YMMV / Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

YMMV tropes present in the book:

  • Accidental Aesop: Hermione's subplot could be interpreted as, "Doing well in school is great, but your mental health comes first. If school is putting a strain on your well-being, it's not worth it."
  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Sir Cadogan, the portrait that takes over guarding Gryffindor Tower for The Fat Lady after she's attacked by Sirius Black, and whose work style involves setting "ridiculously complicated" passwords, and changing them at least twice a day. Is he stark raving mad, or Properly Paranoid taken Up to Eleven?
  • Ass Pull:
    • The Reveal that Sirius is Harry's godfather if you think about it. When Harry was given to the Dursleys, Hagrid casually mentioned Sirius, implying that he wasn't accused of selling out the Potters yet, so it would beg the question why Harry wasn't given to him first.
    • The Time Turner remains another one. It was foreshadowed but the late act revelation and rigid and hastily explained rules and potential can of worms it could open in terms of possibilities (which went unexplored in the books but not in the wider fandom), made everyone see it as an especially contrived Deus ex Machina, that only works because of the Emotional Torque of Harry unleashing his first fully grown Patronus.
  • Ending Fatigue: Not too bad, but off to see Buckbeak get executed - diverted to shrieking shack, long Plot Dump, Werewolf ensues, time turner, going back though the evening and THEN it's over.
  • Fridge Brilliance:
    • Snape asks Lupin if Harry might have gotten the Marauder's Map from one of the makers. Considering he went to school with the Marauders, and was likely insulted by them in the same way as the map (as well as familiar with their nicknames), he probably suspects that Lupin had something to do with the map - which he does.
    • In the film, the music Lupin plays during the Boggart lesson. Seems silly at first but then you realise he's trying to keep the mood light so the students will be able to imagine their worst fears as something comical.
    • The first time Ron and Harry notice Hermione has briefly stepped away from them between classes, she changes the subject by voicing her hope that there's something good for lunch, she's starving. Of course she's starving: she's just used the Time Turner to live through twice as many hours since breakfast as they did!
  • Fridge Horror: Harry's textbook poking lighthearted fun at witch burnings. Sure, it was no more than a mild inconvenience for the wizard (one witch liked it so much that she kept allowing herself to be captured), but what about those poor Muggles misidentified as witches, who really are being burned at the stake?
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • At one point in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Scabbers bit Goyle on the knuckle (which was even referenced by Fred and George Weasley in Azkaban). Come Azkaban, and the revelation that Scabbers was actually Peter Pettigrew, who was the true person responsible for leaking Lily and James Potter's location to Lord Voldemort and thus their deaths, not to mention the revelation in Goblet of Fire that Goyle's father was most likely one of Pettigrew's comrades among the Death Eaters it becomes somewhat disturbing.
    • Ron carrying him around in his pocket and Scabbers even falling asleep on Harry's bed at one point in Philosopher's Stone.
  • Growing the Beard: Many fans believe that this is the turning point for the series as a whole, citing the encounter at the Shrieking Shack, the darker emotions and actual feelings of loss Harry feels about his family (that had not been really explored in the previous books) and of course the Bittersweet Ending Sirius is proven innocent to Harry and Dumbledore but remains on the run alongside Buckbeak, and Lupin has to quit, while Harry worries about Trelawney's prophecy and the consequences of sparing Wormtail potentially bringing Voldemort back. Compared to the out-and-out positive victories in the first two books, it was bleaker and prepared for the gradual darkening of the remaining books.
  • Ho Yay: Sirius and Lupin. Even more so in the movie.
    • The following line was cut from American editions of the book. Make of that what you will.
    The professor walked to Black's side, seized his hand, pulled him to his feet so that Crookshanks fell to the floor, and embraced Black like a brother.
  • Idiot Plot: The denouement at the end depends on the following characters (Snape, Remus) suddenly forgetting the following details:Remus is a werewolf, tonight is a full moon, and Remus has to take the Wolfsbane potion. Remus forgets about it entirely, despite the fact that he has lived with it all his life, which can only be explained in a character sense about how seeing Sirius and Peter Pettigrew on the Marauder's Map makes him think differently. Snape however comes to Remus room with the Potion (which he mentions during their confrontation) and despite having had a traumatic experience in his youth at the Shrieking Shack, still goes down there to meet Remus without having any real backup plan against a werewolf set to transform. Without this contrivance, Peter Pettigrew would not really be able to escape and Sirius still be on the run.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: "Awful things happen to wizards who meddle with time, Harry." And in the very next movie, a certain time-travelling alien gets a Fate Worse Than Death.
    • The part where Snape gets insulted by the Marauder's Map after Pottermore revealed that it was designed to do that to Snape and only Snape, not just anyone who tried to read it without the password.
  • It Was His Sled: Sirius ain't evil. Lupin is a werewolf. Ron's pet rat Scabbers is really Peter Pettigrew, a human.
  • Older Than They Think: Many people assume that Rowling invented Hippogriffs for this book. She didn't.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Aunt Marge only appears in one chapter (which has her name on it), but still manages to be among the more despicable characters in the series, perhaps even more so than her brother Vernon.
  • Shipping Goggles: The series has enough of this to fill a page, but this entry probably has the best example, what has been dubbed "The Symbolic Flight". This theory states that because Harry and Hermione flew together on Buckbeak together and without Ron, that they are destined to be together - ignoring the fact that Ron was only not present because he broke his leg earlier.

YMMV tropes present in the film:

  • Accidental Innuendo: The scene from the book listed above is even more dodgy in the film, when Harry's Uncle Vernon keeps bursting into the room to find out what's going on. Vernon is played by Richard Griffiths, AKA Uncle Monty.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • After everyone arrives at Hogwarts to start the new year, the Fat Lady won't let them into Gryffindor Tower because she's too busy trying to shatter a glass with her voice.
    • The talking Shrunken Head on the Knight Bus.
    • The choir singing an arrangement of the witches' chant from Macbeth... along with croaking toads?
  • Broken Base: Half the fanbase considers this one of the best (if not the best) Harry Potter film in the franchise, or at least when the Harry Potter films started getting good. The other half considers this movie to be one of the worst (if not the worst) Harry Potter film in the franchise. The film was mostly better received by critics than the first two, although it was the first HP film not to get four stars from Roger Ebert. Also, this is J.K. Rowling's favorite film. Particular anger was given to Steve Kloves having his favorite character Hermione steal Ron's big moment of declaring Sirius will have to go through them to get to Harry, despite having a broken leg.
  • Continuity Lock-Out: This was the point when the movies started to get hard to understand for anyone who wasn't already familiar with the respective books. Most notably, this movie never makes it clear who Padfoot, Wormtail, Moony, and Prongs are, despite later movies operating on the assumption that the viewers all know.
  • Critical Dissonance: The film was adored by critics when it came out, opening to the most critical success any Potter film had seen at that point. On the other side, it left the Potter fanbase fairly polarized.
  • Growing the Beard: According to most professional critics, along with about half of the fans. At the very least, people agreed that the younger actors and actresses were finally fitting snugly into their roles (aside from the Narm mentioned below).
  • Internet Backdraft: Best movie in the series? Worst movie in the series? Middlingest movie in the series? Whatever your opinion, a huge chunk of the fandom will loathe you for it.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • SIRIUS DID HIS WAITING! TWELVE YEARS OF IT! IN AZKABAN!!!
    • HE WAS THEIR FRIEND!
    • Turn to page three-hundred and ninety-four.
  • Narm:
    • The movie is full of it, most notably Harry's crying scene in Hogsmeade (blame Daniel Radcliffe), Draco getting attacked by Buckbeak (blame Tom Felton), and the punching scene (blame Emma Watson, Tom Felton, and Steve Kloves).
    • Apparently "believing in yourself" equates to SHOUTING AT THE TOP OF YOUR LUNGS. No quiet confidence in the film version of the Potterverse. EXPECTO LOUDYELLUM!
    • Malfoy being attacked by Buckbeak, which was deliberately Narm-y; in the book, it was stated that he over-played how bad the injury really was. Why? Because he's Draco Malfoy and he's a whiny brat. And because he wanted to get Hagrid fired.
    • The Fly-at-the-Camera Ending, with overly long freeze frame.
    • Sirius's "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight with Lupin, wherein he makes a futile attempt to use The Power of Love and The Power of Ham to convince Lupin to not turn into a werewolf. And then Lupin does turn into a werewolf, which looks like a balding chupacabra (unlike the book, where werewolves only have slight physical differences from normal wolves).
    • The sheer number of times the whirring sound effect is used for any and every spell that is cast.
  • Narm Charm: "You foul, loathsome, evil little cockroach!" It's a near 50/50 mix of awesome and narm.
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: The Game Boy Advance version, mostly.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The film's drastic changes from the book were not welcome to some.
    • Alfonso's complete redesigning of Hogwarts geography, coupled with the overall more comedic tone the film has compared to the previous two, not to mention the Shrunken Head added to the Knight Bus.
    • The excision of the explanation of the identities of Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot, and Prongs, which confused many moviegoers who hadn't read the books. Especially since it would have been relatively simple to slip into Lupin's final scene.
  • Vindicated by History: The film was initially quite divisive for its divergence from the original novel, but now it's one of the most acclaimed and favored films of the eight because of the huge risk it took, which inspired future films to do the same thing. It opened to the most positive reviews the series had seen thus far, and is the second most acclaimed film of the series on Rotten Tomatoes — beaten only by Deathly Hallows - Part 2.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerofAzkaban