YMMV / Troy

  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Given that Paris is said to be a huge womaniser, is it possible he really loves Helen? Or is he just going to drop her when he gets bored, and move onto another woman who takes his fancy?
    • Did Briseis only fall for Achilles out of Stockholm Syndrome? Or was she genuinely impressed by him not being a total "dumb brute"? Or a third camp suggests that she may have decided to become his lover out of pragmatism - as Achilles was at least decent to her and therefore a better option than being gang raped by the other men. Another way to read their sex scene is that she may have expected she would be raped soon, and chose to give herself to Achilles as a way of making sure she at least had some choice in losing her virginity.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: A variation. A large amount of press for the film consisted of women's magazines Squeeing over "Brad Pitt in a skirt!"
  • Broken Base: On whether Helen deserves sympathy or not. Those who say she doesn't point out that she started a war and gets away scot-free, while showing minimal guilt. Those who think she does deserve sympathy point to her attempt to give herself back to the Greeks, and the look between her and Hector before he goes to fight Achilles - where she is clearly sorry for what she's done. Other characters point out that Helen's elopement was merely an excuse for the Greeks to invade - and that Agamemnon outright says he only wishes to conquer Troy, regardless of Helen. It's up to the viewer whether this is Character Shilling or not.
  • Common Knowledge: The Trojan horse, Achilles' death, and fall of Troy were not mentioned in The Iliad.
  • Designated Hero: Achilles is a bit of a jerk. This is mostly accurate as he spends a good deal of the poem a self-centered asshole, and is only shaken out of his selfishness by the death of his dearest friend.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Julian Glover as Triopas, Brian Cox as Agamemnon, John Shrapnel as Nestor, Orlando Bloom as Paris, Ken Bones as Hippasus, Julie Christie as Thetis and Nigel Terry as Archeptolemus. Notice how so few of them are Trojans. It should be an indication that something is wrong when the so-called "villains" are more memorable than most of the so-called "heroes" and none of them is even the star!
  • Estrogen Brigade: Although this is a Rated M for Manly action movie, it has a large amount of female fans. Brad Pitt, Eric Bana and Orlando Bloom all have Shirtless Scenes - Pitt especially spending the whole movie in very skimpy armour.
  • Fridge Logic: Are the gods still in there manipulating events, even though they're not seen?
  • Heartwarming Moments: Priam's speech.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: On the first day of the siege, Achilles lets Hector go free saying "it's too early in the day for killing princes". He later fights Hector to the latter's death in the morning.
  • Hate Dumb: Diane Kruger had to endure rather a lot of people snarking that she wasn't believable as "the face that launched a thousand ships", despite the movie going to great lengths to point out that it's only really Menelaus who's going to war for Helen - and that the real appeal of the war is the opportunity to conquer Troy.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • With Achilles' trademark finisher resembling a certain leaping assassination technique from a certain video game series and at least three of the Greco-Roman gods comprising the First Civilization, maybe Achilles was really an Assassin.
    • The fact that this is one of the few movies where Sean Bean's character (Odysseus) doesn't die, a movie where over half the named cast members die, ranks up there as well.
    • A major plot point is Achilles getting sick of being at Agamemnon's beck and call. Which happens every week in the first season of Danball Senki.
    • Sean Bean plays Odysseus here (one of the few films where he doesn't get killed) and would later play Zeus, the king of the Greek gods, in the film adaptation of Percy Jackson.
    • Word of God is that he didn't want Helen to appear in the film, feeling no actress could live up to the audience's expectations. He compromised by casting an unknown actress - and half the press came from journalists snarking that Diane Kruger wasn't pretty enough.
    • Diane Kruger makes things go very badly for Rose Byrne here. A couple of years later, they starred together in Wicker Park - where Byrne gets her own back. She splits up Kruger's relationship and tries to sleep with her boyfriend in her place. Furthermore Byrne's character in Troy chooses to become a virgin priestess, whereas in Wicker Park she's sleeping with two men.
  • Memetic Badass: Achilles. "Who would win? Achilles or...?" (Leonidas/Maximus/Superman/Chuck Norris...) Experts have even pronounced him "Str 8 gangsta", unusually for the time period. Beowulf fans debate at length: "Achilles is kinda cheating with the heel thing..." And the answer is: Achilles.
  • Ho Yay: When Achilles gives his Rousing Speech, Eudoras is seen looking at him in a way that's clearly meant to show how much he respects Achilles - but ends up looking like he's gazing lovingly at a crush.
  • Moment of Awesome:
    • Hector vs. Ajax
    • Achilles vs. Hector.
    • Achilles finally getting shot.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Practically every Greek solider, save Achilles and Odysseus, crosses it when they sack Troy in the Director's Cut.
    • If Agamemnon hadn't already crossed it, "I gave her to the men!" made him sail over it like he was launched from a cannon.
  • Narm:
    • Brad Pitt's accent seems a likely place. This is primarily for the sake of balance but the film does have a kind of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves silliness to it.
    • The film goes to great, almost absurd lengths to assure the audience that Achilles is straight and that his cousin and surrogate little brother figure Patroclus is probably straight (or at least ambiguously straight or whatever).
    • The Hector/Achilles fight is so overly choreographed it almost feels more like a dance scene than a duel to the death.
  • Nightmare Fuel: The Sack of Troy, especially in the Director's Cut.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Julie Christie appears in just one scene as Thetis, and yet manages to be very memorable. It helps that Thetis is the only God to appear in the film, and it's left open whether or not she actually is onenote 
  • The Scrappy: Paris is not well liked by fans. Even Orlando Bloom didn't think too highly of the character, calling him a cowardly wimp.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • For all the Ham and Cheese in this movie, the look on King Priam's face when he emerges from his chambers to find his beloved Troy in flames is utterly heartbreaking.
    • Hector descending to fight Achilles. We all know how well that was going to turn out for him.
    • And it seems his family, who are watching on, also seem to know what little chance Hector stands against Achilles. The shots of his wife, Andromache, are especially heartbreaking, as she practically has a nervous breakdown during the fight, and her reaction to his death is even worse.
    • Hector showing Andromache the escape tunnels beneath the city in case Troy is sacked and Hector dies. Made worse by the fact that some versions of the myth do not end well for Andromache.
    • Hector's face in every single scene. Man knows they're on a slippery slope to hell five minutes into the film but he can't DO anything about it (without dooming Paris) and that realization makes his entire performance just heartbreaking.
    • Priam asking for his son Hector's body back, especially this line:
      Priam: "You're still my enemy tonight. But even enemies can show respect."
      • There's also his line "How many cousins have you killed? How many sons and fathers and brothers and husbands? How many brave Achilles?" Peter O'Toole's delivery is just heartbreaking to say the least.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Achilles was planning to sail home and live a new life with Briseis. Then Patroclus decides to impersonate Achilles and fight as him. Hector killing him sparks Achilles into fighting Hector to the death. Achilles later dies during the fall of Troy. While the wooden horse thing may have happened anyway, Patroclus's actions led to his cousin being killed, and Hector's child being left fatherless. All because of Honor Before Reason.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: Brad Pitt as Achilles was quite a stretch among audiences.
  • The Woobie:
    • Patroclus, who wants so badly to fight for his brethren and dies impersonating Achilles.
    • Andromache who must watch as her husband is killed and their baby left fatherless.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/Troy