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YMMV: Walking with Dinosaurs
  • Awesome Music: Has its own sub-page.
  • Critical Backlash: From the general scientist/paleontologist community, but mostly from those to whom scientific accuracy is Serious Business and any amount of speculation is intolerable. One such person infamously labeled the show's paleontology consultants "prostitutes" for "selling out" their knowledge to a fancy TV show.
    • Pretty much every critic and their mothers are attacking the 3D movie. Few people are willing to contest them.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: The giant sea reptile Liopleurodon. This show did to him what Jurassic Park did to Velociraptor: make it stock (as well as exaggerate its size).
    • The huge dinosaur Giganotosaurus with its memorable predation upon the gigantic sauropod Argentinosaurus may be counted as another example. It's interesting both Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus (the latter became stock after Jurassic Park III) achieved their popularity in the same year (2001).
    • Gorgon from the 3D film. Partially for being one of the few named characters not to receive an annoying voiceover.
  • Freud Was Right: Because of its shape, the Late Permian lake has been nicknamed Penis Lake.
  • It Was His Sled: Spoiler alert—The K-Pg extinction happens!
  • Memetic Badass: Liopleurodon.
  • Most Annoying Sound: "Anatotitan"'s "roar" (it does sound like they're saying the word "roar").
    • The decision to give some of the characters in the 3D movie voices ruined the movie for most people.
  • Narm: In Walking With Monsters. For all its hunting prowess and deadliness, the famous crested mammal-ancestor Dimetrodon looks pretty damn goofy when it's running.
    • The sensationalist narration making it seem like we are at war with other creatures is pretty cheesy.
    • Justified in the fact that every land vertebrate at that time period ran more or less like that, and the 10-feet one was likely to outrun everything else. And its following evolutionary stage (the gorgonopsid) loses its "clumsiness" altogether.
    • The final fate of the tyrannosaurid family at the end of "Death of a Dynasty" rather comically clashes with the grimness of the scene. To elaborate: The mother died from her leg wound, with the surviving infants clustering around her body. Then the meteor shockwave hits. The babies get suck up by the wind and zoom away, followed by the mother's corpse being lazily dragged after them.
    • ALL of the dialogue in the 3D film.
  • One-Scene Wonder: The Gigantopithecus.
    • Plateosaurus.
    • Stegosaurus.
    • Plesiopleurodon.
    • Ankylosaurus. Narrowly averted, as they have a small introduction early on.
    • Quetzalcoatlus.
    • Deinosuchus.
    • Titanomyrma.
    • The woolly rhinoceros.
  • Special Effect Failure: Even these shows weren't immune to this: the most common goofs are CG clipping errors (like when the mammoth's trunk "merges" with its tusk), wires from the animatronic models or parts of the people controlling them being visible, and shadow/reflection effects being messed up. Some are obvious, others you only catch if you watch the clips frame-by-frame.
    • Walking with Monsters suffers from some particularly bad-looking CGI composition. A lot of times, animals either clip into the scenery, their shadows rarely correspond to the irregularities or the color of the ground, and in some shots, they are cropped a little bit too far from the screen's edge (like this poor fish), so you can even see parts of the background "through" them.note 
    • The film has no lip synching, leading to speculation that it was supposed to be a serious documentary and was changed to a comedic film a la Ice Age at last minute, because Viewers Are Morons. Cue outcry of They Changed It, Now It Sucks.
    • The animals in the earlier series often suffered from weird clipping and deformation. Sometimes during motion, their skin-textures would overlap and clip through each other near the joints, creating odd-looking "seams". There were also some rigging problems evident, like the shoulder-spikes of Polacanthus moving separately from its skin, or the upper teeth of the Diplodocus stretching when they open their mouth in a couple of shots. These issues were gradually ironed out as the series progressed.
  • So Bad, It's Good: Arguably the 2013 movie, with its inept childish dialogue, over-the-top cliché plot and gratuitous sexism. Others just see it as horrible, though.
  • The Scrappy: Juniper, from the 2013 movie, is considered a bizarre Gender Scrappy for being a Flat Character and evident of the gratuitous sexism the movie shows.
    • Alex the Alexornis from the same movie is a bizzare example of a Reverse Scrappy, being one of the only characters who isn't considered annoying and stupid. Being voiced by John Leguizamo certainly helped.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Many a dinosaur fan and Walking with Dinosaurs fan have complained about the 2013 movie humanizing the animals too much.
  • They Just Didn't Care: The NetFlix episode summaries screw up a lot. By which claiming that "Giant of the Skies" centered on Archaeopteryx, promising "mammoth ichthyosaurs" (if by "mammoth" one means "dolphin-sized") and "marine crocodiles" for "Cruel Sea", and claiming that "Death of a Dynasty" was an examination of an unanswered query about the extinction of the dinosaurs, rather than it being a plain depiction of a giant meteorite killing them all after a considerable decline from volcanic activity.
    • Chased By Dinosaurs has the famous flying reptile Pteranodon living in the the earliest part of the Late Cretaceous (it really lived roughly in the middle) and in South America instead of North America. It was literally in the wrong place at the wrong time.
    • The Complete Guide cites Carnosauria as "an ill-defined collection of theropods, whose evolutionary relationships are much contested by scientists." This hasn't been the case since The Nineties at latest. Carnosauria is actually pretty well-defined and has been since the mid-nineties.
    • The 2013 installment is not even a documentary, just Spirit with dinosaurs.
    • The franchise's handling in Hungary. Nearly all of the shows and specials have multiple dubs inconsistent with each other and containing numerous translation errors. WWD itself has two titles that alternate depending on which medium you're looking at. The supposedly 4-disk DVD set only has 3: on the WWD disk, the audio is out of sync by a full second and features some atrocious sound-editing. The Chased by Dinosaurs DVD is missing the interviews described on its case, and instead has dinosaur fact-files, most of which are written in English, but one is French (the heck?), and sport several spelling mistakes. The books have been published by multiple companies, and again have inconsistent translations. Further, they are ripe with obvious misspellings and editing errors, such as entire chunks of text simply missing or ending mid-sentence.
    • The Netflix summaries have mostly been fixed. Giant of the Skies is now about pterosaurs and Death of a Dynasty is just described as showing the extinction of the dinosaurs, but Cruel Sea still promises "mammoth ichthyosaurs" and "supersized crocodiles".
  • Ugly Cute: Oh so many examples.
    • The cynodonts from "New Blood", and their babies for that matter. They're like little, half-bald puppies.
    • The baby Diplodocus from "Time of the Titans". At certain points, they even sound like human babies! And rather than being creepy, the effect is downright adorable.
    • The Cryptoclidus and baby Opthalmosaurus in "Cruel Sea". The former is basically a Jurassic seal and the latter is essentially a Jurassic dolphin.
    • The Tapejara from "Giant of the Skies" and pretty much every pterosaur in the series. The fact that pterosaurs were this in real life certainly helps.
    • The Leaellynasaura from "Spirits of the Ice Forest". All of them.
    • And finally, the baby Tyrannosaurus from "Death of a Dynasty". Especially the runt of the litter.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Its visual effects are among the most impressive in any TV series ever, period.
    • Special mention must go to Sea Monsters. It features pre-historic creatures underwater and interacting with Nigel.
    • The arena spectacular for the sheer spectacle of seeing life-sized dinosaurs live in front of you.
    • Although the WWD movie got mostly negative and mixed reviews, the visuals have impressed mostly everyone, whether it's just the CGI or the 3D effects as well. The bulk of the critics single them (as well as John Leguizamo's "spirited way with words") out as the sole saving graces of the film.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: The series arguably was destined to a general public including both adults and children: however, for some people who watched it during childhood, several parts of the Walking With series are nothing but a long, endless sequence of Nightmare Fuel-related stuff. Arguably, talking about prehistory in a more reassuring way "will never be allowed" in TV. And the book "A Natural History" doesn't exactly better the situation, either.
    • The feature-length WWD film shouldn't escape mention. While light-hearted and anthropomorphized compared to the original mini-series, a few moments still qualify as rather frightening. The forest fire, and the death of Bulldust the Pachyrhinosaurus at the hands of the Gorgosaurus pack, both stand out. And the way Pachyrhinosaurus protagonist Patchi, having lost both love interest Juniper and the respect of his brother Scowler, just accepts his fate of being eaten alive by scavenging Troodons and azhdarchids is both downright terrifying and depressing.
  • The Woobie: Tyrannosaurus rex.
    • The old Ornithocheirus too. He risked his life flying all the way to his old mating grounds, is driven away the minute he gets there, and dies of exhaustion without managing to mate at all.

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