Trivia: Rugrats

  • Actor Allusion: In "Stu Gets A Job" Stu mentions The Rockford Files is coming on. Jack Riley, Stu's voice actor guest starred on an episode of The Rockford Files.
  • Adored by the Network: From 1998 to 2003, they were pretty much the forerunners of Nickelodeon back in the day until Spongebob Squarepants came along.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!: Due to a certain image circulating the Internet, Many fans believe that there's a scene from "Grandpa's Bad Bug" where Grandpa talks about playing Russian Roulette. The actual dialogue was just Grandpa telling Stu and Didi that he was sick, Didi offers to take him to the doctor but he tells her he just wants to sleep it off. The dialogue in the aforementioned image is lifted from an episode of King of the Hill.
  • Breakthrough Hit: For Klasky-Csupo and Nickelodeon (though credit should also be given to Doug and Ren and Stimpy as those two shows also helped Nickelodeon gain fame in the 1990s).
  • Composers: Mark Mothersbaugh was the sole composer for the first season; Denis M. Hannigan took over for seasons 2 and 3; Mark Mothersbaugh returned for the revival in 1996, and co-composed with his brother, Robert Mothersbaugh until the end of the series.
  • Creator Backlash: Up until the movie, Arlene Klasky hated Angelica and following the episode "The Trial" she complained to the writers that the babies were starting to act too old for their age.
  • Cross-Dressing Voices: Played straight in the English cast, as all the male babies are voiced by women. In contrast, most foreign dubs actually have voice actors that match the gender of the characters, as heard in the French dub
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: Pay close attention to the whip-pan at the beginning of the Chanukah Special. One might see a caricature of Elvis.
  • Hey, It's That Voice!: Cree Summer portrayed Susie (though some episodes have E.G. Daily as Susie. See The Other Darrin), and you can't miss Tony Jay's baritone as Dr. Lipschitz.
  • In Memoriam: The episode "Lady Luck", where Grandpa Lou plays a major role, is dedicated to his voice actor David Doyle, who passed away before the episode aired.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: the show got tons of VHS releases, but of course those are all now out of print and only a select few episodes were ever released to DVD. As of 2014 however, the complete series is available on DVD exclusively at Amazon and can be purchased on iTunes and Amazon Instant Video.
  • Missing Episode:
    • "Cuffed/The Blizzard" from Season 3 was pulled from US reruns by the mid 2000's, probably over concern of small children playing with handcuffs. It still aired in other countries and is available on DVD and iTunes.
    • Because of music licensing issues with the song "Vacation" by The Go-Go's, the Season 4 episode "Vacation" was rarely aired on TV and is not available on iTunes or Amazon Instant Video. However, it is included on the Season 4 DVD.
  • Name's the Same: Susie's mom, Lucy Carmichael, has the same name as Lucille Ball's character from The Lucy Show.
    • Kira is in no way similar to Light Yagami.
    • In the episode, "Opposites Attract", Tommy and Chuckie meet two kids who have personalities similar to theirs; a girl named Sam, and a boy named Freddie. They have the same names as Carly Shay's two best friends.
  • The Other Darrin: After David Doyle's death, Joe Alaskey took over as Grandpa Lou's voice actor.
    • Also, when Christine Cavanaugh — the original voice of Chuckie Finster — left the show as she decided to retire from voice acting, she was replaced by Nancy Cartwright (from The Simpsons). Try as she might with the role, Ms. Cartwright's take on Chuckie made him sound like Ralph Wiggum, which didn't sit well with a lot of fans.
    • For unknown reasons, Chuckie was played by Candi Milo in two video games instead of Nancy Cartwright.
    • "The Last Babysitter" had E.G. Daily (normally the voice for Tommy) voice Susie Carmichael rather than Cree Summer.
    • Susie's siblings change voice actors often.
    • In the Japanese dub, there's a different voice cast between the characters from the TV series and the movies.
    • The Other Marty: Elizabeth Daily voices Tommy in all media, except in the pilot where he was voiced by Tami Holbrook.
  • Talking to Himself: Phil, Lil, and their mother, Betty, were all voiced by Kath Soucie. Also, Michael Bell voiced both Drew (Angelica's dad) and Chaz (Chuckie's dad). Didi and her mother were both voiced by Melanie Chartoff.
    • Don't forget about Larry and Steve (Scott Menville).
    • In Mexico, it's Dil and Susie. In Sweden, Tommy and Angelica.
  • Uncanceled: The show originally ended in 1994 with little fanfare, only for the network to notice that reruns consistently had the same ratings as the first run episodes. It got a reprieve at the last minute in 1995 and was brought back in 1997. It was officially cancelled in 2004 however.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: The first three seasons are chock full of nineties references, such as Siskel & Ebert. The cell phone Charlotte is seen frequently using is also noticeably out of date.
  • What Could Have Been: Originally 20th Century Fox had a deal with Nickelodeon to release movies of the Nicktoons in 1993 but this fell through. The Rugrats Movie did come out in 1998 through Paramount after Viacom's acquisition of the studio, but whether the plot details were the same remains unknown.
    • In the original pilot Lou's name was Stu Pickles Sr.
    • There was a rumor that if Rugrats Go Wild was successful, then a fourth movie would've been made with the characters in their grown forms.
    • After Christine Cavanaugh retired from voice acting, Candi Milo was considered for Chuckie's new voice actress, even playing him in two video games. However, Klasky-Csupo brought Nancy Cartwright in instead, thinking that having a more "famous" voice actress off of The Simpsons would bring in more viewers as the popularity of Rugrats was slowly starting to wane.
  • Write Who You Know: Tommy was based on Arlene Klasky and Gábor Csupó's son, and was named after co-creator Paul Germain's son, Thomas.
    • Angelica was based off a bully from Paul Germain's own childhood.