YMMV / Dragonball GT

  • Americans Hate Tingle: It's more like a Broken Base, but its detractors do reach Hatedom level in the English-speaking fandom, but in Japan it's generally fairly decently-regarded. Its ratings weren't that great, but looking at how it compares to the end of Z, the ratings were falling off at about the same rate, and in retrospect, it seems time has been rather kind to GT in Japan.
  • Archive Panic: Combined with the other two shows, there's 508 episodes. Each episode being about 20 minutes long, that's 170 hours of content. It's even worse if you add Dragon Ball Super to the list, bumping up the total number of episodes by 131 episodes, which was more than GT had for its running time.
  • Awesome Music: While most fans would say the series theme isn't even vaguely fitting due to the more hardcore, intense approach Creator/Funimation chose(For context, Funimation's GT dub originally broadcast with this opening...), it's still a fantastic song, and its Canadian and original Japanese counterparts are equally awesome, and much more fitting with their appraoch to the show overall.
    • The various ending songs are all also highly praised, as is the incidental music in the series, composed and arranged by Akihito Tokunaga.
  • Broken Base: The ending. Its fans call it the best part of the show, a Tear Jerker that wraps up the whole series on a bittersweet but triumphant note. Its detractors, with equal conviction, call it the worst part of the show, arguing that it doesn't make a ton of sense and doesn't let Goku get the happy ending with his family he deserves after all the hardships he's endured.
  • Contested Sequel: For many Dragon Ball fans. It does have its strengths, such as better pacing when compared with Z's frequent Arc Fatigue, explosive and intense fight scenes, and even its detractors will admit that it has some genuinely good ideas for continuing the series. It also has some of the best animation in the series, something that even people who dislike the show have a hard time denying. On the other hand, the decreasing relevance in fights of everyone not named Goku from the end of Z is taken even further here, and the fact most of the secondary and tertiary characters were represented by an episode or two in the limelight each, rather than the other series' usual approach of everyone being present at once are sour points for some fans (Though its fans would argue the handling of the other characters was a good thing, as it gives each character their moment in the limelight, something Z arguably dropped the ball on more and more as time went on), and even GT's fans admit that the writing was somewhat spotty.
  • Continuity Lock-Out: GT relies fairly heavily on its viewers having at least a passing familiarity with the characters' long histories in the show, though some would ague the first few episodes establish Goku, Pan, and Trunks well enough for a newbie to get to grips with it.
  • Counterpart Comparison: Comic fans have noticed that, while Goku origins are similar (or downright identical) to Superman, the way he transforms from a small child to a powerful grown man in his Super Saiyan Four transformation is really similar to Captain Marvel, or Shazam as he is mostly known. They are even both red.
  • Fandom Rivalry: A very odd examples since they are fans of the same franchise, but fans of GT have a rivalry against Dragon Ball Super since they're both sequel series to Dragon Ball Z. The rivalry happened because the events of Super cannot correlate with the events of GT, leading to the general assumption that GT and Super are alternate continuities. Fans of GT call Super the inferior sequel to Z since GT has a better pacing and animation. Super fans, naturally, brings up the old laundry list of GT's well-known flaws, and many argue that since it didn't have Toriyama's involvement outside of some concept and character artwork, it deserves to be exiled from canon according to them, though this perception isn't entirely true, since Toriyama was heavily involved in the show's conception, and was on the story team for at least the first 10 or 15 episodes. There is also another group of fans who maintain that Super and GT can work in the same timeline, like at some point Goku and Vegeta lose their god powers, and memories of everything that happened during Super. Although, that wouldn't explain why Hell in GT is very different from the Hell in Super, why Freeza is much weaker, why the Pilaf Gang are elderly in GT, rather than being much younger as in Super, and why Kibito and shin are still fused together.
    • A fairly neat solution is to just embrace the fact they're pretty much confirmed as Alternate Continuities; this also somewhat solves the issue of how filler from Z fits into the timeline, and how you can reconcile Bardock's different portrayal in Dragon Ball Minus and Episode Of Bardock compared to the original Bardock TV special from the '90s, since you can simply declare that Dragon Ball Kai and Dragon Ball Super take place in one timeline, while Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT take place in the other, with the common root of Dragon Ball. The original Bardock special takes place in the GT timeline, while Episode Of Bardock takes place in the newer timeline. Kai and GT don't fit together anyway, since one plot point involves using an object introduced in a filler arc that was cut from Kai, so this neatly ties this all up. So, if you're more of a fan of GT, you can just stick to the old timeline, and enjoy that, while if you're more of a fan of Super, you can just stick to the new timeline, and enjoy that.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: Baby is probably the most widely-regarded as this, between the wraparound shades, Pajama Sam skin, weird flesh-pompadour, and primary-colored spandex. At least he spends most of his arc fused with someone else.
  • Growing the Beard: For both its fans and detractors, most agree that the show really picked up once the gang went to planet M-2; the more episodic adventure storytelling from before was dropped, in favour of a more arc-based, villain-centric style, with the villain of that moment being General Rilldo, which fairly quickly lead into the Baby storyline. Though some would point out that this progression began quite a bit earlier, in episode 9, with the Luud cult. Though it's generally agreed the M-2 material is the actual moment when the show found its feet.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • In the episode where Earth is evacuated, Goten talks with a delinquent voiced by Chris Sabat. Funimation was referencing YuYu Hakusho with both characters being voiced by YuYu Hakusho actors.
    • In the English dubs from Z, they made up a line in which Vegeta joked that he got stronger by doing push ups and drinking milk (Ocean dub) or juice (Funi dub). In the Blue Water dub of GT, Goku claims the reason for his strength is doing several push ups so now we know the difference between the two fighters.
    • The meme of Base Kid Goku being more powerful than any previous Super Saiyan looks downright funny now that Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods and Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection F have had Goku absorb the power of a God and master it to the point that his base form is now far more powerful that he ever was as a Super Saiyan 3 and possibly 4. Really, it could help explain it.
      • Resurrection F introduces a new form, so it doesn't really fit in with GT. But there's no reason Battle Of Gods can't be part of the GT timeline. In hindsight, one line in the film even could be seen as foreshadowing the look and aura of Super Saiyan 4, when Beerus tells Goku that the Super Saiyan God form's red light will burn within him forevermore.
    • Even funnier, one of the biggest complaints about the show was how Gohan was downgraded to the point of not using his Ultimate form and relied on becoming a Super Saiyan. There was also an uproar about Goku beating Gohan in his base form. Come Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection F and Dragon Ball Super, Gohan can't use his full power anymore because he slacked off too much and Goku's base form is way stronger than Gohan ever was even with his massive power-up.
    • Freeza being curbstomped effortlessly by kid Goku becomes even more amusing after Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection F made Freeza one of the most powerful villains in the entire series. Granted, base form Goku would still kick final form Frieza's butt, but Frieza recieved a new form in that movie that gave Goku a far greater challenge.
    • During the battle with Oozaru Baby-Vegeta, Goku has Pan, Goten, Gohan, and Trunks restore his energy so he can defeat Baby-Vegeta. With the release of Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods and the revelation that the Super Saiyan God ritual involves five pure hearted Saiyans giving one their power, this means that if they had just gotten one more Saiyan, Goku could almost have become a Super Saiyan God.
    • Lex Lang voiced Gohan in the video game Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout. Now he's voicing Goku in the Bang Zoom dub of Dragon Ball Super.
    • The German dub of GT renamed the Black Star Dragon Balls as the Super Dragon Balls. Take a wild guess what the next new set of Dragon Balls to be introduced into the series canon would be named.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Years after the series has ended, the most iconic element of the series to really stick out for the franchise as a whole was the Super Saiyan 4 form. Especially with all the hypothetical fan art on further evolutions based on this idea, it helps that the "Super Saiyan God" and "Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan" forms are much less impressive to look at.
  • Macekre:
    • Funimation produced a terrible rap song for their theme and skipped the first 16 episodes and expected the audience to catch up using a Recap Episode. Thankfully, they backtracked on this and later released the series in full, and the "Season" DV Ds don't include the rap song at all, however the stereo mix of the dub still uses the hiphop/metal incidental music, the scripts are still Cut And Paste Translations, the narrator still sounds like he's narrating a hollywood movie trailer, and the overall tone of the dub still speaks to the "Hardcore" style the dub seemed to be attempting, which makes the 5.1 mix that uses the original, lighthearted Japanese music incredibly jarring.
    • Averted in the UK and Canada, where the show had a different dub done by Blue Water studios, using the original Japanese score, scripts with proper, accurate translations, and generally a tone that matched the original Japanese version perfectly. As a TV dub produced by Ocean, many assume it would be heavily censored and edited for time, just like the Saban-produced 1996 dub of the first two seasons of Z, the Trimark-produced 1995 dub of the first season of original series, and the AB Groupe-produced "Westwood" dub of seasons 4 onwards of Znote , but in fact, aside from one 15-second sequence from episode 8 that had to be cut due to Goku's junk showing, the dub is actually entirely uncut, and unlike previous TV dubs, instead of censoring hell to HFILnote , they went with "Hades", or "The Underworld", depending on the contextnote .
    • Actually happened with the French dub. They fired the whole cast of veteran VAs who had gone on strike over wage disputes, and hired a poor cast to replace everyone, when even now Goku and Vegeta's VA (to only mention them) have reached proper fame and legend status in France, reprising their roles for Super. Also, they fudged the translation quite a bit (namely references to Vegeta NOT being a pure Saiyan?!) and added tons of whacky dialogue (Gohan going on an emo rant about how he hates Piccolo for dying on him) that felt very out of place, and it can be argued that this is one of the biggest reasons why GT got so much hate in France.
    • It was even worse in Germany, where tons of episodes were skipped, the ones that were dubbed were heavily cut-down and edited into each-other in a rather haphazard way, and the scripts were based on the French dub.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • GT's infamous issues with consistent power levels combined with Goku defeating major villains more easily in his base form while having more trouble with them in any of his various Super Saiyan forms crated the idea of Base Kid Goku being more powerful than anyone else in the franchise.
    • The fact that an elderly Krillin was able to land a hit on Goku during their friendly fight at the end of GT (Goku was obviously not fighting at full power) has prompted a meme that Old Man Krillin is the biggest Badass ever who could defeat anyone with ease.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Baby attacking his own mind controlled citizens for fun and trying to destroy the Earth simply because he knows it'd hurt Goku. And even mind-controlled they weren't willing to die for Baby's cause; they were crying and shivering with fear.
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: In a meta-sense, it was used deliberately by FUNimation when marketing the series in North America. At first, they started their releases with the 17th episode and made their own recap of the first 16 ("A Grand Problem"), ostensibly to jump straight into the more action-oriented part of the series. The heat they took from the fanboys was intense. Once the first 16 episodes were being put out as "Lost Episodes", however, the goal they'd had all along became apparent: to generate demand for the less-appreciated earlier episodes through fan outrage. Mission accomplished.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: Dragon Ball GT: Final Bout is an awful fighting game with shoddy controls, awful visuals and animation, Camera Screw, little to no character variety, and a dub so bad that even Steve Blum's portrayal of Goku isn't redeemable. The only thing really notable about it is that it's the first Dragon Ball game to come to the west with the license intact, albeit as a very limited release.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Old lady Pan from episode 64 and the TV special, due to having out-grown her whininess.
    • Bra also goes from annoying young girl to awesome just on the strength of her getting Vegeta to shave off that stupid moustache.
  • Scapegoat Creator: In an odd reversal, many detractors of the series point to Akira Toriyama's lack of involvement in the show's creative process. In reality, he was involved to a degree (he named the series, drew the logo, acted as a consultant for plot ideas, and designed the aged characters. So, yes, Toriyama was the one who gave Vegeta a flat-top and mustache), and going further than that, he's stated several times he's actually a big fan of the series. He even doodled a sketch of Super Saiyan 4 Goku on the side of his blurb for the GT Dragon Box. Think about that for a second: the creator of Dragon Ball drew fanart of someone else's transformation made for one of his characters.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Goku turning into a Golden Great Ape and then becoming a Super Saiyan 4.
    • Baby turning into a Golden Great Ape to fight Super Saiyan 4 Goku.
    • Piccolo staying on Earth and dying to destroy the Black Star Dragon Balls.
    • Goku using his Dragon Fist to kill Super 17.
    • Vegeta becoming a Super Saiyan 4.
    • Gogeta vs. Omega Shenron, for the sheer utter mud stomp it was.
    • Goku killing Omega Shenron with a Universal Spirit Bomb and then flying off with Shenron before saying goodbye to all his friends and family.
    • Both of the main goodbye scenes, arguably; the one with Piccolo, and the one with Roshi and Krillin.
  • The Scrappy: When it comes to Arc villains in the franchise as a whole, Super 17 is among the few villains who has very few fans. He doesn't have much sense as villain, makes Android 17 evil again while boasting how superior he is to humans (Expecially considering he used to be a human himself). Many fans while watching the show tend to downright skip his arc altogether. Despite this, he somehow keeps appearing as a playable fighter in any game that has GT characters in it, most likely due to being a major villain in the franchise, though Baby and Super Yi Xing Longnote  far surpass him in terms of popularity.
  • So Okay, It's Average: Now that the dust has mostly settled, most fans seem to view GT as having some good ideas that were poorly executed and overshadowed by some of the less savory decisions and designs, and that the series as a whole is fine enough even if it never really lives up to its full potential.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Some would argue everyone who wasn't Goku was this, though GT's fans argue that because the cast is so large, instead of having everyone appear together and not be able to do anything noteworthy individually, in GT, each character got their moment in the spotlight for at least an episode or two.
    • General Rilldo. One of the first characters introduced in GT who can truly challenge Goku. He is stronger Majin Buu in his base form and can regenerate as long as there's metal around, which is the entire planet, making him close to invincible. He is also only the second Benevolent Boss villain introduced in the series and has the Story-Breaker Power of turning anyone hit with his mouth beam into metal. He's sort of like a cross between Buu and Dabura. He would have been an interesting villain on his own, but he has a bridge dropped on him to make room for Baby. Worse, when he briefly returns in the Super 17 arc, he is fighting Gohan and giving him a hard time, managing to turn Gohan's arm into metal. He is one-shotted by Uub with no fanfare. Though arguably the fact he doesn't really have anything in the way of characterisation means he may have been a really boring main villain.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • There are lots of good ideas for epic story arcs, like a Tuffle experiment trying to avenge their race by taking over Earthlings to convert them into its own kind, including strange Tsurifian variations on the Super Saiyan forms, a new form of the Great Ape based on the Super Saiyan transformation and a new form of Super Saiyan based on the Great Ape form, the return of every previous villain in the series as they jailbreak hell, including a souped-up super android created as an instrument of Gero's vengeance from beyond the grave, and fighting evil manifestations of a negative Shenron while finally having consequences for overusing the Dragon Balls to provide a Reset Button in previous stories. However, many argue that characters are wasted, and the plotting is iffy, leading to this potential being wasted.
    • Earlier in the Baby Saga, Baby contemplated possessing Goku, even saying if he had Goku's power he would be invincible. He never follows through with this. Even when he has Goku on the ropes, instead of possessing him, he tries to kill him with a Revenge Ball. This is despite Goku being the strongest character, even stuck in a child's body, and thus a better would-be host than Vegeta (remember Vegeta could only go up to Super Saiyan 2). After being defeated by Goku, instead of trying to possess Goku, he instead runs away, though one could argue that since Goku was curbstomping him by that point, an attempt to possess him would be met by a max-power Kamehameha, leading to his death anyway.
    • The Shadow Dragons, and the nature of their birth. Each of the seven dragons are born from one of the major wishes from Dragon Ball history, with the more selfless wishes creating more powerful dragons, and each one having different powers. The arc easily could have had the heroes split up and confront them, giving both spotlight for the other characters, but also use the concept of the karma built up by the Dragon Balls to explore the past of the heroes or give the villains intriguing motivations. Instead the arc involves Goku and Pan traveling around the earth and fighting them, and all but Syn, Nuova, and Eis are extremely weak foes that only use the wish that created them as a cheap Call-Back. The only reason the fights with all but the last three end up lasting as long as they do is thanks to Goku or Pan holding the Idiot Ball and creating unnecessary drama. Furthermore, with the exception of Nuova, none of them have anything going on besides For the Evulz. This extends to Omega Shenron, who is the Master of All version of the Shadow Dragons, and is the strongest villain pre Battle of Gods era, but his overall motivations and connection to the idea of karma punishment to the heroes is just tossed aside.
    Lanipator: Syn Shenron, who becomes Omega Shenron, feels absolutely no different from every villain before him. His motivation is fascinating, but does nothing to inform his actions. He's just evil for evil's sake, and what started as karma just becomes cliché.
  • Vindicated by History:
    • A lesser example: The Super Saiyan 4 transformation was originally seen as a bit weird, and perhaps too much of a departure from the traditional saiyan "look." After Battle Of The Gods and Resurrecetion F revealed the divisive Super Saiyan God and Super Saiyan Blue, Super Saiyan 4 has gained back several fans who used to dislike the form due to it being both visually distinctive and hearkening back to the old associations between saiyans and apes.
    • A downplayed example due to the vocal Hatedom, and the show's generally Broken Base status, but for some Dragon Ball fans the series falls under this category. Back in the day, you'd be hard pressed to find anyone who would so much as admit that they even liked GT. Nowadays, there're a lot more fans who can look fondly back on GT and admit that it got more hate then it deserved. Even a lot of its detractors will admit that there were aspects to GT that weren't awful just executed poorly.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Trunks' outfit, consisting of a black turtleneck, gray sportscoat, blue bandana, and khaki shorts. The idea seemed to try and be a call-back to his Future incarnation while incorporating Bulma's design as well, but the overall design looks far more silly than it should of. IGN in particular criticized his new design as overly goofy.


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