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Curb Stomp Battle: Live-Action TV
Memo to Starfleet Headquarters: Please invent shields at earliest opportunity.

  • Babylon 5: This is the normal outcome of an attack by the Shadows against a Younger Race.
    • Oddly enough, the Shadows suffered this every time they faced the Vorlons in battle. The interesting part is the Vorlons were only meant to have been a few million years old, yet the Shadows were billions of years old and stated to be far more advanced. This didn't seem to stop the Vorlons from wiping the floor with the Shadows in every one of their confrontations.
      • It was somewhat implied that the defeats were part of the game the Shadows and Vorlons were playing: the periodic wars are supposed to end with the strongest of the young races driving the Shadows back and being stronger for it. Either or both could easily be using ships well below their capabilities for this reason. The other First Ones ripped through both sides in the last battle, and they weren't even using dedicated warships.
      • While the Shadows were older, the Vorlons had vastly superior military technology— but this didn't matter in the end because their war with the Shadows was ideological. They would never wipe out the Shadows because they needed to prove their own ideology right and have the Shadows acknowledge it, and vice versa. It should be noted that a direct attack by a Vorlon fleet on a Shadow one was seen as "breaking the rules", and Kosh was murdered shortly afterwards as punishment, which Kosh was fully aware would happen when he ordered the attack.
      • Also the Shadows had lost the previous war and a good deal of their forces as a result of Sinclair traveling back in time with Babylon 4. So they had to rebuild their military while the Vorlons got to sit back and let the Younger Races take the beating.
      • Expanded Universe material also stated the Shadows had two types of ships. The first are powerful enough to defeat the Vorlons, but take thousands of years to grow so are only few in number. The second as shown in the series can be grown much quicker, but are weak when compared to the ships of other First Ones.
    • It was also the invariable result of encounters between EarthForce and the Minbari during the Earth-Minbari War. John Sheridan freely admitted that his destruction of the Minbari flagship Black Star was the only victory that Earth had during the conflict.
      • To explain: EarthForce ships could damage the Minbari ones, but only if they hit, and the Minbari not only had vastly superior firepower and weapons range, but also a pesky stealth technology that prevented EarthForce ships from aiming well until very point blank range (most Earth ships didn't survive that long). This is a very accurate recap of the war.
      • For reference, the first Minbari attack against the Earth Alliance lasts all of 12 seconds, and only because the Minbari were kind enough to let the Earth ships get close enough to fire first. Unfortunatley for the Minbari, this also allowed one of the Nova-X prototypes to ram a Sharlin war cruiser, destroying both. Since then the Minbari stopped being gentle, and opened fire from beyond Earth ships' weapons range.
    • When Sheridan takes his fleet of White Stars against Earth Force. He loses a few White Stars, sure, but the Earth Force loses a lot more. It's all but stated that the big reason it wasn't more one-sided is that Sheridan was pulling his punches in the hopes of getting the other side to surrender first.
      • Then the White Stars face off against the prototype Omega-X destroyers, using reverse-engineered Shadow tech. The White Stars destroy the enemy, but most of them are destroyed as well. In fact, it's implied that the only reason this wasn't a Curb-Stomp Battle in the destroyers' favor was because they were rushed into service before their systems were fully completed and tested and also because the crews weren't fully trained to use the new systems.
    • The Centauri attack and bombardment of the Narn homeworld—albeit that the Narn fleet was being decimated by the Shadows (in their normal curb stomp fashion) in another system at the time.
  • Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined): In the Miniseries, the Cylon attack on the Twelve Colonies resulted in the destruction of the Colonial Fleet and the near annihilation of the human race. Averted later as the Cylons repeatedly lose in fleet actions despite their overwhelming power. In one of the skirmishes, thanks to a Cylon defector, the human fleet curb-stomped a Cylon attack fleet by infecting them with their own computer virus.
  • Being Human: On the last episode of season 4 when Annie shows up in full-on Mama Bear mode, shouts "GIVE ME BACK MY FUCKING BABY!!", then promptly curb-stomps many of the old ones singlehandedly, then sacrifices her best friend's baby to save the world.
  • Buffyverse: A surprising number of fights, especially in the early years.
    • The reason for Spike's early popularity could legitimately have been driven by the fact that he was the first to actually come close to taking Buffy out in a straight fight (as opposed to the Master's crazy hypnotic mind powers).
    • The entire battle at the end of Becoming, Part 1, when Drusilla and four hench-vamps attack the library when they know Buffy isn't there. They break Xander's arm, injure Willow badly enough to leave her in a coma, kidnap Giles and kill Kendra, a Slayer. Particularly curbstomp-y on the last one - Drusilla calls off her minions and faces Kendra herself, and takes about 20 seconds to grab her, mesmerise her and cut her throat.
    • In the Wishverse of season 3, Buffy's fight against Xander (despite being the Master's right hand man, he doesn't even land a punch on Buffy before getting staked) and, in the other direction, against the Master (he backhands her once, hard enough to stun her, then immediately snaps her neck).
    • Reintroduced in grand fashion during the fifth season finale. The Dragon had just finished beating down Spike, throwing him from the top of the tower to prevent him from rescuing Dawn from the impending ritual sacrifice. Minutes later, along comes Buffy. The stage is set for a momentous battle, but before the villain could finish saying, "This should be interesting", Buffy walks right past him and shoves him off the tower without seeming to pay him the slightest bit of attention.
    • On the topic of the fifth season; Buffy and Glory's first battle was this, starting with Glory backhanding Buffy across the room. Same with the second fight. It raises the question of why Glory didn't just rip Buffy's head off. The writers threw in a line about her connection to Ben as an in-universe explanation why she's grown so soft. The other explanation being, of course, Buffy so weak in comparison that she didnt really mattered to Glory.
    • The battles against Adam is another fine example. Adam seems to be far superior, until the Scoobies cast a spell that imbues Buffy with all their powers, turning her into the physical manifestation of The Power of Friendship. Curb stomping ensues.
    • Buffy vs The Judge: The Judge is a legendary demon who was defeated the last time by an entire army - most of whom died in the process. If anybody should be on the receiving end of a Curb-Stomp Battle, it's Buffy. Right? Buffy pulls a rocket launcher (stolen from the conveniently easy to break into local Army base), and the "fight" ends before it can even start.
    • Shortly after coming back to life in Season 6, Buffy curb-stomps a demon who was strong enough to casually rip off a vampire's head.
    • Finally, there's that time in "Family", where Buffy finishes a close fight by literally curb-stomping a demon.
    • Season seven has Caleb, who at one point leaves Buffy unconsciously behind after a short battle that only lasted seconds, leaving to the question why he didnt finished her off for good. Earlier in the same season a compareable situation appears with some new type of vampire, though this instance could be explained with Buffy being left for dead.
    • The half-demon twins Nash and Pearl vs a Slayer squad in a flashback in Season 9. The Slayers don't win.
    • It took The Master a few seconds to kill Wishverse Buffy.
    • After becoming a Slaypire, Simone pounds Buffy in a straight-up fight.
    • In Angel, Hamilton had the same skill. In the finale one of Angel's dumber decisions ever was to try and take him on alone, very shortly after he demonstrated his ability to beat down Illyria. He survived only through Connor intervening and Hamilton falling prey to Explaining Your Power to the Enemy.
  • Bully Beatdown: One episode had a bully who was so much of a prick, the host, Jason "Mayhem" Miller, himself stepped into the ring against him. The bully kept talking shit the whole time before the match, even calling Mayhem a wimp. In Round One, Mayhem got the bully to tapout twice in 30 seconds (counting the time it took the bully to get back up). In Round Two, Mayhem toyed with the bully for a while before dropping him 3 times in a row with 3 hits. The whole time Mayhem had a grin on his face.
    • A later episode posed a problem because the bully weighed only 150 lbs: It took a while to find a fighter that small. The diminutive fighter managed to finish both rounds in less than a minute and the bully had to stop in the middle of the post-fight monologue to vomit.
  • Burn Notice: Michael Westen is more than competent when it comes to combat. He knows lots of martial arts and has had to use them a lot. However, show creator Matt Nix and actor Jeffery Donovan like realism. In fact, Donovan has a black belt in karate and has studied aikido and jujitsu besides. So in the first season they had him face off against a bounty hunter. A huge bounty hunter. Even with a home court advantage, Michael cannot win this fight. Westen's narration makes it clear that he can't win, and that it's because the guy is just plain big. In the commentary, Donovan and Nix state that they wanted to show Michael in a fight he couldn't win. Michael tries a choke hold and fails. Michael tries to hit him and fails. The guy's choking Michael when Fi takes him out from behind.
  • Chuck: Ever since Bartowski learned kung fu, fights against the bad guys tend to go this way more often than not.
  • The Crossing: A made-for-TV movie about the Battle of Trenton, depicts The Continentals versus Hungover Hessians this way. Apart from the hungover part, this is Truth in Television—the Continentals had two casualties, and they were from hypothermia.
  • {CSI NY "Exit Strategy. Mac gets stomped by the suspect in the teaser for the ep, despite being a trained Marine, and ends up at gunpoint. He only turns the table when the guy's gun jams.
  • Doctor Who: The first Dalek to appear in the revived series single-handedly kills nearly the entire garrison of the bunker he was imprisoned in.
    Cyberman: Our species are similar, though your design is inelegant.
    Dalek: Daleks have no concept of "elegance".
    Cyberman: This is obvious.
    • But when shots were fired, it was all over for them.
    Cybermen: Daleks be warned! You have declared war upon the Cybermen!
    Dalek: This is not war! This Is Pest Control!
    Cybermen: We have five million Cybermen! How many are you?
    Dalek: Four!
    Cybermen: You would destroy the Cybermen with four Daleks?
    Dalek: We would destroy the Cybermen with one Dalek! You are superior in only one respect!
    Cybermen: What is that?
    Dalek: You are better at dying!
    • Besides, it was five million Cybermen versus four Daleks — you can't blame the Cybermen for miscalculating the odds. It pretty much sounded like usual Dalek arrogance — it just happened to be true.
    • The most spectacular example in the older stories, again with the Cybermen as the victims, took place in "The Five Doctors", in which a whole platoon of Cybermen get viciously slaughtered by something called a Raston Warrior Robot, which had never previously appeared in the show and played no further part in the story.
    • Let us not forget that the Doctor gets one of his own at the end of the Family of Blood storyline: After disguising himself as a human and hiding in 1913 England, the eponymous Family track him down and force a confrontation, hoping to gain immortality by stealing his Time Lord essence. They lose so fast and so decisively they don't even get a fight scene; they each end up with various forms of eternal punishment, to fit their temerity...
    • From The Poison Sky, once UNIT overcomes the Sontaran cordolane signal, the Sontaran "Super Soldiers" are slaughtered by human soldiers with assault rifles.
    • In "Day of the Moon", River Song versus the Silence. She faces an entire roomful of them. And wins.
    • In the classic series during the Fourth Doctor's era, the Doctor and Leela are confronted with a Sontaran soldier. Leela simply asks the Doctor, "How do you kill one?" He explains the probic vent on the back of their neck and ten seconds later she takes it out with an animal call (to make it turn around) and a thrown knife.
  • Dollhouse: In one episode, Hearn (the disgraced handler) is sent to kill Mellie (as far as we know, a helpless civilian). We know the battle will either end with Mellie's death or Ballard getting back just in time to save the day. Then Mellie's trigger is activated, and it's Hearn that gets curbstomped. Literally, against a table.
    There are three flowers in a vase. The third flower is yellow.
  • Happy Endings: Had a non-lethal comedic version. Dave and Max get drunk and decide to confront Bo, the guy whose confession of love caused Alex to leave Dave at the altar. Dave and Bo are actually talking things out peacefully when Max sucker punches Bo, apparently not realizing that all the trophies in Bo's apartment were for martial arts competitions. The next scene consists of Max and Dave getting punched and kicked in the head multiple times.
  • Heroes: This was one of the reasons the season one finale was so lackluster. Multiple-superpowered hero versus multiple superpowered villain was doomed to come down to the quickest draw. Of course, it didn't even get that far. Budget restraints meant there was no money for Sylar's side of the fight. Either that or he was trying to beat Peter down Marquis of Queensbury style which, while stupid, makes about as much sense as the rest of the fight.
  • How I Met Your Mother: Ted loses his only fight ever in this way, but the guy who knocked him out was himself taken down in an Offscreen Moment of Awesome by Marshall.
    Future Ted: Kids, I can't tell you whether fighting is good or bad; and I can't tell you not to do it. I can only give you one piece of advice about fighting: don't get into a fight with your Uncle Marshall. 'Cause that guy's friggin' crazy.
  • Kamen Rider Fourze: Fourze and Meteor assume their Ultimate Forms and they try to double team the Big Bad. They couldn't land one good hit on him the riders end up getting their asses kicked. The Big Bad even knocks them out of their transformations.
    • In Kamen Rider Dragon Knight, Kamen Rider Wrath doesn't participate in fights, he dispenses utter beatdowns. Kicking the crap out of Dragon Knight and Wing Knight in their recently-gained Super Modes has to be the most epic moment of his.
    • Kamen Rider Gaim has several. Zangetsu curbstomps Gaim in episode 4, Kurokage (and pretty much every other Rider) in 11, a group of mooks in episode 12, Baron in 14, and Gaim again in 19. Bravo does it to Baron in episode 7. Kouta, Mitsuzane, and Zack confront a pair of crooks who are using Inves to rob an armored car, and curbstomp said crooks without transforming in episode 21. Kouta's Kachidoki Arms allow him to curbstomp an army of mooks in episode 23, and then New Generation Rider Sigurd's trio of Suika Arms armors in episode 24 and Marika in episode 26. And pretty much every battle involving an Overlord Inves is a curbstomp on their behalf, save for two instances: 26, when Baron is able to match Demushu with his new Lemon Energy Arms, and 32, when Kouta unveils his new Kiwami Arms and utterly decimates Demushu, handing him his first - and last - defeat.
  • Lingo: There is a celebrity episode, in which one team dealt the other an unmatched 500-0 beatdown. I repeat, a celebrity episode. Watch it here.
  • Merlin: In the 1998 series, Merlin (wielding Excalibur) takes on Vortigern, the usurper king of Britain, on a frozen river. Merlin allows Vortigern to attempt one blow, which severs his own blade on Excalibur, and then kills Vortigern by making the ice beneath his feet break open with magic, sending him into the icy water.
  • Merlin: Against anything short of Big Bad material (unless he has to hide his magic, and even then if he's wielding Excalibur). For a hero, he has an utterly enormous body count and a major Papa Wolf complex. If it wasn't for that darn Ban on Magic, the series would be over in ten seconds. Oh, and that one time he found a way around that by disguising himself, he gave one of these to the entire Saxon army. With lightning.
  • Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers: Used this when Tommy first shows up. Tommy could just pwn the other Rangers on his own, of course. But he decides to isolate Jason in Rita's Eldritch Location and take on the other Rangers individually. He also invades the Megazord cockpit. Jason does escape, just in time for Tommy, Goldar, and Scorpina to grow to huge size and destroy the Megazord (conveniently robbed of its solar power by a spell to cause a solar eclipse). Then he gets the Dragonzord, and it goes From Bad to Worse. However, once they destroy the Sword of Darkness, he has his Heel-Face Turn, and like all bad Rangers who would follow, he's rarely a team unto himself again.
    • Speaking of the Power Rangers, one of the big reasons why the Psycho Rangers from Power Rangers in Space are so popular (aside from the evil counterpart factor and visual coolness) is the fact that in their first few appearances, they kicked the crap out of the Space Rangers. In fact, the Psycho Rangers would've more than likely destroyed the Space Rangers had they not been told to stand down, a point made clear by the fact that the Space Rangers are seen collapsing in utter defeat, a sight that wouldn't normally happen to the Power Rangers themselves. Keep in mind that the team included a Red Ranger with presumably years of training and the previous year's Turbo Rangers, so these were not inexperienced fighters. This is justified by the fact that each Psycho Ranger was specifically created to be the perfect counter for the battle style favored by the Space Ranger of their corresponding color. As long as a Psycho Ranger is facing the Space Ranger of the same color one-on-one, it will always be a Curb-Stomp Battle in favor of the Psycho Ranger.
    • In Power Rangers Dino Thunder, Zeltrax vs. Tommy battles are usually even before it is revealed that It's Personal for Zeltrax. After he becomes his rival, he seldom lands a single blow on Tommy, who handles him more easily than a Mook. Even having a Super Mode can't make his final fight with Tommy even enough to be any fun. Why they decided to Nerf him when it became more important that he be able to take him on is a mystery.
    • It is also common in most seasons of Power Rangers for the villain's Dragon to serve as a measuring stick to show how the Rangers are getting progressively stronger over the course of the season. Early in the season, he single-handedly defeats the entire team with ease. By mid-season, the Rangers as a team are evenly matched with The Dragon. By the end of the season, a single Ranger (usually the Red Ranger) soundly defeats The Dragon one-on-one.
    • In the Power Rangers Samurai episode "Return of the Master", Xandred gets pissed enough to leave the ship despite being at risk of dying from drying out in the human world (much faster than the average Nighlok, as per the previous generation's attempt to seal him away for good). He knocks all the Rangers around, even beating Jayden's Super Mode. Such is his rage that Serrator bails rather than face him. (Ironically, though, this all fit Serrator's plans just nicely - he couldn't get Xandred out of the way on his own, but Xandred dried out enough to be sidelined long enough for Serrator's own plan to go through. Hard to know if it's a Xanatos Gambit or luck, though.)
    • In the final battle of Power Rangers Time Force, though, it's Ransik, the Big Bad, who outclasses the Rangers by such a degree that it's not even funny. (Awesome, it is.) How do they beat him? They don't. He stands down when he accidentally hits his daughter, the one person he cares for.
    • In Power Rangers Ninja Storm, Zurgane proves himself one of the strongest The Dragons in franchise history. Pity he hardly ever fights hand to hand. He prefers to fight behind the wheel of a Humongous Mecha that's basically substituting for a Monster of the Week in an episode. The twice he fights them on the ground? Once, he is beating the living crap out of starting three and they only survive because Lothor teleports Zurgane back (he was acting against orders and Lothor didn't want him to attack just yet.) Later, when it's six Rangers... he stomps them worse. Sadly, he suffers Lowered Monster Difficulty when he returns for the Power Rangers Dino Thunder teamup and doesn't stand up to Tommy and the two Thunder Rangers very long (you'd think he'd be able to take on both teams singlehandedly.)
    • Power Rangers Jungle Fury makes this the outcome of any fight involving Dai Shi vs. anyone not RJ. Of course, that's just at first. Then the Rangers get Jungle Master Mode, then Dai Shi gets Zocato, then there are five Rangers and new Zords by this point, then Dai Shi becomes a Phantom Beast, and so forth. It's got as much of an arms race as the one Power Rangers RPM is better known for, just a different flavor.
    • In Power Rangers Super Megaforce, the Rangers are quite cheesed off that the Armada was still attempting to conquer Earth (and were trying to flatten their city with missiles) and end up hauling the Legendary Megazord into space and tearing the fleet a new one without a scratch.
  • In Person of Interest this occurs quite freqently with both Reese and Shaw, highly trained ex-assassins. A larger version occurs with Northern Lights, a secret clandestine government force with access to all those nice toys, versus Vigilance, a group of homegrown terrorists who hate all the invasions of privacy and other moral failings of the government, when they are forced into combat.
  • Professional Wrestling: Prior to the mid-1990s, a typical episode of weekly syndicated professional wrestling programs consisted mainly of curb-stomp battles; these were called squash matches, and were used to establish the pushed wrestler's skill; if he were a bad guy, these matches would also demonstrate how big and bad they were, and what a threat they posed to the lead babyface.
  • Revolution: Episode 11 demonstrates this quite graphically with Monroe's helicopters slaughtering an entire rebel camp while the camp had no time to react.
  • The Sarah Connor Chronicles: There's the FBI raid against Cromartie's apartment in the first season finale. It didn't end well for the FBI.
  • Smallville: The vast majority of villains get one of these at the hands of Clark. Really, most episodes revolve around him having to find out who the villain is and/or figure out how to separate them from their chunk of Kryptonite. Once that's done, everything goes into slow motion, Clark walks up to the motionless bad guy, and takes them down with one punch. Or finger-flick. They've been getting a little better about not doing that, though. In a season one episode, meteor freak Sean Kelvin, who could absorb body heat and project cold beams actually curbed Clark twice without the help of Kryptonite. In their first confrontation, Sean snuck up behind Clark and sucked all of Clark's body heat, leaving Clark unconscious and frozen. Clark recovered, and tracked down Sean for a rematch, only to be curbed again. However, Sean threatened to kill all of Clark's loved ones, which pissed Clark off and sent him into a rage, in which he grabbed Sean and threw him into a lake, which froze once Sean landed in the water.
    • Let's not forget Clark's showdown with General Zod in the season six opener. Zod's a trained soldier, Clark's Strong, but Unskilled: cue Clark getting beaten senseless and tossed around like a beanbag. It's only thanks to an I Surrender, Suckers tha Clark wins this one.
  • The Sopranos: A rare nonlethal literal example occurs in one episode. Tony finds a tooth in his pants leg later.
  • Stargate SG-1: You can't mention the Borg and not talk about the Ori from this show. You had the absurdly powerful Ori ships, but then you had the newly built Earth ships with Asgard tech, and ships from the Jaffa and the Lucian Alliance. Huge buildup to the battle where four Ori ships emerge from the supergate followed by... an EPIC curb stomp by the Ori that made the Federation's defeat by the Borg look close.
    • Those weapons weren't completed until the Asgard were on the brink of extinction, developing them was basically their final act as a race. Don't forget the Asgard sent one of their own ships to that battle, which couldn't make a dent against the Ori either and was presumably destroyed as well.
    • Every single space battle in Stargate is this trope. Asgard stomp Goa'uld by simply disintegrating their damn ships. Tollan one-shot Goa'uld. Goa'uld get better and one-shot Tollan and Asgard. Asgard get better and one-shot Goa'uld. Replicators stomp Asgard. Asgard catch Replicators with their pants down and stomp them. Ancient weapons stomp Anubis. And so on, up to and including the Ori. There is never a battle won by attrition or superior strategy. This is somewhat averted in Stargate Atlantis by the Wraith's inferior technology winning by sheer numbers, but they get into the curb stomp exchange with humanity in the final season too.
      • Most large ships end up simply hanging in space and shooting each other until one of them blows up. Maneuvering almost never happens.
    • In one episode of Stargate Atlantis, a Genii woman has a major grudge against Teyla over the death of her father. When they finally fight, we see a small flaw in her plan — Teyla's technique is far superior to her own. Only her ferocity and Teyla's lack of desire to kill her extended the fight beyond thirty seconds.
    • In Stargate Universe, pretty much every battle Destiny gets into becomes one of these. Of course, not having the ability to steer the thing limits what you can do in a spaceship battle.
    • SGU starts with the Asgard-upgraded Earth ships that can stomp the Ori... getting stomped by Goa'uld ships of the sort we saw back in SG-1's first season. When fans cried "WTF?!", The Powers That Be responded that the rest of the universe hadn't been standing still while Earth improved its tech.
  • Star Trek: The Borg. A single cube has, on two occasions, slaughtered fully-staffed and trained Federation fleets. The first time around, they defeated a fleet of forty ships.
    • Lest we not forget Species 8472 owning the Borg in Star Trek: Voyager.
    • In the Star Trek: The Original Series episode The Doomsday Machine, the eponymous weapon—which shatters and then devours planets for sustenance—devastates the starship Constellation, killing all but one member of its crew. It is a testament to the heartiness Constitution-class that she's not destroyed outright.
    • Enterprise puts the NX-01 through the very epitome of a Curb-Stomp Battle in the episode "Azati Prime", as per the page image. The ship is attacked by four vessels at once and is very nearly destroyed. There's no Reset Button this time - it remains on the brink of falling apart for the rest of the season.
    • A Star Trek example that involves people instead of spacecraft: Kira vs Damar. When he tries to drag Dukat's daughter home, Kira beats him unconscious in less than a minute without him landing a single punch.
    • While they were only holograms, there was the satisfying battle of Klingons beating down Nazis in a Voyager episode.
    • The Battle of the Omarion Nebula. A force of twenty Romulan and Cardassian warships went on a mission to wipe out the Founders, only to be obliterated by a horde of waiting Dommion ships.
    • Later, during the Second Battle of Chin'toka, 311 of 312 Federation, Klingon, and Romulan ships are destroyed by the Breen, using energy dissipators to disable enemy ships and then destroy them while helpless.
    • In the TNG episode Conundrum, the Enterprise effortlessly fights its way past the Lysian fleet and nearly destroys Lysian Central Command with a single photon torpedo. Enterprise stood down when they realized that they had been deceived by an infiltrator from a species that had been at war with the Lysians for decades.
  • Supernatural: Sees this a lot, usually with the Winchesters getting their asses handed to them by the Big Bad.
    • This happens several times with Alastair and Lilith, who pwn humans and angels alike to begin with, only for Sam to eventually kill them with his brain.
    • Anything attempting to take on an archangel ends up burned to dust with a simple touch, or exploded with a snap of the fingers. Even after Castiel gets brought back 'new and improved', Raphael can still kick his ass all over the shop.
    • Lucifer taking on the pagan gods in the fifth season episode Hammer of the Gods. You would think that the mighty mighty pagan gods might put up a little more of a fight than the humans could, but Lucifer slaughters them all without breaking a sweat. And then kills his brother - the archangel Gabriel - just as easily.
    • Depressingly averted in the Season 5 finale. We never get to see even a hint of the epic, world-ending battle between Michael and Lucifer. This was a win in-universe, though, since the curb-stomping in question would have torched the planet.
    • In the Season 6 finale, the final battle between Castiel and Raphael ends up being like that. Amped up on purgatory souls, Castiel merely snaps his fingers and archangel Raphael explodes into bloody goo. The opening episodes of season 7 show him continuing to level effortless Disproportionate Retribution on angels and humans alike.
  • Super Sentai: This trope, of course, also appears in the original series:
    • Like mentioned above in the Power Rangers section, Dragons are also used in Super Sentai to measure the stength of the team.
    • In Juken Sentai Gekiranger, they awesomely used this trope in both directions in a three-parter, in which the heroes fought their rival Rio. In their first battle, they get mercilessly curb-stomped by him, surviving only because their master offered himself as a hostage to buy the heroes some time. But after the heroes achieve their Super Mode, Rio himself gets curb-stomped, resulting in his Villainous Breakdown.
    • In Samurai Sentai Shinkenger, the original counterpart of Power Rangers Samurai, the Big Bad Doukouku decides to enter the surface world. Like Xandred, Doukouku is in danger of dying from drying out. This being Super Sentai, the Curb-stomp battle is a lot more brutal.
    • Mahou Sentai Magiranger - How does MagiKing deal with a particularly annoying Monster of the Week? By grabbing him by the collar and punching him in the face over and over.
  • Survivor: Palau: Almost all the young and physically fit contestants ended up on one tribe while almost all the older and more physically feeble contestants ended up on the other tribe. Guess which tribe ended up losing all the immunity challenges and all but two of the reward challenges? The tribe who...wasn't the most physically able but had a strong teamwork spirit and intelligent leaders who carried their tribe to victory while the more physically strong tribe floundered about with nary a clue about how to strategize or work together.
  • The Tonight Show: Andy Richter vs. Wolf Blitzer on Celebrity Jeopardy!. The score as they were going into Final Jeopardy? Andy, $39,000 and Wolf negative $4,600.
    • While we're on the subject of Jeopardy!, Watson, a thinking computer made by IBM, creamed two human champions of the show.
  • The Unit: Versus anybody. The terrorists who hijacked the plane in the pilot episode got it the worst though.
  • Walker, Texas Ranger: Often in an opening act, the bad guys will mercilessly beat up weaker people they were intending to torment. Even more often, the lead villain in a particular episode will help orchestrate and execute a brutal beating of C.D. Parker in an attempt to intimidate Walker and the Rangers. (It never worked.)
  • The Walking Dead: Shane witnesses Ed hitting Carol and unleashes the mother of all curb stompings on him. Ed later dies in a similarly one-sided confrontation with a Walker.
    • Season 3 gives us a most literal example of a Curb-Stomp Battle with Andrea using a rock to smash a captive walker's teeth out of its mouth.
  • In Arrow, The Dark Archer has beaten Oliver Queen in two fights to date, the first one being an almost fatal curb stomp.
    • Let's just say Ollie has trouble against anyone trained by the League of Assassins one on one.
    • When Deathstroke shows up in season 2 he curbstombs anybody he faces. He is able to take on Oliver, Black Canary and Diggle one after another, beat them down and not even break a sweat.

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