Video Game / Mega Man Rock Force

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A fan-made Mega Man (Classic) game by GoldwaterDLS. It stars Mega Man and the Rock Force, a group of Robot Masters formed to ensure there would always be someone to fight against evil should Mega Man be unavailable. When eight Robot Masters suddenly rebel against their employers for unknown reasons, the Rock Force and Justice Man, a robot Dr. Light created to aid Mega Man in training the group, were sent out to neutralize the rebels, only to mysteriously disappear. Mega Man thus decides to get into action himself in order to stop the rebels, rescue the Rock Force, and investigate what happened to Justice Man (an earlier incident regarding Shock Man six months ago may have something to do with it)...

The Robot Rebels consist of:
  • Crypt Man: Weak to Photon Flare and Dive Missile, holds Knight Man captive, gives you Crypt Cloak.
  • Pulse Man: Weak to Virus Outbreak and Rolling Cutter, holds Nitro Man captive, gives you Pulse Stopper.
  • Virus Man: Weak to Charade Clone and Fire Storm, holds Dive Man captive, gives you Virus Outbreak.
  • Fuse Man: Weak to Shock Gauntlet and Thunder Beam, holds Bomb Man captive, gives you Phantom Fuse.
  • Photon Man: Weak to Phantom Fuse and Hyper Bomb, holds Fire Man captive, gives you Photon Flare.
  • Shock Man: Weak to Circuit Breaker and Wheel Cutter, holds Elec Man captive, gives you Shock Gauntlet.
  • Circuit Man: Weak to Pulse Stopper and Tornado Man's standard attacks, holds Cut Man captive, gives you Circuit Breaker.
  • Charade Man: Weak to Crypt Cloak and Knight Crush, holds Tornado Man captive, gives you Charade Clone.

You can download the game here.

Mega Man Rock Force has examples of:

  • A Day in the Limelight: The player can invoke this with the other Rock Force members in later versions, since they become playable upon being rescued. The cutscenes are even modified to focus on the Robot Master in question.
  • Absentee Actor: Wily.
  • All There in the Manual: Not just the story, but also Robot Master specifications that give hints to their weaknesses.
  • All the Worlds Are a Stage: The final level of the game combines gimmick sections from 7 of the first 8 Robot Masters into one level (Crypt Man's hands, Pulse Man's accelerators and teleporters, Virus Man's disappearing blocks, Fuse Man's minecarts, Photon Man's rising blocks and solar panels, Shock Man's conductive floors, and Circuit Man's bulb/switches), and the dancing robots from Charade Man's stage make an appearance as well. In earlier versions, the last level actually contained reskinned versions of portions of all of the first 8 stages.
  • An Ice Person: Polar Man, the second fortress boss.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: The game has settings to make the game easier or harder. Among the default settings are spikes dealing only half your character's health instead of outright killing him. Further, by default, the stages have four checkpoints each instead of the usual two, which compensates for the fact that the stages in this game are longer than those in a normal Mega Man game. Charade Clone also invokes this, by allowing Mega Man to use an Expendable Clone of himself to get past trickier hazards.
  • Auto-Scrolling Level: The final stretch of Terror Man's level.
  • Badass Cape: Crypt Man sports one, which can be used to block your character's shots.
  • Badass in Distress: The Rock Force.
  • Barrier Warrior:
    • Virus Man gives you the Virus Outbreak, but Virus Man himself never really used it until the latest game build where it is now one of his attacks.
    • There's also Pulse Man, who gives you the Pulse Stopper. It's a big ring that can be fired anywhere (basically yet another nerfed version of Metal Blade), but if you hold the fire button, the ring will cover Mega Man, and will absorb bullets.
  • Big Boo's Haunt: Crypt Man's stage is... well, a crypt. Terror Man and Death Man's stages also have elements of this theme.
  • Bittersweet Ending: Added in later updates: Although Justice Man is damaged beyond repair and is effectively dead, his cause opens Dr. Light's eyes into making things better for robots, and the Robot Masters (who'd have suffered his fate were it not for Mega Man and the Rock Force) are rebuilt and given better jobs and lives. In earlier versions, the ending was a sudden and unexpected bummer through and through.
  • Bleak Level: Terror Man and Death Man's stages. Especially the latter, because it has no enemies at all.
  • Boss Rush: Yet another given staple of a Mega Man game.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Sort of. Shock Man shocked Justice Man at the end of the intro stage, which rearranged his mental matrix and made him 'not the same'. This only happens in previous versions, though.
  • The Brute: Flare Man, the combined result of Photon Man and Charade Man.
  • Checkpoint Starvation: Generally averted; by default, each stage, while longer than those of a typical Mega Man stage, has four checkpoints. You can lower the number of checkpoints to the more standard two if you wish, or you can fully invoke this trope by turning off checkpoints entirely.
  • Corridor Cubbyhole Run:
    • Shock Man's stage has an area where the water gets electrified, therefore your character must quickly get out of the water before the shock rods contact it.
    • Terror Man's stage has an area where a fast-moving wreckage of Wily Machine 4 flies over; you must hide in alcoves to avoid getting killed.
  • Could Have Been Messy: The April 2015 update adds a scene to the prologue where Crypt Man is holding a press conference. During said conference, he confirms that, while his companions were a bit too... "zealous", no human suffered any injuries during their forced evacuation.
  • Crossdresser: Occasionally, Charade Man's portrait will depict him as "Charade Woman" (in later updates, at least). But when selected and fought, he remains a Man. In the ending, he plays a woman in a play with Knight Man.
  • Counter Attack: This is pretty much the only way to hurt War Man, as he uses a shield that makes him invulnerable to damage, but puts it down when he gets up in front of you and attacks.
  • Deader Than Dead: In earlier versions of the game's plot, Justice Man and all of the Robot Masters, which contradicts quite a few aspects of the Mega Man Classic canon, and even is contradicted by the game itself with the rematch room. The latest version of the game changes this so that this trope only applies to Justice Man, and even gives an explanation of why the trope applies to that character and not the others.
  • Death Trap: Present in the first part of Crypt Man's level in a similar vein to Quick Man's stage's lasers. Terror Man's stage has one that looks like an inescapable spiked wall room that closes in. This is also the whole gimmick of Death Man's level.
  • Detachment Combat:
    • Virus Man can detach his upper body to attack you.
    • Plague Man loses his arms once he starts taking damage, which then become autonomous and leap around the place. He's formed from Pulse Man and the aforementioned Virus Man.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • Circuit Man's stage requires you to be able to shoot through walls for the lightbulb puzzle. When you play as one of the Rock Force members who can't, the lightbulb puzzle changes. Instead of shooting the lights to activate and deactivate certain blocks, they simply go on and off on their own.
    • Tube Tank, a midboss that appears in Pulse Man's stage and the final stage, is completely absent if playing as Bomb Man and Nitro Man, since it is fought while climbing two ladders, Bomb Man can't attack while holding onto a ladder, and both he and Nitro Man can't attack through walls.
    • The cutscene that plays after you defeat the last normal 8 bosses changes on depending who you defeat, as it determines who you rescue. The same goes for the conversations with the Final Boss, both after the battle against the Disc One Final Boss and before the final battle itself: The dialogue changes depending on who you fight them with.
  • Difficult but Awesome: Dive Man's Psycho Crusher move grants him a short period of invincibility. Learning to make full use of these invincibility frames can make Dive Man a far more effective character to play as, in or out of the water.
  • Difficulty Levels: This game offers a wide variety of how you want to play the game. There are settings for spike damage, level difficulty, number of checkpoints, invincibility frames, knockbacks, slide length, damage taken, and number of lives. Yes, you can make this game easy as a breeze, or you can make it Nintendo Hard.
  • Doppelgänger Attack: Sort of. Using Charade Clone, the clone will explode if you ram it into an enemy.
  • Easy Levels, Hard Bosses: Like in Mega Man & Bass, depending on which member of the Rock Force you're using, this trope can be in full effect. Certain members, such as Elec Man, can run circles around most of the levels in the game. However, if they're facing a Robot Master who isn't weak to their natural weapon, expect to be in for a long, slow battle against them, since their attacks only deal one damage, and most of them have a delay to them unlike Mega Man's Mega Buster, in addition to the fact that they can't use other Robot Master weapons like Mega Man.
  • Electrified Bathtub: Done in the water area of Shock Man's stage with electrical rods in the background. Make sure you're outside the water when they touch the water!
  • Escort Mission: Two stages, both added in April 2015:
    • Thrill Man's stage, where a large "balloon" of your character's head appears over your character. If it gets hit by anything harmful, the counter in its eyes goes down, and your character also dies if it hits 0. Shooting causes the balloon to move upwards.
    • War Man's stage has you escort an allied Hopping Machine, needed to activate switches at the end. It can be told to stop moving by shooting at it. However, it's very prone to falling into Bottomless Pits.
  • Expendable Clone: Charade Clone. If it touches anything harmful, it dies. If you press the attack button while controlling it, Mega Man teleports to the clone... and the clone explodes.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Justice Man undergoes this after being incapacitated by Shock Man. It wasn't the shock that damaged his thought circuits, however. At least in the newer version.
  • Fish People: The aptly-named Fish Man is designed after one.
  • Flawless Victory: Beating one of the bosses (except the final boss, or the boss rematches) without taking any damage in the fight will give you one of four parts required to obtain Beat.
  • Flunky Boss: Terror Man and Fish Man can summon spiders and exploding fish, respectively.
  • Fusion Dance: Done twice once you beat all the Robot Masters. Which robots fuse with which depends on who you defeat last. The second time The four Fused Masters fuse once more to form Death Man.
  • Gimmick Level: Almost all of the levels have some sort of gimmick to go along with the Robot Masters. Taken to its logical conclusion with Death Man who, true to their name, has a stage consisting solely of One-Hit Kill hazards.
  • The Grim Reaper: Death Man is essentially a robot version of this complete with cloak and scythe.
  • Grave Robbing: Invoked by two of the enemies in Crypt Man's stage, one being a bandit in a fedora that descends via a rope and the other a grave digger that throws stuff at you.
  • Hijacked By Wily: For once, no. Wily is not behind the events of this game at all.
  • Hitbox Dissonance: Averted in one case with Sniper Joes. While in most classic Mega Man games, Sniper Joe is completely invincible from the front while his shield is up (with the exception of being able to shoot past the shield in some titles), in Rock Force the shield's hitbox only includes the shield itself. As a result, the shield doesn't completely cover the Sniper Joe from the front, so you can kill a shielded Sniper Joe with the Mega Buster by shooting Joe in the head (very difficult, as only the top of the helmet is vulnerable) or the foot (much more exposed than the head).
  • Interesting Situation Duel: Pulse Man's miniboss, Tube Tank, is fought while anyone except Bomb Man or Nitro Man is on a ladder, similar to Gazamir from Mega Man Zero 2.
  • Interface Screw: Virus Man's level is filled with... well, viruses that can reverse your controls and force you to use uncharged buster shots if they hit you. Virus Man himself can also do it.
  • Invisibility Cloak: Crypt Cloak, which allows certain enemies to stop noticing Mega Man, allows Mega Man to walk on transparent blocks, as well as giving Mega Man a Shockwave Stomp.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: Whenever the stage select screen loads in later updates, Charade Man's portrait changes drastically. Also, when you select his stage, there's a chance that when his level loads and the Robot Master gets to do his opening animation, he misses his jump and falls off screen.
  • Let's Fight Like Gentlemen: If your health isn't full when facing Crypt Man in his level, he'll throw you a life tank to heal you up for a fair fight. May not happen on all difficulty levels.
  • Logical Weakness:
    • The electricity-using Shock Man is weak to a weapon called the Circuit Breaker.
    • Being a Robot Master that cloaks in darkness, Crypt Man wouldn't like the light from Photon Flare. Likewise, just because he's hiding in darkness doesn't mean he can't be tracked by a homing weapon like, say, Dive Man's Dive Missiles.
    • From the site's info, Pulse Man is based on a cardiovascular system which makes him similar to a heart. Hearts don't take well to a Virus Outbreak.
    • A minor inversion in that Dive Man is stronger in an underwater environment than he is outside it, which explains why he's also effective against a boss that fights underwater: Fish Man.
    • Polar Man (the second fortress boss) is weak to Fire Man for obvious reasons (fire melts snow).
    • Obviously Justice Man would be weak to Shock Gauntlet, given who shocked him at the beginning at the game. Elec Man is also strong against Justice Man, for the same reason.
    • Most of the regular Robot Masters have profiles on the official site, along with details pointing to their weaknesses. For example, the fuses on Fuse Man's explosives are apparently electronic in nature, which suggests that Fuse Man would be vulnerable to the Shock Gauntlet, which indeed he is.
  • Marathon Level: The final Fortress Stage in the updates, which one could probably claim rivals a normal Mega Man Unlimited stage in length. Besides having the gimmicks of all previous stages in it in some way, it also has a mid-boss, the Robot Master rematch fights, as well as the two forms of the Final Boss directly after it, in addition to generally being a long level regardless. Hope you stocked up on E-and-W-Tanks before hand!
    • Actually, the typical stage length in this game is close to those in Unlimited, but by default each stage has four checkpoints, which is an effective Anti-Frustration Feature for longer stages. And the length of the final fortress stage in this game doesn't come close to matching the extreme length of the fourth stage of Unlimited.
  • Mirror Match: Mega Man vs. Justice Man. Well, the first phase, anyway.
  • Multi-Armed and Dangerous: Terror Man, due to being based off of a spider.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • Charade Man's stage background contains several destroyed minibosses from throughout the classic games.
    • Terror Man has Gamma in the background (with a cracked forehead window to boot). It also features Zombiegs from Mega Man 7 and an instakill stage hazard in the form of fast-moving carcasses of Wily Machine 4.
    • The MM1 Robot Masters' personalities (and Cut Man's Wall Jump) are directly taken from Megaman Powered Up.
    • Justice Man's stage has statues of Splash Woman in the background.
    • Charade Man's midboss encounter has him copying the movements of a past Robot Master, specifically Quick Man, Shadow Man, Gemini Man, and Toad Man.
    • This game is structured very much like Mega Man 3. It has 8 main bosses, 4 additional bosses after you beat the main ones, and one last boss before going to the fortress stages.
    • All members of the Rock Force are Robot Masters that were created without any affiliation to Dr. Wily. More than half of them were created by Dr. Light, Dive Man was made by Dr. Cossack, and Knight Man and Nitro Man were created by people unknown. It's telling that this includes the Robot Masters from 3, which were a joint project of both Dr. Light and Dr. Wily at the time.
    • Fish Man was a Credits Gag in previous Mega Man games. Here, he's an actual boss.
  • Nightmare Fuel Station Attendant: In the "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue, Virus Man tries to cheer up an ill Dive Man with a story about another robot he knew getting sick... but cheerfully goes into very graphic detail in the process.
  • Noble Demon: Crypt Man who apparently wanted to minimize human injuries during this uprising and will only fight his opponent at full health as noted above.
  • Non-Standard Character Design: None of the Robot Masters look like anything from the Mega Man series, with the possible exception of Charade Man (and even then only in his sprite; his portrait makes him look like a thick necked luchador). Justice Man himself only barely qualifies. Their portraits have been updated in later versions, however, and they resemble actual Robot Masters a little more. The official illustrations by KarakatoDzo, on the other hand, make them look even more faithful in proportions and art style.
  • Nostalgia Level: Played with. The miniboss encounter in Charade Man's stage is Charade Man himself, but he will copy the movement pattern of two past Robot Masters. His boss hallway is also filled with enemies, not unlike the original game's boss hallways.
  • Not Me This Time: Wily is nowhere to be seen in this game. In fact, the only direct mention of him in the entire game is a brief reference at the beginning of the game.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: Death Man's stage is completely devoid of enemies until you reach his boss room.
  • Off Model: Some of the cutscene pictures look odd. Even with the later updates bringing them more on model, it's still rather apparent that whoever makes the cutscenes doesn't normally draw humanoid characters.
  • Oh Crap!: Be wary when Thrill Man has this expression, because that means he's noticed something you'll both have to dodge quickly.
  • Optional Boss: As of the 4/18/15 update, upon defeating the eight standard Robot Masters, depending on the last Robot Master you beat, you'll have to deal with four different Robot Masters. Defeat the robot master that is on your character's either four cardinal directions last, and you get the four Fusion Masters that were in the game since the start. Defeat the ones in one of the corners last, and you'll be treated to four different Fusion Masters that were added in the update. You can't fight all eight in a single playthrough, though you can use different save files to technically play through them all in a single playthrough.
  • Orbiting Particle Shield: The Virus Outbreak, which can expand on command to strike approaching enemies.
  • Order Versus Chaos: The reason why Mega Man and the Rock Force have to fight Justice Man. Justice Man wants freedom for all robots, but in doing so disrupts the order by causing a rebellion, and thus Mega Man and the Rock Force have to go after him.
  • Pinball Projectile: Your character's shots still retain their hitboxes after being deflected. Thus, it's possible to make trick shots. In fact, this is the gimmick for the intro level and Power Man's fight.
  • Plague Doctor: Plague Man's design is based off one.
  • Player-Guided Missile: The Phantom Fuse can be controlled by the player.
  • Playing with Fire: Flare Man and Thermo Man.
  • Power Copying: But of course. This is a Mega Man game after all.
  • Produce Pelting: The final area of Charade Man's stage has an area with a bunch of performing mooks, where a constant stream of exploding fruit is thrown on-screen at your character.
  • Promoted to Playable: The Rock Force. Originally, they just appeared in certain stages to help Mega Man pass some obstacles. A later update made them playable as you unlock them, each with their own unique abilities and strengths.
  • Pungeon Master: While quite a few members of the Rock Force exhibit this tendency, Justice Man seems to have an especially bad habit of throwing out puns in his conversations with the other members of the Rock Force. Even his last words contain a pun: "Clearly, there is no justice in this world."
  • Punny Name: The title is a pun on Mega Man's Japanese name, Rockman. Several weapons also have punny names, such as Circuit Breaker, Virus Outbreak, and Pulse Stopper.
  • Puzzle Boss: War Man is invincible while he has his shield up, and will always slowly inch his way over to you. No matter what you do or what member of the Rock Force you use, your attacks will always bounce off his shield. In order to damage him, you have to let him get right next to you, let him attack, dodge, then quickly counter attack before he puts his shield back up.
  • Real Time Weapon Change: Done in the same vein of Mega Man 9 and 10.
  • Recurring Boss: A notable example notwithstanding the Boss Rush. Shock Man is fought three times — first as the intro level boss, then as the boss of one of the 8 stages, and finally in the boss gauntlet.
    • Charade Man also qualifies, since he is fought twice in his own stage (since he acts as his own mini-boss with different tactics), then returns in the said boss gauntlet.
    • The Tube Tank miniboss is also fought in two stages: once in Pulse Man's stage, and again in the final fortress stage.
  • Red Herring: It turns out that it was not Shock Man's attack that damaged Justice Man's mental matrix, it was Justice Man's independent thought processes which did. At least it was in the new version.
  • Retcon: The update that introduced four optional Robot Masters to fight did a few, especially for the ending. Crypt Man specifically says no humans got hurt in the process of the Robot Masters taking over the areas, and it's implied it was their bosses specifically who were the ones treating them terribly instead of humanity at large. Similarly, Justice Man didn't have his personality fried by Shock Man. Rather, Justice Man's views were the result of Dr. Light trying out a new, more independent personality and thought process program that still had a few bugs in it, as Dr. Light said that Justice Man would have continued from Well-Intentioned Extremist to Jumping Off The Slippery Slope had Mega Man the Rock Force not done anything. (This is probably what necessitates the 30-year "testing period" for Mega Man X.) Speaking of which, Justice Man no longer views all of humanity as monsters in regards to robots or wants to make them pay. Rather, he becomes a Well-Intentioned Extremist who merely wants the mandated expiration date on robots cited in the story of Mega Man 9 abolished, as well as allow robots to have more freedom to choose their jobs outside of what they're programmed for, but slowly starts becoming more and more unhinged as time goes by. Regardless, Dr. Light manages to pull off his original goal during the ending in a much more peaceful manner, and while Mega Man is still rather saddened that Justice Man is beyond repair, the ending still ends on a high note. Many consider this a vast improvement on the original ending.
  • Robot War: A much more clear-cut case than usual for the series.
  • Sailor Earth: Justice Man, Dr. Light's newest creation.
  • Self-Duplication: Charade Man. You also get this ability from him, called Charade Clone.
  • Sequential Boss: Both Fish Man and Polar Man. The former rides in on the dragon fought earlier in the level, the latter rides in a large ice machine.
  • Series Continuity Error: Part of the reason that the Sudden Downer Ending in the earlier versions was so problematic. Mega Man laments about how he silenced the Robot Masters forever, even though the entire Rock Force is composed of robot masters whom he had previously defeated. Meanwhile, the idea of robots being denied choices flies in the face of the various quirks of the Robot Masters, how other robots in the series have been able to choose their own destiny in general, and how the game itself is about Mega Man and the members of the Rock Force choosing to form their own team of peacekeeping robots, despite Knight Man being the only one of them that is a dedicated combat robot, the rest being built with civilian applications in mind. The Author's Saving Throw helps remedy a lot of these issues.
  • Shock and Awe: The aptly-named Shock Man.
  • Shockwave Stomp: Crypt Man, Pulse Man, and Flare Man have these. The Crypt Cloak allows Mega Man to use this while cloaked. Shock Man's stomp isn't one per se, but every time he lands from a jump, the entire floor gets electrocuted. One of the enemies in Shock Man's stage does the same to similar floors.
  • Shout-Out:
    • In the first build's intro cutscene, Ryu can be seen as an anchorman. This is a shout out to Chun-Li's cameo at the beginning of Mega Man 9 where she became a reporter. This was only present on the first build; later versions replaced him with a different-looking anchor, albeit one that wasn't as Off Model as Ryu was.
    • One of the enemies at Crypt Man's stage is a grave robber with a fedora and an overall brown color scheme.
  • Simple, yet Awesome: Elec Man. He doesn't have as many abilities as other members of the Rock Force, but his default attack (the wide-reaching and hard-hitting Thunder Beam), his wall jump, and his raw speed are enough to make him possibly the strongest member of the group.
  • Smart Bomb: Photon Flare. It's basically Rain Flush with another name and appearance.
  • Spikes of Doom: Par for the course, but less lethal this time — the default setting makes them only deal half your maximum health instead of being a One-Hit Kill.
  • Stalked by the Bell: The final room in Fuse Man's stage before the boss corridor has a countdown timer on it. If the timer hits zero, random explosions start filling the room, making it more difficult to get through.
  • Stuff Blowing Up: Phantom Fuse and Circuit Breaker. The former especially, since it has the biggest blast radius in any Mega Man game, official or not. And Bomb Man, of course, is all over this trope.
  • Sudden Downer Ending: In earlier versions, Mega Man does an excellent Zero impersonation upon destroying Justice Man. The later versions changed the ending to something more uplifting and more reminiscent of Mega Man 9 and 10's Where Are They Now style of ending with the robot masters. The fortress bosses and Justice Man still don't get these scenes, the latter for obvious reasons...
  • Techno Wreckage: Terror Man's level.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Dive Man: Dive Man is, in most stages, one of the weakest members of the Rock Force. In the first fortress stage, however, he gets his chance to shine—it's a water level, and he's a lot more mobile and powerful in that environment.
  • Traintop Battle: Where the battle against Thrill Man takes place. Make sure to pay attention to when he notices something off screen, because otherwise you'll be in for a nasty surprise!
  • Underwater Boss Battle: Fish Man's battle takes place entirely underwater.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: Port Man, in addition to his level being rather puzzle-oriented, has teleporters that teleport you into the background and change it to the style of old Action-Adventure shooters from the Atari 2600 era. The tail end of the fight against Port Man also takes place in this style.
  • Utility Weapon: Several:
    • Shock Gauntlet can be used to grab items.
    • Phantom Fuse and Circuit Breaker can blow up certain walls.
    • Crypt Cloak makes you invisible to enemies and certain stage hazards. It also allows you to stand on invisible blocks scattered throughout the game.
    • Charade Clone allows you to grab items that are placed on spikes, as well as a free attempt or two at a section lined with spikes and/or pits.
  • Vaudeville Hook: A large one appears in Charade Man's stage in an area with a bunch of performing mooks. It'll try to pull your character towards the left of the screen into spikes.
  • Victory Fakeout: Downplayed. After you defeat a Robot Master, the usual power-absorbing animation will play, but after then, you still have to go through the other door to free the Rock Force members.
  • Video Game Set Piece: In the second half of the game, one member of the Rock Force will make a brief appearance in each of the levels — Elec Man in Terror Man's stage, Tornado Man in Plague Man's stage (two appearances, in fact), Nitro Man in Power Man's stage, Bomb Man in Flare Man's stage, Knight Man in Death Man's stage, Dive Man in Fish Man's stage, Fire Man in Polar Man's stage, and Cut Man in the final stage. Note that all this is not present on the first build, nor is there any assistance in the new levels of the April 2015 build.
  • Villain Has a Point: It's pointed out by Dr. Light in the newer ending that despite the villain's cause being the product of an unstable mind, it doesn't mean he was wrong—far from it. The problem only lay in how the villain tried to go about it.
  • Walking Spoiler: Justice Man is revealed to be the one behind the events of the game, having decided to ensure freedom for him and all robots by starting a rebellion against humans and capturing the Rock Force.
  • The Walls Are Closing In: Partway through Terror Man's level, a set of spiked walls will slowly close in on your character while firing spikes from both sides. To survive, you must stay in the middle until the floor opens up. Quite fitting for a level whose boss is called Terror Man.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Justice Man becomes this after his face-heel turn above. His goal is to ensure freedom for him and all robots, by starting a rebellion against humans and capturing the Rock Force.
  • Wham Shot: After you defeat all of the rogue Robot Masters and get informed of a strange phenomenon by Dr. Light, you see their portraits fuse with each other in the stage select screen.
  • "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue: The ending added in the update with the four optional robot masters added this, showing that the Robot Masters Mega Man and the Rock Force battled are alive and kicking, and are being much more fairly treated by humans, no longer being forced to be scrapped once the mandatory expiration date is hit and being free to choose jobs outside of their original programing. Notably, while some do stick to their jobs like Charade Man continuing to be an actor, albeit with more creative freedom on the characters he plays, Circuit Man becomes the new owner of the Robot Museum instead of his continued job in electronics, and Virus Man helps assist a new deep sea expedition with Dive Man, as well as unintentionally giving him sea sickness in the process, and Crypt Man no longer repels grave robbers, instead being the tour guide of a horror-themed amusement park, which he finds far less depressing and enjoys a lot more.
  • The Worf Effect: Happens to the entire Rock Force save for Mega Man, since they disappeared during the investigation on the robot attacks. It turns out that Justice Man deliberately planned for this to happen, partly to prevent them from finding out his true goals.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle: As always, don't expect the game to end just yet after defeating the Fusion Masters.
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