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Sequel Song
When a band releases a song that could be considered a direct or spiritual sequel to a previous song of theirs. The song is usually in the same key as the original, and may borrow lyrics or music from it.


Examples:

  • Metallica followed up The Unforgiven with The Unforgiven II six years later. And then came The Unforgiven III, eleven years after II. The original and II share some lyrics, and a horn intro at the beginning. III has neither, but it's still easy to see the connection.
  • Thrice had "The Melting Point of Wax", sung from Icarus's perspective. Then, they released "Daedalus", which is the same story, except from Daedalus's point of view. "Daedalus" was written after Dustin Kensrue, the lead singer/songwriter had children, and his view of the Icarus myth changed with it. Both songs represent different stages of the band: "The Melting Point of Wax" represents when you're young and think you can do anything and live forever. "Daedalus" represents when you're a father and will do anything to protect your kids.
  • Symphony X: ''The Accolade'' follows the story of a crusader, and it is ''AWESOME!!!'' Accolade II follows his son. In keeping with the nature of the genre, multiple themes from the original surface again.
  • Marilyn Manson's concept albums obviously follow this, but there's also "Coma Black" for "Coma White", although, because they're part of the triptych, which is listened to in opposite order of release, "Coma White" is this for "Coma Black".
  • Slipknot did this with Vermilion and Vermilion Part 2. The first is typical Slipknot fare, while the sequel is a mellow acoustic ballad. Interestingly, both songs are on the same album.
  • Dream Theater has Metropolis, Pt. I: The Miracle and the Sleeper, and Metropolis Pt. 2: Scenes from a Memory. The second song is notable for lasting a whole album which is separated into twelve tracks, 9 "scenes," and two acts.
    • "The Mirror" is seen as a prequel to the Twelve-Step Suite, and in Systematic Chaos you have "In The Presence of Enemies" I and II.
  • Tool's triple song set of "Disposition", "Reflection", and "Triad" on their Lateralus album was originally intended to be one very long song. Due to its unwieldy length even by Tool's standards, the band was forced to split it into three individual songs with each acting as an introduction, middle, and ending for a very metaphor-heavy narrative.
    • A clearer example would be the songs "Wings for Marie (Pt 1)" and "10,000 Days (Wings Pt 2)" on their 10,000 Days album.
  • Axel Rudi Pell are have done this with their album The Crest, which features a track called Dark Waves of the Sea (Oceans of Time Pt. II: The Dark Side), which is a sequel to their 1998 track, Oceans of Time. It has a similar, but more guitar-heavy chorus, and a similar solo section to the first song.
    • "World of Confusion (The Masquerade Ball Pt. II)" is the same for "The Masquerade Ball".
    • ARP often unintentionally does this as well. Seeing as how Axel writes all the band's music, riffs and solos are bound to crop up again occasionally. There's an insanely catchy riff that appears (with slight variations) on the tracks Wild Cat, Pay the Price, and Buried Alive. All these songs are years apart.
  • Helloween are very fond of this. Halloween, Keeper of the Seven Keys and King for a Thousand Years found on the albums Keeper of the Seven Keys Pt.1, Keeper of the Seven Keys Pt.2 and Keeper of the Seven Keys: The Legacy respectively are all considered sequels. While Halloween doesn't share a plot with the other two songs, it's still considered part of the band's "Keeper Trilogy", being a 10+ minute long multi-part Epic. An orchestral medley of all three songs was made for the band's 2010 compilation album Unarmed. It's an interesting case in that King for a Thousand Years was released 17 years after Keeper.
    • The song Occasion Avenue could also be related to the "Keeper Trilogy". It doesn't share any lyrical themes or music, but it's a long, multi-part song that contains samples of the Trilogy.
  • Meat Loaf's album Bat out of Hell had two sequels, though only Bat Out of Hell II was written entirely by original Bat songwriter Jim Steinman.
  • Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells II.
  • The Beatles' "Glass Onion" could be seen as a sequel to "Strawberry Fields" and "I Am the Walrus"... or just a Mind Screw. It also references "Fool on the Hill," "Lady Madonna," "Fixing a Hole," "There's a Place," "I'm Looking Through You," and "Within You and Without You."
    • Two of George Harrison's most popular Beatles songs were "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" and "Here Comes The Sun". During his solo career he wrote and recorded "This Guitar (Can't Keep From Crying)" and "Here Comes The Moon".
  • Peter Schilling's "Major Tom" is an unofficial remake of David Bowie's "Space Oddity", to which the official sequel would be "Ashes to Ashes".
  • Buddy Holly, "Peggy Sue Got Married". Which was released posthumously, yet.
  • "Judy's Turn to Cry" by Lesley Gore is a sequel to the same singer's "It's My Party".
  • There was a sequel to "The Devel Went Down to Georgia" called "The Devil Came Back to Georgia"
  • Britney Spears' "Stronger" contains the line "My loneliness ain't killing me no more", a reference to Baby One More Time.
    • "Inside Out" also references the latter, asking her lover to "hit me one more time."
  • Eminem's "Kim" was a prequel to "97 Bonnie and Clyde".
  • An Orthodox Jewish band called Journeys had a song called "The Ninth Man" on their debut album in the '80s. Almost 20 years later, on Journeys IV, they had a sequel called "The Ninth Man II", which was from the point of view of the same characters... 20 years later.
  • "Bad Day" by REM is a sequel to their previous song, "It's the End of the World as We Know It".
  • George Formby did an entire series of songs about a Mr. Wu, which apparently started with "Chinese Laundry Blues" and included "Mr. Wu's a Window Washer Now", "Mr. Wu's an Air Raid Warden Now" and "Mr. Wu's In the Air Force." (Listening to these all in a row is not recommended.)
  • Harry Chapin wrote the aptly-titled "Sequel" as one of these to "Taxi."
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers: "Dani California" to "Californication".
    • And in between those, Dani shows up in "By the Way".
    Dani the girl is
    Singing songs to me
    Beneath the marquee
    Overload
  • Linkara's History of Power Rangers videos mentioned that the Power Rangers Zeo theme is, appropriately enough, a sequel song to the theme of Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers, which includes some parts of the original.
  • Napoleon XIV: "They're Coming to Take Me Away Ha, Haa!" and "They're Coming to Get Me Again"
  • Kansas's "Icarus: Borne On Wings Of Steel" was followed up years later by "Icarus II".
  • Rush ended their album "A Farewell To Kings" with the song "Cygnus X-I Part I" and began their next album, "Hemispheres" with the followup "Cygnus X-I Part II".
    • Rush also has Fear parts I, II, III and IV, spread out over decades of albums, with the first three released in reverse order.
  • Tommy and Gina from Bon Jovi's "Living On A Prayer" made a return appearance in "It's My Life". As well as the introduction.
  • Elton John recorded "Mona Lisas And Mad Hatters" in 1972, and "Mona Lisas And Mad Hatters, Part 2" in 1988.
  • Jethro Tull followed "Christmas Song" in 1970 and "Another Christmas Song" in 1989.
  • The Ramones have "The Return of Jackie and Judy", a sequel to "Judy Is a Punk", and "This Ain't Havana", a sequel to "Havana Affair". And arguably "Cretin Family" also qualifies as a sequel/inversion of "We're a Happy Family" (that references the title of "Cretin Hop").
  • Ben Folds has "Fred Jones, Part 2", a sequel to his Ben Folds Five song "Cigarette" (which also had Fred Jones as a main character).
  • Mr. Bungle had "Sleep (Part II): Carry Stress in the Jaw" and "Sleep (Part III): Phlegmatics" on Disco Volante, leading fans to wonder where the hell "Sleep (Part I)" was: It turns out Trevor Dunn, who had written both songs, had retroactively decided that the earlier song "Slowly Growing Deaf" was part one. The three aren't directly connected, but share the theme of an illness affecting a specific body part.
  • Bobby "Boris" Pickett recorded several sequels to the novelty hit "Monster Mash", including "Monster Swim", "Sinister Stomp", and even "Monster's Holiday."
  • Ice-T's "Midnight" has a spoken intro that more or less sets it up as a sequel to his earlier song "6 'N The Mornin'". The very last line reveals that it's more of a prequel song though, since "6 'N The Mornin'" begins with police at the door at 6 A.M. and "Midnight" ends with the exact same situation.
  • Everything Else's "Fool" is the sequel to "If You Loved Her", which makes "If You Loved Her" a more depressing song.
  • Rihanna recorded "Love the Way You Lie Part 2" for her album "Loud". It's a sequel to Eminem's "Love the Way You Lie", which Rihanna sang the chorus of.
  • The Vines had "Autumn Shade" then "Autumn Shade II" followed by both "A.S. III" and "A.S.4 (Autumn Shade 4)" all on separate albums.
  • French Singer Renaud has a song called "Les aventures de Gérard Lambert" (Gerard Lambert's adventures). It also has a later song, called "Le retour de Gérard Lambert" (Gérard Lambert returns). Of course, both songs share the main character (in the first, he is trying to fix his bike, and in the second he is driving to meet a girl, only to find a travestite. He ends both songs by hitting people)
    • Same singer also has two songs, "Où c'est qu'j'ai mis mon flingue" (Where did I put my gun) and "J'ai retrouvé mon flingue" (I found my gun again) where he rants about various things and more various things in the sequel.
  • Rap group Atmosphere has a few:
    • The song "Mille Fell Off The Fire Escape" is a direct sequel to the song "Millie Pulled A Pistol On Santa" by De La Soul. The former pays homage to the latter by using the same backing music as a sample.
    • The song "Hair", in which rapper Slug details the story of a fan trying to seduce him at a bar. The song progresses through the night as Slug and the girl go back and forth, with the fan's advances eventually winning over Slug. They get into her car, and as they're driving to her place, the song abruptly ends with the following:
    Lindale Avenue on the way to her place
    Her drunk ass turns to look at me and she says
    "You're so beautiful, from the hair to the soul
    I can't believe that I never met you before
    It feels like I've been waiting for you my whole life"
    She missed the red light, we hit a pick-up truck and we both died
    • This is followed up on a later album by a song called, appropriately enough, "Scalp". The narrator is asked by a shady friend to pick up a mysterious package at a warehouse and drop it off at another location. He gets into his car but has an internal struggle as to whether or not he should do such an obviously morally dubious thing. Deciding against his better judgement, he starts driving to the warehouse...
    I started talking to the image in the mirror
    I said, "You should go back in and explain
    Sonny will understand, everything will be fine
    Sean, calm down, get a grip, you're trippin"
    I shook myself and put the key in the ignition
    "Stop being a bitch now, man up"
    Rollin' down 26 with thoughts of handcuffs
  • Rapper and singer Dessa had a song called "Mineshaft" that was about a painful breakup. On a later album, she released a song called "Mineshaft 2", set sometime afterwards as the ex-boyfriend calls her in an attempt to get back together.
    • "Mineshaft"
    I've been here before, and I know where it goes
    It goes down...
    • "Mineshaft 2"
    You've already been here before
    You already know where it goes
    You chose this, you know its supposed to be over
  • Rapper Sage Francis has a series of songs detailing the aftermath of a painful breakup. Each song features the same lyrical structure, but the individual words changed to reflect the mod. The first, called "The Write", finds Sage sad and heartbroke. The second song, called "Rewrite", show Sage angry at the ex-girlfriend, calling her a bitch, with the mood of the track scornful and defiant. The final and third song, fittingly called "Threewrite", is much more peaceful, with Sage finally coming to terms with what happened and finally moving on.
  • After "Minnie the Moocher" became his Signature Song, Cab Calloway wrote a series of songs about Minnie and her boyfriend Smokey Joe.
  • a-ha's "The Sun Always Shines on TV" video is a sequel to the "Take on Me" video, and begins with Morten Harkett's character leaving the love interest and returning to animated comic form.
  • Funker Vogt's "Tragic Hero" had two sequels, "Fallen Hero" and "Arising Hero".
  • Future Perfect: "Solitary Star" is the follow-on to "Queen of the Dance Floor" from the same album (Dirty Little Secrets), as evident by the callbacks in the lyrics. On their second album, Escape, "Paradise" is about escapism through sex, bondage, drugs, etc., while the title track, which directly follows it, is about coming to grips with reality.
  • Ayla - "Ayla Part II" (there isn't a part 3, that's a Misattributed Song)
  • Erasure's "Always", to "Sometimes".
  • BT's "Godspeed" is a spiritual successor to "Flaming June", and "Suddenly" has a similar melody to "Love Comes Again", one of his collaborations with DJ Tiesto.
  • "Stormy Skies", by Paul van Dyk & Wayne Jackson, is this to "The Other Side", their previous collaboration, which was a tribute to the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami; "Stormy Skies" may be about Hurricane Katrina or some other disastrous storm.
  • They Might Be Giants did a series of songs based around a titular "Hotel Detective". The first, "(She Was a) Hotel Detective" being on their debut album. The second off an EP released shortly before their fifth album, called "She Was A Hotel Detective" (no parentheses). The lastest from their podcast album was called ("She Was a) Hotel Detective in the Future"!
  • Hank Williams, Jr. gave us "All My Rowdy Friends Have Settled Down", which was far more melancholy-sounding than "All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight".
  • Clint Black: "No Time to Kill" is basically a sequel to "Killin' Time".
  • "Boogie Bam Dance" by the Caramella Girls, formerly Caramell, is the sequel to "Caramelldansen".
  • Cascada: "Wouldn't It Be Good" to "Everytime We Touch", and "Sinner on the Dance Floor" to "Evacuate the Dance Floor".
  • Aerosmith wrote "Rats in the Cellar" to be the Rocks counterpart of "Toys in the Attic", from their previous album Toys in the Attic.
  • Coldplay have Life in Technicolor and then Life in Technicolor II on the following album. The sequel is an extended version with lyrics of the first, which is an instrumental.
  • mind.in.a.box's "I Love 64", to "8 Bits", both from the R.E.T.R.O album. In turn, those have a sequel on Revelations titled "Unknown", also using a synthetic female voice, "Whatever Mattered" has the follow-up "Second Reality", and "Control" appears to be a spiritual successor to their version of Chris Hülsbeck's "Shades".
  • DJ Shog's "Another World" has the spiritual sequel "Live 4 Music", as well as the official sequel "Another World Part II".
  • Kevin Matisyn did this between two separate bands. Evans Blue's 2007 album had the song "Kiss the Flag", a song about a fallen soldier. In 2010, Parabelle (Matisyn's new band after parting ways with Evans Blue) released the song "Kiss the Flag: The Widow"
  • The Iron Maiden song "Charlotte The Harlot" on their first album was followed by "22 Acacia Avenue", a Darker and Edgier take on the same character.
    • Charlotte shows up again in "From Here to Eternity", this time as a motorcycle enthusiast. Or just interested in a guy on a bike.
      • Don't Look To The Eyes Of A Stranger is seen as the sequel to Prowler. Whilst Prowler is from a pervert's point of view, Don't Look... is from his victim's.
  • Ministry have "TV Song", "TV II", "TV III", "WTV", and "Side Fx Include Mikey's Middle Finger (TV 4)" note . "TV II" is just a re-recording of "TV Song", but the rest are all separate songs that are connected by very fast, Hardcore Punk-like tempos, Spoken Word In Music in the form of samples from television, and frequent use of Stop and Go.
  • Christian singer Kenny Marks wrote a song called "The Party's Over", chronicling how Johnny and Jeannie hooked up at a party, she got pregnant, and he split. A sequel, called "Next Time You See Johnny" was written later telling about the girl, now a single mother, listening to her child praying for his daddy, and ends with Jeannie reprising the chorus in her own prayer, forgiving her baby-daddy.
  • Big Dipper followed up "Guitar Named Desire" with "Guitar Named Desire: The Animated Sequel" 25 years later. The original "Guitar Named Desire" was a mostly-instrumental Single Stanza Song, whereas "The Animated Sequel" uses a slight variation on the same music but adds more lyrics, giving it proper verses and choruses.
  • Yeah, Welcome 2 My Nightmare is an entire sequel album for Alice Cooper's solo debut album Welcome To My Nightmare, but really, the intro song "I Am Made of You" is the only track to really display that fact. Musically, that is. The piano line driving the song is the same line used in "Steven" from the original album, showing how Steven has been able to get over his previous nightmare and effectively linking the two albums. It doesn't help that the nightmares begin again...
  • "Valkyrie" by The Cruxshadows appears to be a spiritual sequel to their signature song "Winterborn"; both have similar song structures and lyrics pertaining to Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Lady Gaga's "Judas", to "Bad Romance".
  • Chuck Berry did sequels for "Johnny B. Goode" ("Bye Bye Johnny") and "Memphis" ("Little Marie").
  • The Bellamy Brothers made three rewrites/sequels their 1985 hit "Old Hippie", about a former hippie facing the mid-80s life and starting to clean himself up. First was "Old Hippie (The Sequel)" in 1995, where he's now married and has a family. A year later was "Old Hippie Christmas", an obviously holiday-themed version. Finally, in 2007, they did "Old Hippie III", where said hippie is converted to Christianity.
  • Mitch Benn's "Knut Saga", four topical songs on The Now Show about a polar bear in Berlin Zoo. The first, "The Baby Bear Must Die!" in 2007, was about the controversy following the bear cub's birth, with some saying he shouldn't have been raised by humans after being rejected by his mothernote . The second, "Knut Isn't Cute Any More" the following year, was about a report that interest in the bear was dropping as he reached adolescence. In 2008 he composed the Power Ballad "Goodbye Knut", based on reports that Knut would be moved to another zoo, and following the bear's death in 2011 he wrote the "Candle in the Wind" parody "Panda in Berlin" (yes, he aknowledges that in the song).
  • Austra's "What We Done", to "The Future". "She saw the future, and it was dark".
  • Nieminen & Litmanen had "Leo Jokela" on their debut album and "Leo Jokela Rides Again" on the second.
  • Galaxy Hunter's "When I Close My Eyes", to "Thousand Miles Away". Both are Love Nostalgia Songs, and the later song has a Title Drop Call Back to the first.
  • Most of mind.in.a.box's songs are direct (plot) sequels to previous songs, as all but one of their albums forms one cohesive plot. "Tape Evidence" is a prequel song, combining beats and snippets of lyrics from later songs in the album, but only when Black is dreaming or listening to a tape he found on his doorstep.
  • (Former) MOD artist Markus "Captain" Kaarlonen's "Beyond Music" appears to be one to "Space Debris".
  • Bjorn "Dr. Awesome" Lynne's "Bridge to the Universe, Part 2".
  • The Pretty Reckless follows up "Going Down" from their debut album with "Going To Hell", the title song of their second one. It features the same protagonist confessing to the same priest.
  • About four decades after Insterburg & Co.'s iconic song "Ich liebte ein Mädchen", in which the singer was supposedly involved with girls all over the world, Fettes Brot made what they call a "continuation" titled "Für immer immer". It is not a Cover Version as they only kept the concept and generic lines.
  • Doug Burr has "Chief of Police in Chicago" and "You've Been a Suspect All Your Life". Both are set in a near-future where genetic science is advanced enough to predict future behavior (or so the politicians claim). In the first song, the Police Chief tells a mother that her son tested positive for the gene indicating criminal behavior. In the second song, the mother gets sick of the constant police surveillance of her son, so she takes the boy and runs away to start a new life elsewhere.
  • Anathallo has four tracks on their album Floating World with the prefix "Hanasakajiji". Taken together, they're a slightly anachronic retelling of the Japanese myth "Old Man Cherry-Blossom".
  • The Moody Blues' 1988 song, "I Know You're Out There Somewhere" (from Sur La Mer), was a sequel to their 1986 hit song, "Your Wildest Dreams"; the music video for the aforementioned song continued where "Your Wildest Dreams" left off.
  • WoodenToaster's infamous MLP fan song "Rainbow Factory", which inspired a Dark Fic of the same name, has two sequels; "Awoken" by WoodenToaster himself with H8_Seed, and "Pegasus Device" by SlyphStorm, which references both of its predecessors at the end.
  • Evening Star's "One Day I Will Fly", a Lonely Piano Piece about Scootaloo's (currently) unattainable dream of flight, has a sequel titled "First Flight", where she finally accomplishes it.

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