Trivia / Toy Story

As a series, these films provide examples of:

  • Actor Allusion:
    • This is Laurie Metcalf's second role as a woman with a son named Andy.
    • In the first movie, Woody is crushed by a Binford toolbox (Buzz's voice actor Tim Allen starred in Home Improvement, where Binford was the sponsor of a Show Within a Show) and Mr. Potato Head's hockey puck one liner (Mr. Potato Head is voiced by insult comic Don Rickles, known for calling anyone he insults "hockey puck").
    • In the second movie, Buzz's reaction to seeing the Buzz Lightyear utility belt sounded very much like a Tim "The Tool Man" Taylor reaction.
    • In the third movie, Lotso is generally a corrupt enforcer. His voice actor, Ned Beatty, played a corrupt sheriff, who's much of a Jerkass like Lotso, in the 1973 film White Lightning, which happened to be Beatty's second film role following his film debut a year earlier in Deliverance. It can also be considered ironic as throughout the film, Lotso addressed Woody as "Sheriff." Also, interestingly, both said films that featured Ned Beatty as the Big Bad are favorites of director Quentin Tarantino (Tarantino selected White Lightning for the First Quentin Tarantino Film Fest in Austin, Texas, 1996 and incorporated the film's music by Charles "A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)" Bernstein's in his films Kill Bill and Inglourious Basterds, while Toy Story 3 was placed at the top position in Tarantino's list of favorite films of 2010).
    • In a commercial featuring the characters for the USPS, Hamm is dressed as a mailman. Hamm is voiced by John Ratzenburger, who played another mailman, Cliff Clavin from Cheers.
    • The Sergeant of the Bucket of Soldiers is played by R. Lee Ermey.
    • In "Toy Story of Terror", Carl Weathers plays a soldier toy whose friends have been snatched by seemingly invisible monster.
  • AFI's 100 Years... Series:
  • Defictionalization: Prominent with Woody and Buzz, but every toy that didn't exist in real life before the films were made has received this treatment.
    • At least two real life Pizza Planet restaurants have been built, based on the beloved eatery from the original film.
    • Annoyingly averted with Buzz Lightyear the doll itself until the latest iteration, even though they spell out exactly what's in him right in the first movie. Every Buzz Lightyear toy to come out for the first two films only had at most three of the features mentioned in the commercial, and missed several from the films. Thinkway's latest attempt neglects only Karate Chop Action, due to the mechanics required necessitating a choice between it and the far more used spring-loaded wings. They did however make a different version of Buzz specifically for the Karate Chop Action.
  • Demand Overload: That line in Toy Story 2 about "short-sighted retailers" underestimating the popularity of Buzz Lightyear action figures and the initial run completely sold out in a few days? That actually happened; Thinkway did not expect the film to be such a smash-hit, and produced fewer toys than the demand turned out to be. The sequel lampshades this by having Al's Toy Barn catch up with demand by devoting an entire aisle to Buzz Lightyear.
  • Executive Meddling:
    • Mattel would not allow the first film to have a Barbie doll because they didn't want Barbie to be seen with a definitive personality. The writers reworked it so that way a Little Bo Peep figurine would be the love interest instead. However, after the huge success of the first one, Mattel allowed her to appear in the sequels.
    • Then Disney exec Jeffrey Katzenberg wanted the first film to be "edgy", which resulted in Woody being a jerkass and a heavy reliance on insult humour. This backfired immensely; when a story reel was shown to Roy Disney, on what has been dubbed "Black Friday" by the production team, he called it "one of the worst things I've ever seen." The Pixar boys were left alone to write the movie they wanted to write, and the rest is history. Not to mention that the film's production was almost canceled as a result of Katzenberg getting exactly what he asked for and not liking it. Some people say that Pixar intentionally made the reel bad in hopes of changing the Disney execs minds. It worked almost too well; the Disney execs nearly killed the movie outright, and it took a drastically revised script to convince them to give it a second chance (Katzenberg didn't stick around for the end product; this is the only Pixar film he's been involved with). This video describes the ordeal the writers had to deal with. This ironically was the second Disney "Black Friday" that Katzenberg managed to find himself in a starring role in; a different "Black Friday" where he hit the Reset Button on Aladdin's production to rework "a lot of movie" that he hated and jettison a character or two had happened about two to three years earlier.
    • And don't forget the reason why Pixar ended up merging with Disney in the first place.
    • In the first film, the "Strange Things" montage was not originally planned. Woody's world was going to change more gradually over a few scenes. Then Tom Schumacher, a VP at Disney, suggested it be done in a montage, to which John Lasseter thought, "Ding! I could have had a V8!" and put a montage in.
  • Exiled from Continuity: After Sony Pictures secured the rights to make a movie based off Barbie, both Barbie and Ken could no longer appear in the series thanks to contractual obligations regarding said movie. This is why neither character showed up in both Toy Story of Terror! and Toy Story That Time Forgot, and the likelihood of them appearing in further installments (including Toy Story 4) is slim.
  • Fan Nickname: Another name for Legs, the fish hook toy with female legs? Hooker.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Slinky got a new voice actor for the third movie since Jim Varney, his original voice actor, died of lung cancer shortly after the release of the second film. You can hardly tell the difference, however.
    • This may also happen for Don Rickles as Mr. Potato Head in Toy Story 4, following the actor's passing in 2017.
    • Also bound to happen with Sarge and Chuckles following the deaths of R. Lee Ermey and Bud Luckey.
    • In Sweden: For the third film, only Woody and Andy's mom had new voice actors. Everyone else retained their voices from the previous film (yes, even Andy).
    • In Mexico:
      • Woody's original voice actor Carlos Segundo left over a salary disagreement with Disney and he was replaced by Arturo Mercado Jr. (the real-life son of Hamm's Mexican voice actor Arturo Mercado) for the third film.
      • Also bound to happen with Rex following the tragic death of Jesús Barrero.
    • In Japan, Hamm and Slinky will receive new voice actors for Toy Story 4 following the deaths of Chikao Ohtsuka and Ichirō Nagai.
    • In Spain:
      • Veteran actress Elsa Fábregas passed away in 2008, so Ana Ángeles García replaced Mrs. Potato in the third film and the subsuquent shorts. Voice director Antonio Lara considered first actress María Dolores Gispert to voice Mrs. Potato as heard in the teaser of Toy Story 3 but the role went to García.
      • Raúl Rojo replaced Nacho Aldeguer as Andy, as well as Pepa Castro for Rosa María Hernández as Mrs. Davis in the third film. Hernández only returned for the trailers but not for the final film.
      • Marta Barbará and Victoria Ramos did the voices for the Barbie dolls in the second film but Barbie is voiced in the third by Yolanda Mateos. Considering the incarnation of Barbie in Toy Story 3 is different from the others is quite reasonable, however they all have been voiced in English by Jodi Benson.
      • Luis Marco, who voiced the Sergeant in the first two films, was replaced for unknown reasons by Jorge García Insúa in Toy Story 3. He was heard in the teaser but did not make it in the final cut.
      • Artur Palomo and Luis Manuel Martín Díaz have been the new voices for Woody and Buzz in videogames and other related media after Toy Story 3.
      • José Luis Gil, who is already Buzz's main voice actor, had replaced flamenco singer Diego "El Cigala" as the voice of Spanish Buzz in the short Hawaiian Vacation but maintaining the thick Andalusian accent of the former.
      • Antonio Villar and Conchi López substitute Emilio Gutiérrez Caba and Ana Milán as Mr. Pricklepants and Dolly respectively in the Toy Story Toons shorts probably due to the latters' Celebrity Voice Actor status.
      • Claudi García passed away in 2015, so Hamm will receive a new voice actor by the time Toy Story 4 is released.
    • In Brazil: Woody's voice actor in the first film, Alexandre Lippiani died before the second movie. For the rest of the franchise, he was replaced by Marco Ribeiro.
    • In Italy:
      • Andy has different voices in all the movies: Lorenzo De Angelis in the first, Alessio Ward in the second, and in the third he's voiced by Arturo Valli as a child and Matteo Leoni as a teen.
      • The Pizza Planet aliens also changed voices from movie to movie: We don't know the voice actor for the first movie, but in the second they were voiced by Mirko Mazzanti, Luigi Ferraro and Michele Di Carlo, while in the third movie Carlo Cosolo voices all of them.
      • Barbie is voiced by Cristina Giachero in the second movie and by Claudia Gerini in the third. (Also, in the original trailer for the third movie she was voiced by Emanuela Pacotto, her official voice actress since 2006)
      • Fabrizio Frizzi, who voiced Woody in all the Toy Story films and offshoots, died on March 26, 2018 of a brain hemorrhage, so the character will get a new voice actor by the time Toy Story 4 will be released.
  • Playing Against Type: Wallace Shawn, better known for playing arrogant or even bullying characters in other movies (including a future Pixar movie), as the anxiety-ridden Rex.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: A primary reason the developers decided to make the movie about toys in the first place was due to the limits of mid-90s CGI. Since the technology made everything look plastic, they decided to have the characters be made of plastic.
  • Refitted for Sequel: The dream sequence from Toy Story 2 and the idea of opening on a Show Within a Show version of Buzz Lightyear were scenes that had originally been planned from the first film.
  • Sequel Gap: Toy Story 3 came out eleven years after the second. Toy Story 4 is going to come out nine years later.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • Part 2 was originally meant as a low-budget straight to video release, as per usual of Disney at the time. However, the Pixar leadership decided not to sully their studio's reputation by releasing an inferior movie, then petitioned to make it a full-featured theatrical release instead. Disney was so impressed by what they already had that they gave the green light for a theatrical release.
    • The original Toy Story 3 developed by Circle 7, which was about Buzz getting shipped to Taiwan due to a massive recall, and his friends having to go save him. In most regards, it was a Recycled Script of the second film, only with the toys going to save Buzz instead of Woody.
      • There's also a script floating around the Internet for a Toy Story 3 that would have focused on Woody and some of the toys being stored in Andy's grandmother's house rather than sent to a daycare center (and the characters who weren't in the third movie would have been in this one, like Bo Peep and Lenny the wind-up binoculars).

Tropes in the first Toy Story

  • Acting for Two: Hamm, the aliens, and the robot in Pizza Planet are all voiced by Arturo Mercado in the Mexican Spanish dub.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: Woody shouting "Buzz, look! An alien!" is often misquoted as "Look, Buzz! There's an alien!" It didn't help that official toys released as tie-ins had a voice clip of Woody shouting that wrong line.
  • Breakthrough Hit: Toy Story put Pixar on the map as one of the industry's top animation teams. It was also an example for CGI animation as a whole, as it provided proof that the format could be widely-accessible (and has since led to CGI becoming the dominant form of animation).
  • Clumsy Copyright Censorship: In the first movie, Sid is stopped from torturing Woody when his mother announces his Pop-Tarts are ready. Sometimes, when the film is aired on television, her entire line is silenced.
  • Creator Cameo: The Pixar Regulars are the chorus of manly voices during the Buzz Lightyear commercial.
  • Defictionalization: This full-length recreation of the film—in real life, with Pixar's blessing.
  • Dueling Movies: With the Disney Animated Canon's own Pocahontas. It proved to be a little more destructive than one might have thought; see "Genre-Killer" below.
  • Genre-Killer:
    • Much to creator John Lasseter's chagrin, Toy Story was one of the movies that contributed to the idea that hand-drawn animation is dead—not helped by the fact that it debuted the same year as Disney's Pocahontas, which was considered to be the beginning of the end of the company's renaissance, as well as subsequent box office dropoffs of other hand-drawn features near the end of The Renaissance Age of Animation (it didn't help that the negative publicity surrounding Jeffrey Katzenberg's ejection from the company earlier cast a shadow on the whole situation). The medium was gradually phased out over the next decade and Disney's own attempts to keep it alive have proved fruitless.
    • It was also the genre killer for the "kid empowerment" genre of films that seemed to dominate theaters in the early-mid 90's. After Home Alone, studios everywhere wanted a piece of that pie and made films that were Home Alone ripoffs (e.g. 3 Ninjas) and/or placed kids in absurdly powerful situations (e.g. Cop and a Half). Then Toy Story, which featured a perfectly normal kid doing perfectly normal things, was released to bigger critical and commercial acclaim than the other previously-mentioned films combined, and put the skids on "kid empowerment"; such films have been scarce since then.
  • List of Films You Should See By the Age of 14: #8
  • Mean Character, Nice Actor: Despite Woody and Buzz's rivalry and resentment to each other in the film, their voice actors Tom Hanks and Tim Allen are really good friends in real life. This is especially considering that, prior to the original film's shutdown during production, Hanks was said to have been appalled by just how heartless Woody was.
  • Old Shame
    • The infamous "Black Friday" cut of the film. John Lasseter never speaks of it without first burying his face in his hands.
    • While still proud of the film itself, the creators have acknowledged just how poorly the computer graphics have aged, going as far as to call it their "ugliest film.""
  • Real-Life Relative: In the Mexican Spanish dub, Actress Karla Falcón and her mother Olga Donna-Dío provided the respective voices for Hanna and her mother, respectively.
  • The Red Stapler: Done with every single character in the film. Particularly Buzz Lightyear, whose action figure, with Toy Story just a few short weeks in theaters, became such a hot commodity he was sold on the black market.
  • Serendipity Writes the Plot
    • In the early 1990s, everything CG was still kinda plastic... so Pixar did a film starring plastic characters.
    • The reason Mrs. Davis is a single mother was simply because the budget wouldn't allow for another human character to be designed and rendered (even the brief glimpse of Sid's dad is just a disembodied arm and leg).
  • Throw It In!: In the gag where Buzz gasps for air after Woody accidentally opens his helmet, Woody was supposed to look around, concerned. However, at a screening of the layout version, John Lasseter burst out laughing at how the expressionless stand-in model of Woody looked so bored, and the gag was changed to Woody impatiently waiting for Buzz to finish his spiel.
  • Troubled Production: Jeffrey Katzenberg, then creative director of Disney, originally pushed for a more "edgy" film, with snarky, in-your-face attitude and a generous helping of jokes that only grown-ups would get, which the Pixar people, never having made a feature before, sheepishly agreed to (they deny any rumors that this was done on purpose in order to make Katzenberg look like an idiot). The result, known as the "Black Friday reel" after the day it was screened on, was a thoroughly unpleasant animatic with Woody being written as a cynical jerk who verbally abused the other toys and even tried to kill Buzz! Had John Lasseter not asked for another chance to make the movie without any interference from the studio, the film would never have been made at all.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • We of course have the "Black Friday" reel that was screened for Katzenberg and Roy Disney, as seen above. That one got shot down in the end.
    • In the topic about dubs, in the Japanese version, Koichi Yamadera and Tessho Genda were considered to voice both Woody and Buzz respectively. Instead, they were voiced by the Japanese comedians Toshiaki Karasawa and George Tokoro respectively. This becomes being ironic since Mr. Genda voiced Zurg in the Buzz Lightyear: Star Command animated series, who is Buzz's sworn enemy.
    • In the Mexican Spanish version, Carlos Segundo auditioned to voice Buzz, but Francisco Colmenero requested that he needed an actor to provide the voice of Woody. Segundo thought he didn't need to voice the character since he has a deep voice, but auditioned for it anyway. A few months later, when Segundo returned to dub the film, it turned out that he was cast as the voice of Woody instead of Buzz, who was voiced by José Luis Orozco.
    • Woody was written with Paul Newman's voice in mind, but the budget didn't allow for it. (Though it's not as if Pixar gave up on that idea forever.)
    • Bill Murray, Jim Carrey, and Billy Crystal were all considered for the role of Buzz Lightyear. Crystal turned down the part and regretted it so much he jumped at the chance to do Monsters, Inc. when Pixar came calling again.
    • Originally, a Barbie doll in a Pimped-Out Dress who acted like Sarah Connor from the Terminator movies was supposed to have been Woody's love interest after she rescued him and Sid's mutant toys from Scud the dog. Mattel refused to give Pixar the rights to use Barbie (fearing that the movie wouldn't be successful and sales of Barbie dolls would plummet because of the movie's supposed failure), so Woody's love interest was changed to the Little Bo Peep figurine and Woody hatched a plan with Sid's mutant toys to trick Scud the dog during the escape to the backyard. It wasn't until the first Toy Story became popular enough for a big-screen sequel (and a third installment) that Mattel decided to let Pixar use Barbie as a character.
    • Originally Sid was going to blow up a G.I. Joe, but Hasbro objected to this use of their property and so the Joe was replaced with an original toy, Combat Carl.
    • The Buzz Lightyear toy commercial was originally planned as a cheesy 50s-stye TV ad, but Tom Schumacher thought a more modern ad would work better, resulting in the Totally Radical assault on the senses which made it into the final film.
    • Buzz was originally going to be delivered via FedEx as a last-minute birthday present from Andy's father, implying that his parents were divorced as justification for him not being in the movie (in reality, the film simply didn't have a budget to include him).
    • In the Brazilian version, Malu Mader was initially approached to do Bo Peep's voice, but her schedule prevented that. She later went on to do the voice of Neera in the Brazilian version of Dinosaur.

Tropes in the video game:

  • Urban Legend of Zelda: It was long rumored that, in the first video game, you could play as Buzz via cheat code. This was never confirmed (or denied).

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