, Darko Kerim abducted a woman, stripped her naked and chained her to his table. When she was given the chance to go free, she chose to stay with him instead.
  • Artistic License - History: Fleming claims that SMERSH was a Soviet intelligence operation, derived from the Russian "Smert' Sphionam", or "Death to Spies." To this extent, he's telling the truth. He, however, goes on to state that SMERSH was still a functioning department of the Soviet intelligence apparatus and gives the agency's address. In reality... 
  • Big Bad: Rosa Klebb with General G as the Bigger Bad.
  • Boisterous Bruiser: Kerim is described to be a big man with lust for life. He even states that he'll propably die from living too much.
  • Bolivian Army Ending: The book ends with a Downer Ending, where Bond has just been poisoned and is passing out from the toxin mid-sentence, giving an impression that Our Hero Is Dead. 40+ books written after this one can attest that it didn't stick.
  • Book Safe: Grant has a gun concealed in a copy of War and Peace, which fires if you press the spine in the right place.
  • Bond Villain Stupidity: In the crucial moment of Kronsteen's carefully laid plan, the assassin "Red" Donovan - an Irishman who hates the English - makes the fatal mistake of engaging in prolonged crowing, boasting and gloating instead of just going ahead with his assigned task of killing Bond. This allows Bond the chance to improvise a desperate last-moment plan which works, enabling him to kill Donovan and use the information which Donovan carelessly revealed in order to catch the senior Soviet operative Rosa Klebb.
  • Chairman of the Brawl: Bond uses a chair to defend himself from Rosa Klebb's poisoned knitting needles, and pins her to a wall with it. She is then captured by his fellow agents, but not before she manages to land a hit on him with a small blade on her shoe, which is also poisoned.
  • Continuity Nod: The deaths of SMERSH agents Le Chiffre, Mr. Big, and Hugo Drax are listed at a meeting between Soviet intelligence officials. Bond's mission involving diamond smuggling is also mentioned.
  • Cyanide Pill: Bond is issued a cyanide pill with his kit. He flushes it down the toilet at the first opportunity.
  • Did Not Get the Girl: Bond is poisoned before any consummation can occur between him and Tatiana.
  • The Dreaded: Various stories surround Rosa Klebb's status as a Torture Technician in the building she works. People feel much safer when she is in her office.
  • Fake Defector: Tatiana was told that her mission was to become one of these to leak false intelligence to the West. Her mission is actually a set up to lure Bond into a situation where SMERSH can kill both of them in a manner that embarrasses the British government.
  • Full-Frontal Assault: Clothing Damage in a fight between two Roma girls gets so bad that they are soon fighting each other naked.
  • Good People Have Good Sex: One of the few cases where Ian Fleming's pop psychology was close to Truth in Television is depicting the Psycho for Hire Red Grant as a homicidal maniac incapable of any kind of arousal except for arguably that he gets from killing.
  • Happy Ending Massage: Narration in the book's opening about Red Grant's masseuse tells that she doesn't go out of her way to do this with her clients, per se, but... it apparently turns out that way a lot. Grant stands out in that (among other things) he doesn't react at all.
  • Internal Reveal: The novel spends nearly half of the text detailing the history of the assassin Red Grant and the decision-making processes of the upper echelons of the Soviet spy machine, before revealing its plan to murder James Bond (using Grant) by luring him with the Fake Defector Tatiana Romanova. The other half is how Bond falls into (and gets out of) the trap.
  • Karma Houdini: There is no mention of anything happening to Kronsteen, either from MI6 for trying to kill one of their agents or from SMERSH for failing.
  • Lunacy: Red Grant, SMERSH's Chief Executioner, has homicidal urges coinciding with the full moon; his SMERSH file categorizes him as a manic-depressive psychopath. In the intro of the novel his wristwatch is described to show the phases of the moon.
  • Never Mess with Granny: Rosa Klebb, the head of SMERSH is a late middle-aged Big Bad who can dish out serious hurt and fights dirty.
  • Obstructive Bureaucrat: One personnel manager in the Secret Service is described to be a very irritating man. His job deals with the mundane paperwork involved in daily life. M picked an irritating man on purpose, because it is explained that every well managed organization has at least one person whose job is to act as a 'lightning rod' for all staff frustration.
  • One-Letter Name: General G.Probably at least partly because of his long surname, Grubozaboyschikov.
  • Pocket Protector: Bond is saved from Red Grant's bullet by his trusty cigarette case.
  • Reading The Enemy's Mail: Bond must collect a Soviet defector from Turkey, who is bringing a cipher machine with her. He has to start a fire in the embassy to cover up the theft.
  • Ready for Lovemaking: Klebb tries to seduce Tatiana by putting on nighties and posing seductively on a sofa, inviting her to come beside her. Tatiana runs away in revulsion.
  • Serious Business: Kronsteen endangers his life by ignoring a message from the head of SMERSH to meet at once, because he has to finish a chess tournament. He justifies his action by claiming security considerations his fans are as dedicated to the game as he is, and would realise he'd only forfeit the match if he was summoned by a powerful government figure.
  • Samus Is a Girl: Fleming goes into detail describing the hideous appearance of Dirty Communist Rosa Klebb, before revealing her gender with the words "She pulled up her skirt and sat down".
  • Smart People Play Chess: Kronsteen, who is a literal chessmaster.
  • Swarm of Rats: Bond and Kerim come by a swarm of rats that takes minutes to pass them by in an underground tunnel.
  • Tricked-Out Shoes: Klebb has small poisoned blade hidden in her shoe.
  • Understatement: General G says in the meeting that if they don't do something to humiliate British intelligence, "There will be ... displeasure."
    • The narrative goes out of its way to clarify that General G picked the vaguest-sounding menacing word possible.


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