YMMV / Walking with Dinosaurs

  • Awesome Music: Has its own subpage.
  • Angst? What Angst?: The deaths of Patchi and Scowler's entire family in the 2013 movie. By the next morning, they're done mourning their father, and the loss of their mother and siblings is never even mentioned.
  • Author's Saving Throw: The powers that be seemed to have realized what a misstep the voiceovers for the 2013 film were, because now they're going to re-release the film (at least in the UK at an unknown time) without the voiceovers. Even better, Benedict Cumberbatch is going to narrate!
  • Better on DVD: For those who disliked the childish dialogue in the 3D movie, at least. The Blu-ray release has the "Cretaceous Cut", which eliminates it completely.
  • Critical Backlash:
    • From the general scientist/paleontologist community, but mostly from those to whom scientific accuracy is Serious Business and any amount of speculation is intolerable. One such person infamously labeled the show's paleontology consultants "prostitutes" for "selling out" their knowledge to a fancy TV show.
    • Pretty much every critic and their mothers are attacking the 3D movie. Few people are willing to contest them.
  • Designated Villain:
    • Of the 3D movie, Gorgon. He's treated as the main villain, and yet just a predator trying to survive and feed his pack. Probably justified, though, as the story is told from the point of view of his prey.
    • The arthropods in Monsters. Whereas predators in other instalments are portrayed as Non Malicious Monsters who are only villains because we see things from the perspective of their prey (or aren't villains at all, in some cases), the narrator in Monsters paints the predators of human ancestors as though they're vicious, evil, malevolent brutes who are waging some kind of "war on vertebrates". This is even though, like the "villains" of Dinosaurs and Beasts, the arthropods are just regular animals doing what they have to do to survive.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • The giant sea reptile Liopleurodon. This show did to him what Jurassic Park did to Velociraptor: make it stock (as well as exaggerate its size).
    • The huge dinosaur Giganotosaurus with its memorable predation upon the gigantic sauropod Argentinosaurus may be counted as another example. It's interesting both Giganotosaurus and Spinosaurus (the latter became stock after Jurassic Park III) achieved their popularity in the same year (2001).
    • While they didn't become stock, Ornithocheirus and Tapejara became fan favorites after this show and were given more attention in educational dinosaur books. The Ornithocheirus character became particularly popular due to the tragic outcome of his story.
    • Gorgon from the 3D film. Partially for being one of the few named characters not to receive an annoying voiceover.
    • Although for characters that do have a voiceover Alex has some popularity with the viewers, considering him to be less annoying than the others and he even does a Moment of Awesome.
    • The Terrible Trio of Azhdarchids from the 3D movie, due to their slapstick and strange adorableness.
  • Even Better Sequel: Beasts and Monsters got even more acclaim and have aged significantly better than Dinosaurs.
  • Evil Is Cool: Not that any of the characters are actually evil, but a lot of the predators which fill the role of villains are quite cool.
  • Freud Was Right: Because of its shape, the Late Permian lake has been nicknamed Penis Lake.
  • Hell Is That Noise: The dying screeches of the dominant Leaellynasaura as it's killed by the Allosaurus in episode 5. Holy shit. It's arguably even worse by how abruptly it cuts off, followed by the plop of its mangled carcass falling to the ground.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The dromaeosaurid from "Death of a Dynasty" was seen as an example of Anachronism Stew, as Dromaeosaurus (what the animal was called during production despite its flaws) was extinct by the K/Pg extinction. Skip ahead to 2015, and a dromaeosaur just the right size to match with this creature was discovered in the exact formation the episode takes place in (Dakotaraptor).
    • The "Cruel Sea" opening reminds people of the ending to Jurassic World.
  • It Was His Sled: Spoiler alert—The K-Pg extinction happens!
  • Memetic Badass: Liopleurodon.
  • Most Annoying Sound: "Anatotitan"'s "roar" (it does sound like they're saying the word "roar").
    • The decision to give some of the characters in the 3D movie voices ruined the movie for most people.
  • Narm: In Walking With Monsters. For all its hunting prowess and deadliness, the famous crested mammal-ancestor Dimetrodon looks pretty damn goofy when it's running.
    • The sensationalist narration making it seem like we are at war with other creatures is pretty cheesy.
    • Justified in the fact that every land vertebrate at that time period ran more or less like that, and the 10-feet one was likely to outrun everything else. And its following evolutionary stage (the gorgonopsid) loses its "clumsiness" altogether and gallops after prey at high speeds, which it would have done in Real Life.
    • The final fate of the tyrannosaurid family at the end of "Death of a Dynasty" rather comically clashes with the grimness of the scene. To elaborate: The mother died from her leg wound, with the surviving infants clustering around her body. Then the meteor shockwave hits. The babies get suck up by the wind and zoom away, followed by the mother's corpse being lazily dragged after them.
    • ALL of the dialogue in the 3D film.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: In contrast to the 3D film, the video game is much better received.
  • One-Scene Wonder: The Gigantopithecus.
    • Plateosaurus.
    • Stegosaurus.
    • Plesiopleurodon.
    • Ankylosaurus. Narrowly averted, as they have a small introduction early on.
    • Quetzalcoatlus.
    • Deinosuchus.
    • Titanomyrma.
    • The woolly rhinoceros.
  • Signature Scene:
    • The arrival of the herd of Plateosaurus.
    • The long shots of the Diplodocus herd.
    • The Allosaurus pair attacking the canyon.
    • The Liopleurodon snatching the Eustreptospondlyus is easily the most memorable moment of the entire franchise.
    • The Utahraptor hunt.
    • The death of the Ornithocheirus.
    • The extinction of the dinosaurs.
    • The Diplodocus hunt in The Ballad of Big Al.
    • The gas cloud sweeping the forest.
    • The Brontothere mother fighting the Andrewsarchus.
    • The introduction to the wild plains with the adult Indricotheres.
    • Half-Tooth fighting the invading brothers.
    • The Smilodon pack hunting.
    • The great mammoth migration, culminating in the Neanderthals attacking them at night with fire.
  • Special Effect Failure: Even these shows weren't immune to this: the most common goofs are CG clipping errors (like when the mammoth's trunk "merges" with its tusk), wires from the animatronic models or parts of the people controlling them being visible, and shadow/reflection effects being messed up. Some are obvious, others you only catch if you watch the clips frame-by-frame.
    • Walking with Monsters suffers from some particularly bad-looking CGI composition. A lot of times, animals either clip into the scenery, their shadows rarely correspond to the irregularities or the color of the ground, and in some shots, they are cropped a little bit too far from the screen's edge (like this poor fish), so you can even see parts of the background "through" them.note 
    • The film has no lip synching, leading to speculation that it was supposed to be a serious documentary and was changed to a comedic film a la Ice Age at last minute. Cue outcry of They Changed It, Now It Sucks.
    • The animals in the earlier series often suffered from weird clipping and deformation. Sometimes during motion, their skin-textures would overlap and clip through each other near the joints, creating odd-looking "seams". There were also some rigging problems evident, like the shoulder-spikes of Polacanthus moving separately from its skin, or the upper teeth of the Diplodocus stretching when they open their mouth in a couple of shots. These issues were gradually ironed out as the series progressed.
  • So Bad, It's Good: Arguably the 2013 movie, with its inept childish dialogue, over-the-top cliché plot and gratuitous sexism. Others just see it as horrible, though.
  • The Scrappy: Juniper, from the 2013 movie, is considered a bizarre Gender Scrappy for being a Flat Character and evident of the gratuitous sexism the movie shows.
    • Alex the Alexornis from the same movie is a bizzare example of a Reverse Scrappy, being one of the only characters who isn't nigh-universally considered annoying and stupid. Being voiced by John Leguizamo certainly helped.
    • Hell, the whole damn 2013 movie could be counted as this, it's just we don't have a category for films.
  • Squick: Early on in the 2013 movie, a hatchling Patchi is defecated on by a larger dinosaur. This wouldn't be so bad if he hadn't received a gaping open wound in his frill less than a minute before.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: Many a dinosaur fan and Walking with Dinosaurs fan have complained about the 2013 movie humanizing the animals too much.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: In Walking with Monsters, the evolution sequence from Cephalaspis to Hynerpeton (armored jawless fish to early tetrapod/early emphibian) skips a number of steps that would have made interesting sequences in their own right (jawed fish of all sorts, lobe finned fish, etc.).
    • This means the villain of the third sequence, the giant Hyneria, was actually part of our ancestry. Not all human ancestors were weak.
  • Ugly Cute: Oh so many examples.
    • The cynodonts from "New Blood", and their babies for that matter. They're like little, half-bald puppies.
    • The baby Diplodocus from "Time of the Titans". At certain points, they even sound like human babies! And rather than being creepy, the effect is downright adorable.
    • The Cryptoclidus and baby Opthalmosaurus in "Cruel Sea". The former is basically a Jurassic seal (Although closer to a fully marine penguin in Real Life...still sounds cute) and the latter is essentially a Jurassic dolphin.
    • The Tapejara from "Giant of the Skies" and pretty much every pterosaur in the series. The fact that pterosaurs were this in real life certainly helps.
    • The Leaellynasaura from "Spirits of the Ice Forest". All of them.
    • And finally, the baby Tyrannosaurus from "Death of a Dynasty". Especially the runt of the litter.
    • The Troodon from the 3D movie. How can you not "d'aww" at that face?
  • Uncanny Valley: The baby Pachyrhinosaurus in the movie have adult voices which, combined with the lack of lip-synching, sound disconnected to the characters.
    • The Diplodocus hatchlings of the original show sometimes utter noises awfully reminiscent of human babies.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Its visual effects are among the most impressive in any TV series ever, period.
    • Special mention must go to Sea Monsters. It features pre-historic creatures underwater and interacting with Nigel.
    • The arena spectacular for the sheer spectacle of seeing life-sized dinosaurs live in front of you.
    • Although the WWD movie got mostly negative and mixed reviews, the visuals have impressed mostly everyone, whether it's just the CGI or the 3D effects as well. The bulk of the critics single them (as well as John Leguizamo's "spirited way with words") out as the sole saving graces of the film.
  • What an Idiot: Nigel. Oh, Nigel. "There's no way I'd even think about jumping in waters where a mega-sized piranha is the least of your worries... OH!!! A TURTLE!!! WHERE'S MY DIVING SUIT?!"
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: The series arguably was destined to a general public including both adults and children: however, for some people who watched it during childhood, several parts of the Walking With series are nothing but a long, endless sequence of Nightmare Fuel-related stuff. Arguably, talking about prehistory in a more reassuring way "will never be allowed" in TV. And the book "A Natural History" doesn't exactly better the situation, either.
    • The feature-length WWD film shouldn't escape mention. While light-hearted and anthropomorphized compared to the original mini-series, a few moments still qualify as rather frightening. The forest fire, and the death of Bulldust the Pachyrhinosaurus at the hands of the Gorgosaurus pack, both stand out. And the way Pachyrhinosaurus protagonist Patchi, having lost both love interest Juniper and the respect of his brother Scowler, just accepts his fate of being eaten alive by scavenging Troodons and azhdarchids is both downright terrifying and depressing.
  • The Woobie:
    • Tyrannosaurus rex in the final episode. First, she loses her eggs after volcanic activity kills the embryos. Then, she seeks a new mate and then drives him away, but after laying twelve only three hatch. Then, one of her babies dies, implicitly at the teeth of its own siblings. Then she is fatally injured by an Ankylosaurus while trying to protect them and suffers a slow agonizing death shortly after. The only saving grace is that her death meant she didn't have to die in the mass extinction.
    • For another case of "apex predator with children vs. mass extinction", the Basilosaurus from WWB.
    • The old Ornithocheirus. He risked his life flying all the way to his old mating grounds, is driven away the minute he gets there, and dies of exhaustion without managing to mate at all.
    • Stoic Woobie: The mother Gastornis from the first episode of WWB, after she discovers that her hatchling has been eaten by a swarm of ants. You can tell that she's not happy about it in the slightest, but her only response is to huff quietly and walk away, presumably to seek a new nesting sight.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/WalkingWithDinosaurs