Fridge / Game of Thrones

Fridge Brilliance

Series-Wide
  • One can find many parallels between Jon's fight against Karl Tanner and Ned Stark's fight against Arthur Dayne.
    • Both feature a member of the Stark family battling an enemy who fights with two blades (knives for Karl, swords for Dayne).
    • The enemy overcomes the Stark, but is stabbed from behind (Sissy stabs Karl and Howland Reed stabs Dayne).
    • The fight ends with the enemy being finished off with a Valyrian sword (Jon impales Karl through the head with Longclaw and Ned decapitates Dayne with his own sword, Dawn).
  • Tywin Lannister, when not in a council meeting or otherwise engaged in work, has been shown killing and skinning animals (a stag in Season 1, fish in a Season 3 deleted scene.) Later, after forging two swords out of the Stark great-sword Ice, he burns Ned Stark's wolf pelt scabbard in the flames and gloats in triumph. Some viewers have noted how the animal reflects the adversary of the time, but there's an even deeper layer to it. Tywin is a man with absolutely no respect for love, art, humor or music. He finds them to be useless wastes of time. So these scenes answer the question of what a man like that does for fun. Even his leisure time has a purpose (providing his meal for the evening.) Tywin does nothing simply for its own sake.
    • This quality is ultimately Tywin's biggest strength and weakness. It is why he differs from his daughter, Cersei, and grandson, Joffrey — and why he ultimately does a better job maintaining order than either. Tywin, while ruthless, is trustworthy in the sense that both his allies and enemies know what they're going to get from him. His detachment made him largely impervious to the same errors of emotion as Cersei, Joffrey, and many other rulers in the show. Ironically, though, his failure to see the intrinsic value in things and people unless they was being put to use for his ends made him a terrible father (i.e., he was incapable of loving his children just for being his children) and is at least a small part of what eventually got him killed by one of his own children.
  • The symbols of various families help define their hats as well as some of their interactions with each other.
    • The Starks are represented by direwolves. Wolves are social animals known for their loyalty, just as the Starks are a loving family with a tight bond, sisterhood rivalries not withstanding. Canines are also traditional enemies of felines, representing the Starks' feud with the leonine Lannisters.
    • The Lannisters are represented by lions. Lions are apex predators traditionally depicted as kings of the animal kingdom, representing the Lannisters' lofty standing. Lions are also symbols of pride, just as the Lannisters are extremely concerned with the prestige of their House over the rest. Lannisters are often the first to use animal analogies to indicate their superiority. For example, at one point Jaime sneers, "By what right does the wolf judge the lion?" Lions are also perceived to be a lot more noble and regal than they are in real life.
    • The Tullys are represented by a fish. Fish are generally seen as vulnerable prey for more aggressive predatory animals, but their strength usually lies in their large numbers, as most of them travel in massive schools for protection. Similarly, the Tullys take family very seriously, and pride themselves on staying loyal to their allies no matter what—because they know that their strength comes from their strong ties with the people who they hold dear.
    • House Baratheon is represented by a stag. In pagan mythology, stags are symbols of the hunt, as well as of sexual prowess, promiscuity and potency. The foremost member of the house, Robert, is an avid hunter and sexual athlete with dozens of children, to the detriment of the realm and himself. While it's probably not intentional, Christian mythology also holds that stags are enemies of serpents, which reflects the enmity between Robert and the Targaryens.
    • House Tyrell is represented by a rose. Flowers, particularly roses, are usually given to people to get in their good graces. The Tyrells are infamous Social Climbers in Westeros. Flowers are also frequently used as decorations, matching the Tyrells' extravagant nature. Additionally, roses are renowned for their thorns — to handle them carelessly due to their beauty is to risk surprising injury. Olenna Tyrell is often called "The Queen of Thorns."
    • House Greyjoy is represented by a kraken. On one hand, a fearsome sea creature is appropriate as a symbol of the Iron Islands, which is home to the most feared sailors in the Seven Kingdoms. But as Ramsay himself points out: squid and octopi are only formidable predators when in their element (the ocean); they're pathetically weak on land, as their soft bodies tend to collapse without the buoyancy of ocean water to hold them up. Theon and the other ironborn find this out the hard way when they try to conquer the North by land, and fail miserably.
  • From the opening titles, the coins rolling down the aqueduct of Braavos. Of course the model of the Proud Merchant Race city is coin-operated.
  • Wyrm is another word for a dragon, which makes Grey Worm's service to Dany an astonishingly appropriate coincidence, especially since he was given a new insulting name each day before his liberation.
  • Obsidian is also called dragonglass. Obsidian is volcanic glass made from great heat, and dragons are considered the embodiment of fire. This also explains why when an obsidian weapon stabs a White Walker, the embodiment of cold, both the obsidian and the White Walker melt away. Given how hot we see dragonfire is (especially in "Spoils of War"), it seems likely that dragonfire can create dragonglass, in the same way volcanic lava creates obsidian.
  • A meta-example; the series has come to redefine the Anyone Can Die trope, but this runs the risk of losing viewers who might be watching solely for one particular character. Now, however, it seems the creators have found a way to make viewers stick around; in the wake of Jon Snow's death and resurrection, they're basically saying, "Yeah, we bumped off your favorite for the sake of great drama, but stick around! You never know!"
  • For those familiar with the books, Ellaria Sand is the bastard daughter of Lord Uller and there's a common Dornish saying that "Half of the Ullers are half-mad, and the other half are worse". Book!Ellaria is the complete opposite of that saying as she is not vengeful or bloodthirsty. However, TV!Ellaria perfectly fits the saying given for her actions in Seasons 5 and 6 and she could either fall on the mad half or the worse half or maybe both.
  • In the Season 1 finale, there's a memorable scene where we learn that Grand Maester Pycelle is actually much more spry and alert than he appears, but pretends to be frail and absent-minded so that his rivals will underestimate him. Near the end of Season 5, we learn the opposite about Melisandre: she's actually a frail and elderly old woman, but uses a magical charm to make herself appear young and beautiful so that she can use seduction to manipulate people. Why is this significant? Because Pycelle and Melisandre are also opposites in a different way: as a Maester, Pycelle sees himself as a guardian of science and scholarship, and he abhors magic and superstition; as a Red Priestess, Melisandre sees herself as an ambassador of R'hllor, and she uses magic to perform feats that can't be understood through science.
  • In Season 3, when Dany first meets Missandei, and the latter notes in Valyrian "Valar Morghulis" which Dany translates as "All Men Must Die, but we are not men", Missandei pauses and gives a significant look, and it's a set up to the scene where Dany invokes Bilingual Backfire and burns the Astapori slavers and liberates the Unsullied. But another meaning becomes apparent when in Season 7, Missandei brings up the "Blind Idiot" Translation of the gender-neutral phrases of Valyrian translated into inexact male and female pronouns when Melisandre mentions the Prince who was Promised prophecy. As a professional translator who pays attention to grammatical and linguistic exactness, Missandei didn't immediately latch on to Dany's significant double-meaning of "All Men Must Die" because in Valyrian, "Valar Morghulis" could mean "All Men/All Women Must Die" whereas Dany as a native fluent speaker of both Common Tongue and Valyrian, never made that connection, and thought that Valar Morghulis did not necessarily apply to women.
  • Retroactively, the dialogue exchange in Season 1, "The Kingsroad" becomes this in light of the revelations of the Season 7 finale:
    Robert Baratheon: Oh, it's unspeakable to you? What her father did to your family, that was unspeakable! What Rhaegar Targaryen did to your sister, the woman I loved! I'll kill every Targaryen I get my hands on!
    Ned Stark: But you can't get your hands on this one, can you?
    • This is classic One Dialogue, Two Conversations. On the surface Ned and Robert are talking about Daenerys, but secretly, Robert stating that Rhaegar did to Lyanna was unspeakable, was being actually accurate, and Ned replying "you can't get your hands on this one" is not referring to Daenerys, or Daenerys alone, but to Jon Snow, and he's more or less smugly smiling to his best friend, about how well he kept the secret of Aegon "Jon Snow" Targaryen right under his nose.

Season 1
  • Jaqen H'ghar's first appearance is hidden in a cloak, with his face not visible. This was done because the actor wasn't cast yet, but it's also a reference to his true identity as a Faceless Man.
  • In "You Win Or You Die", Cersei orders Ned to kneel before her near the end of the episode. Of course, Ned won't because his honor prevents it, but furthermore, his leg wound means he physically can't, and Cersei probably realizes this.
  • The show's use of 'sexposition', which is exposition via sex scenes. Seeing as how everyone seems to talk their heads off during sex, is it any surprise that Littlefinger, who runs the brothels in King's Landing, is also a bit of a Knowledge Broker?
  • The first scene with Jaime and Cersei in episode 1. Viewers will infer that the Lannisters were behind Jon Arryn's murder. If you listen to their conversation, it's obvious they weren't the perpetrators — they were worried because they had no idea how much Jon Arryn knew, and what his actions were before his death! Before they had the chance to interrogate (and murder) Arryn, someone else had taken him out.
  • Robert Baratheon mentions that he favored wielding a war hammer in battle. It is perhaps no coincidence that his bastard son Gendry is first seen wielding the hammer of a blacksmith. In "What Is Dead, May Never Die", Gendry is seen wielding a hammer when fighting the Lannisters.
  • In episode 6 "A Golden Crown", Ser Jorah Mormont stops Viserys from taking the eggs, saying, "And yet here I stand." He's not just being badass — he's paraphrasing his House words ("Here We Stand").
  • The scene where the Stark household discovers a direwolf and a stag's Mutual Kill foreshadows a number of future events:
    • Stags and Direwolves are the sigils of Houses Baratheon and Stark. Sure enough, Ned and Robert's actions lead to their deaths within the season.
    • When Ned orders the direwolf pups to be killed, the Stark children protest, while Theon pulls out his knife right away. Theon will ultimately betray the Starks.
    • Jon uses his illegitimacy to save the litter of pups and so each of his half brothers and sisters can have one but he later finds an albino pup who is separated from the others and adopts him as his own, calling him "Ghost". Like his direwolf Ghost, Jon is both part of his Stark family and is also separated to a degree from the other Stark kids — not only because he is an illegitimate child, but because he's actually their cousin (as Jon is the son of Ned's sister Lyanna, making him Ned's nephew) — though they all still have Stark blood.
  • Ned is surprised to find a direwolf south of the Wall. The White Walkers are making the land beyond the Wall uninhabitable even for direwolves and have pushed this one south. Mance Rayder reveals a similar intention for the Wildlings in Season 3.
  • When Dany asks Mirri Maz Duur if anything can be done to save Drogo, Mirri very briefly and visibly glances at Dany's stomach. Probably not a detail you'd notice if you didn't know what was coming.
  • Drogo's wound becomes infected in spite of Mirri Maz Duur's treatment, but several episodes later she reveals that she hates the Dothraki and wants revenge on them. Certainly, she botched the treatment on purpose in order to facilitate her ultimate betrayal.
  • Sansa says, "I'll be a good wife to [Joffrey], you'll see. I'll be a queen just like you, I promise! I won't hatch anything!" This stands in contrast to a different queen, who does hatch something.
  • Regarding Sansa and her direwolf Lady, Robert tells Ned, "Direwolves are no pets. Get her a dog and she'll be happier for it." Sandor Clegane, often referred to as "The Hound" has done more to protect Sansa than Lady ever did.
  • There are parallels between the personalities and fates of the direwolves and their Stark masters.
    • Grey Wind joins his master Robb in battle and sometimes even strikes the first blow, just as Robb leads from the front, and both are murdered with crossbow bolts during the Red Wedding.
    • Lady is the most docile of the direwolves, but is ordered to die on command of the Queen, just as Sansa is at the mercy of the Queen. Both Sansa and Lady are sentenced to death on accusation of harming Joffrey.
    • Nymeria is forced to go on the run and fend for herself, just as Arya is.
    • Summer is pretty even-tempered and is only seen attacking out of defensive instinct. Bran is even-tempered and outspoken in his desire to protect his subjects. Summer sacrifices himself to protect Bran, while Bran will most likely have to sacrifice his future as a Stark in order to take the Three Eyed Raven's place.
    • Shaggydog is particularly aggressive. Rickon is irritable and confused while most of his family is away. Both are killed rather brutally and suddenly.
    • Ghost is different from the rest of his siblings and is discovered having separated himself from the rest of the litter, just as Jon Snow is the bastard son of Ned Stark and leaves Winterfell to join the Night's Watch. Ghost and Jon are both part of their families while also being a bit apart from their siblings too. Ghost is also an albino, while the other direwolves are mostly grey. Traditionally, noble-born bastard children can have the sigil of their house (if knighted), but with colors reversed, in this case a white direwolf on grey as opposed to the Stark's grey direwolf on white. Ghost's white fur also symbolises the fact that Jon's actual father is from House Targaryen, whose members are known for having hair so blonde it's almost white.
  • Jorah's armor looks oddly familiar, doesn't it? It's Northerner armor, because Jorah was a knight of the North until he was exiled, and he would naturally bring along the armor he possessed before his exile.
  • Robb's men's assessment of Frey's character foreshadow his actions word-for-word in the Red Wedding in Season 3.
    Greatjon: "He'll sell you to the Lannisters as he likes!"
    Theon: "Or slit your throat."
    and
    Catelyn: "I have known Lord Walder since I was a girl. He would never harm me."
    Greatjon: "Unless there was a profit in it."
  • Dany's survival of the funeral pyre in the Season 1 finale is foreshadowed several times. In her first scene, she steps into a scalding bath without reaction. Later, she holds burning-hot dragon eggs without being burned. After her brother's death, in which he is killed by burning molten gold, she flat-out asserts, "Fire cannot kill a dragon."
  • One can surmise dragon's eggs are hatched by the mother breathing fire on them, as they hatch after Dany places them on the funeral pyre.
  • In episode 1, Robert wants Ned to run his kingdom, "While I eat, drink, and whore my way into an early grave." Now, let's look at Robert's death: it was connected to all three (eating — he was hunting a boar, drinking — he was drunk, whoring — his bastard children make Ned realize the truth about Cersei's children, forcing her to plan his death).
  • There's one scene where Viserys is in the bathtub with Doreah. She seductively pours hot wax on his chest and makes him wince in pain. This foreshadows his death by burning, in contrast to the apparently heatproof Daenerys.
  • Ser Barristan's last parting remark to Joffrey that he melt Barristan's sword down and add it to the Iron Throne isn't just bravado. The Iron Throne was made by Aegon the Conqueror out of the swords of his enemies.
  • King Robert's introduction to the Stark children ironically foreshadows their fates:
    • He passes over Rickon and just ruffles his hair. Rickon later is Put on a Bus and virtually disappears from the series until Season 6.
    • He remarks how pretty Sansa is, which becomes more of a curse for her when she is at the mercy of his son and later at the hands of Ramsay Bolton.
    • He asks Arya her name, which she later is forced to discard when she becomes "No One," a disciple of the Many-Faced God.
    • He tells Bran to show off his muscles and says he'll be a soldier. Only a day later Bran is thrown from the tower and becomes a cripple.
  • The three lords who pledge loyalty to Robb in the King in the North scene are Theon Greyjoy, Rickard Karstark, and Greatjon Umber. Theon betrays Robb in Season 2 and the Karstarks and Umbers betray the Starks as well.
  • In the scene between Jon and Maester Aemon, Aemon states that love can make men do dishonorable things. Jon insists that Ned would always do what is right and never give up his honor, but through the course of the series, we see Ned sacrifice his honor out of love twice: once in declaring Joffrey the true king to save his daughters Sansa and Arya, and once in lying about his nephew Jon's parentage to keep Jon safe and keep a promise to his sister Lyanna.
  • Everybody remembers the moment in "The Kingsroad" when Ned tells Jon "You may not have my name, but you have my blood", since it later turned out to be foreshadowing for The Reveal that Jon is actually Ned's nephew. But it's also very much in-character for Ned to say this: he's a "man of honor" who clearly doesn't like lying, and if you rewatch Season 1, you'll notice that this is the only scene when Ned explicitly speaks about his familial connection with Jon. Tellingly, instead of outright saying that Jon is his son, he just tells him that he has his blood—because that's actually true.

Season 2
  • The parallels between Sansa and Arya's situations in "A Garden of Bones". Both endure torture at the hands of the Lannisters, and both are rescued by the Lords of the Lannisters. Tyrion compliments Sansa on her composure after being stripped and beaten and Tywin compliments Arya on her smarts for traveling as a boy. The ironic part is that Tywin is completely unaware of who Arya really is.
  • The melody playing as The Purge of Robert's bastard children goes on in the first episode of the second season is "The King's Coming". Indeed, King's Landing, here comes your new king.
  • If you look closely at the model of Harrenhal in the opening credit sequence, it has the remnants of moving parts, showing that it's not just the model of a broken castle but a broken model of a broken castle.
  • The deliberate parallel between Jon Snow and Theon Grejoy in "The Old Gods and the New" when they are holding prisoners at swordpoint and ready to kill them. Theon, driven by the need to prove himself to his harsh and brutal men, chooses to succumb to the pressure to do something he clearly doesn't want to and delivers a botched execution on Rodrik. Jon, meanwhile, is alone with his prisoner, and no one would know if he took Ygritte's head or spared her. And in the end, Jon spares her. This does a great job showing the difference between two of the people who felt the most like outsiders of the Stark household.
  • When Daxos is vouching for Dany and her people, the one among the Thirteen who nods first and most enthusiastically? Pyat Pree. Considering their arrangement, the foreshadowing is quite subtle but very deliberate.
  • No wonder Tyrion begins his conversation about Myrcella with Pycelle by asking him for a laxative. He's full of shit.
  • Bronn's cautionary words about the distribution of wildfire are validated. During the battle of Blackwater, we see some workers lose hold of the mass of rocks they were pulling towards a catapult. Now, imagine if this was wildfire.
  • In his first meeting with Dany, Pyat Pree dismisses Xaro's possessions as "baubles and trinkets," even though Xaro is known as the richest man in Qarth. It later turns out that not only is Pyat working with Xaro, but that Xaro's treasure vault is empty. Pyat knows that Xaro's riches amount to no more than the furniture and bric-a-brac around his home.
  • In "The Night Lands", Melisandre whispers to Matthos, Davos' son, that death by fire is the purest death. What happens to Matthos in Blackwater? Death by wildfire.
  • The beautiful symmetry between the Season 1 and Season 2 finales. Both seasons end with the return of something supernatural that hasn't been seen in centuries, but where Season 1 uses fire to bring about the return of something magical and wondrous, Season 2 uses ice to signal the return of something magical and horrifying. Ice and fire are recurring themes in the series. Oh, and both seasons end with a Dark Reprise of the main theme.
  • Although it's never remarked upon in the show, Robb's marriage ceremony is a combination of his faith in the old gods and his wife's faith in the Seven. They're married by a septon in front of an oak tree (a weirwood being unavailable in the South).
  • Some of Drogo's lines in the House of the Undying are similar to lines from Conan the Barbarian, another character portrayed by Jason Mamoa:
    Drogo: Or maybe this is a dream. Your dream or my dream, I do not know. These are questions for wise men with skinny arms. You are the moon of my life, that is all I know and all I need to know. And if this is a dream, then I will kill the man who tries to wake me.
    Conan: Let teachers and priests and philosophers brood over questions of reality and illusion. I know this: if life is an illusion, then I am no less an illusion, and being thus, the illusion is real to me. I live, I burn with life, I love, I slay, and I am content.
  • In the premiere episode, there's a scene where Robb and Catelyn argue about trading Jaime for Sansa and Arya, during the course of which Robb yells at his mother — he immediately looks guilty and ashamed. The next scene is of Joffrey and Cersei arguing about Arya, during the course of which Cersei slaps her son — he immediately threatens her with death. It's a great contrast between the relationships among the Starks and the Lannisters.
  • Dagmer's kraken sygil is torn apart. Of course he'd be the one to betray Theon.
  • "What Is Dead May Never Die" is a Double-Meaning Title. It's the motto of the Drowned God of the Ironborn and spoken by Theon during his baptism. It's also a reference to Arya's Deceased Fall-Guy Gambit in the the final scene, convincing the Lannister men that they can't kill Gendry because he's already dead.
  • "The Old Gods and the New": Robb compromises the North's campaign and his duty as king for a woman (Talisa); Jon compromises the Night Watch's mission for a woman (Ygritte); Theon compromises his hold over Winterfell for a woman (Osha). You can even make a case that Balon is right, and Theon is ruining everything because he can't keep it in his pants but at the same time is too chivalrous to just rape and kill like an Ironborn would. Instead, he acts like every other son raised by a certain Ned Stark, who nearly ruined his marriage when he came back with his bastard son to raise at home.
  • In "Valar Morgulis", no less than four main characters are offered a "temptation" to leave the struggle they are immersed in and escape it all into a far easier life: Dany tempted to stay in the illusory world with Drogo and their son, Theon tempted to join the Night's Watch, Arya tempted to stop looking for her family and go to Braavos under Jaqen's protection, and Tyrion tempted to go to Essos and live a life of pleasure with Shae. All of them reject their temptation, because it would involve denying and losing their very identity.
  • When Salladhor Saan says "You Westerosi are funny people. Man chops your fingers off, you fall in love with him," he's specifically talking about Davos and Stannis, but this is also a callback to Greatjon and Robb.
  • In the first episode of Season 2, Osha and Bran talk about the red comet and what everybody thinks it may mean: Robb winning a big battle, the Lannisters ruling Westeros, blood flowing en masse and dragons returning. By Season 3, all of these things have happened. Robb has won a lot of big battles, the Lannisters have retained control of the Seven Kingdoms with Joffrey as King, copious amounts of blood has been spilled, and dragons have returned.
  • Theon tells Maester Luwin he will not abandon Winterfell as he refuses to be mocked for a coward or a eunuch. Guess what happens to him in Season 3?
  • Jaqen H'Ghar tells Arya that by saving Rorge, Biter, and him from the cage, she "stole three deaths from the Red God." But as we later learn, Jaqen is a follower of the God of Many Faces, a conglomeration of all religions focused around death. So why does he use the title most commonly used to refer to Melisandre's Lord of Light? Because Jaqen, Rorge, and Biter would have burned to death in the cage if Arya hadn't rescued them, and the Lord of Light is most commonly associated with fire. Indeed, worshipers of the Red God have a nasty habit of burning people alive as human sacrifices, because they believe fire is the purest form of death. So Jaqen associates death by burning as specifically relating to the R'hllor aspect of the God of Many Faces. If she had rescued them from drowning, he might have said she "stole three deaths from the Drowned God."
  • Tyrion's Batman Gambit of marrying Myrcella to discover who the snitch is in the small council actually contains tons of foreshadowing of future events in the series as well as parallelism with the characters he mentioned:
    • He tells Pycelle that he'll marry Myrcella to the heir of Dorne, which is what ends up happening as Pycelle is revealed to be the snitch. He also scolded the Grand Maester for letting Jon Arryn die of poison. Just like Pycelle betrayed Tyrion, Myrcella was ultimately betrayed by Ellaria Sand, and she was killed by the latter via poisoning.
    • He tells Varys that he'll marry Myrcella to Theon, with the "intention" of destroying the Stark army from within. Theon betrays the Starks at the end of the same episode. And Theon ultimately becomes a eunuch just like Varys.
    • He tells Littlefinger that he'll marry Myrcella to Robin Arryn, with Littlefinger looking uncomfortable as he knows that Tyrion wants him to break the news to Robin's mother, Lysa. It's later revealed that Littlefinger has an affair with Lysa for his own personal gain.

Season 3
  • Way back in the very first episode, Jaime asked Ned Stark about him not competing in tournaments, to which Ned responded, "I don't fight in tournaments, because when I fight a man for real, I don't want him to see what I can do." Later in Season 3, Jaime and Brienne are caught by Roose Bolton's men because a farmer had seen him fight in a tournament, recognized him and told them. Jaime's vanity has finally caught up to him!
  • Daenerys suddenly reveals herself to be fluent in Valyrian in "And Now His Watch Has Ended." This was hinted at in previous episodes when she teaches her dragons a Valyrian command word and translates the phrase "valar morghulis." She also has an unheard conversation with a dying slave in "The Walk Of Punishment". During her conversations with the slavemaster, her expression also occasionally betrays her understanding.
  • Why would Ros risk her life to aid Sansa and generally be a pain the ass to Littlefinger's plans? She makes it clear in the first episode of this season, when she mentions to Shae that she remembers the bells ringing to announce Sansa's birth. Simply put, Ned Stark was her lord for years, and his stern justice probably kept her and her fellow prostitutes safer than they would have otherwise been. Her finding a place in King's Landing may have even owed something to him being Hand (it's fairly easy to imagine Northern girls coming into fashion among sycophants when a Stark is Hand).
  • In "Valar Dohaeris", while Tyrion is talking to Cersei, Ser Meryn Trant and another guard are guarding the door. Bronn comes along and tries to enter the room when he is blocked by Ser Meryn Trant who says 'You put your hand on that door and you lose the hand.' This may be a double entendre from Meryn Trant, who is also threatening the life of Tyrion Lannister with this line.
  • Daenerys insists on making Missandei a part of her deal with the Astapori slavers. The fact that Danaerys understands Valyrian means that she doesn't need Missandei as a translator, but it also means that she was aware of Missandei's Tactful Translation and was either suitably impressed or moved to pity, or both.
  • There are several hints that the identity of the cleaning boy who "rescues" Theon is Ramsay Snow, Roose Bolton's bastard son:
    • He quotes the Stark words, "Winter Is Coming," hinting that he's not from the Iron Islands as he claims.
    • He refers to Theon several times as "my lord," when it was established in Season 2 that commoners always say "m'lord" rather than "my lord."
    • The soldier calls him "bastard" just before being killed.
    • He tells Theon "We're not in the Iron Islands." This is similar to a line delivered by Roose Bolton to Robb: "We're not in the North."
    • This is the second time Theon's been kept awake by someone blowing a horn at him, and on top of that, the device Theon is bound to can come across as awfully familiar to those who have seen the banner of House Bolton.
  • Right after Burn Gorman's character kills Craster, Mormont is heard screaming, "You will be cursed by every law...!" This is a reference to Sacred Hospitality, which is a big deal in ancient cultures and in Westeros. It's also a big hint about exactly why Robb, his family and his army were massacred in mere minutes: they'd eaten bread and salt from Walder Frey, which was supposed to guarantee their safety under his roof, and had entered his castle unarmed and unprepared.
  • Both Melisandre and Thoros of Myr are red priests. However, while she is fanatical, uncompromising and has Stannis' victory as her main goal, he is a laid-back drunkard that cares mostly about protecting the smallfolk and has recovered his faith only recently. Reflecting their attitudes, Melisandre dresses in bright, uniform red robes, while Thoros wears faded pinkish or maroon clothes.
  • The parallels between Ned and Robb's deaths. Ned's fall was caused by his unyielding devotion to honor, but his last act before his death was dishonoring himself by lying about being a traitor. Robb's fall was caused by him following his heart over his head, and his last moments were watching the woman he loved die in front of him. Both father and son sacrificed everything for an ideal (Ned honor, Robb love), but had it taken away from them before they died.
  • The box that Ramsay sends Balon does not just have the Greyjoy ensign carved on — it is actually made out of Theon's Ironborn armor, as revealed by its distinctive hinges. This way, Ramsay is offering proof that he has Theon and that what is inside the box really belonged to him.
  • In the episode "Second Sons", Mero tells Daenerys "I swear I fucked you once in a pleasure house in Lys." Jorah tells him to mind his tongue with particular anger. While the comment is already an insult, it would also strike close to home for Jorah, whose second wife left him to become a concubine in Lys and resembles Daenerys. Mero might even be talking about the same woman.
  • The change of Robb's wife's character from Jeyne Westerling (a lesser lordly house under the Lannisters) to Talisa Maegyr (a Volantene noble daughter turned itinerant field nurse) adds another layer to why the Northern lords would have been upset at Robb marrying her. Not only is Robb's wife not from the North, she's not even from Westeros. The Northmen are known to be proud of their heritage — often to a fault — so for most of the Northmen it probably had as much or more to do with Talisa being Essosi than it did about the tactical implications of upsetting Lord Walder. Especially given that no one could have forseen his revenge plot coming — or Roose Bolton betraying them in a power grab, for that matter. Guys like the Blackfish or the Greatjon certainly wouldn't have stood for it.
  • In the finale, while talking to Sansa, Tyrion casually says "anyone named Desmond Crakehall has to be a pervert." This is a Mythology Gag, as in the books, the Crakehalls (albeit mostly the women) are notorious for their promiscuity.

Season 4
  • In "Two Swords," Gray Worm and Daario are competing to see who gets to ride with Daenerys. Simple enough, but it's odd that Gray Worm cares as much as Daario, who is utterly infatuated with Dany. Flash forward a few episodes and you realize Gray Worm has feelings for Missandrei, who is always by Dany's side. He wasn't competing to ride with Dany, but Missy.
  • Whenever Pycelle is speaking when Tywin is around, look at Tywin and you'll see him trying his best to hide an open sneer and often looking about. The reason is that in a deleted scene from Season 3, Tywin makes it clear he knows full well that Pycelle is faking being a doddering old man, which Pycelle confirms (this was also hinted at earlier, where he puts on the act with Ros, but then stands up quite nimbly after she leaves). Tywin openly asked "am I the only one who sees through this performance?" With that knowledge, you can enjoy these scenes more as Tywin is fighting not to openly gape at how everyone else buys Pycelle's act.
  • When Walda Bolton arrives at the Dreadfort in "The Lion and the Rose", her dress is surprisingly drab for a lady. However, in the next scene Roose comments that he had to be smuggled into his own land, explaining their nondescript attire.
  • The Lannisters' use of "The Rains of Castamere" as a Badass Boast becomes ironic in this season. The song is from the Reyne's point of view, lamenting the pride that precipitated their fall. However, the Lannisters themselves are the most prideful of houses, which causes them serious setbacks in this season as their behavior starts to catch up with them. This culminates in "The Children," where the song plays after Tywin is killed by his own son.
  • Foreshadowing for the events of the Purple Wedding:
    • As the septon says his words at Joffrey and Margery's wedding ceremony, the camera lingers on various main characters. When the septon says, "Cursed be he who would seek to tear them asunder", the camera pans in a way that subtly highlights Joffrey's murderer — Olenna Tyrell. This even plays further come Season 6, when the Green Trial, once again involving the Lannisters and Tyrells, see Cersei virtually wipe out her House. One wonders if, despite us rooting for her, Olenna was cursed by her actions to be the last of the family she tried to protect all her life.
    • Olenna Tyrell fusses over Sansa, adjusting her hair and her necklace. When done, a stone is missing from the right side, but Olenna hides its new asymmetry by draping Sansa's braid asymmetrically as well.
    • Olenna's comment about the Red Wedding, "Killing a man at a wedding... horrid! What sort of monster would do such a thing?"
  • When Olenna admits her actions to Margaery, she adjusts Margaery's necklace, just like she did Sansa's.
  • The revelation in "Oathkeeper" of the secret alliance between the Tyrells and Littlefinger gives their interactions in Season 3 a lot of edge. Olenna tells Cersei in "And Now His Watch Has Ended" that, "We mothers do what we can to keep our sons from the grave, but they do seem to yearn for it." Likewise Varys warning Olenna about Littlefinger probably set her wheels turning as to who will be the right man to pull off a regicide. And Olenna's meeting with Tywin where at first it seems like the old Lion had the upper hand, seeing it again its hard to see it as anything other than Lady Olenna laughing herself silly at Tywin's presumption.
  • In "Kissed by Fire", Lady Olenna was quick to foot half the bill for the Royal Wedding. This hints at her wanting the wedding to proceed at any cost to pull off the regicide. Also, since she's in cahoots with Littlefinger, she knows how desperate for money the Lannisters are (as former Master of Coin and the one responsible for borrowing large sums of money from the Iron Bank, Littlefinger knows the crown's finances very well).
  • With the revelation that the Lannisters are basically broke, Oberyn's taunt to Tywin that Prince Doran has the "rich man's disease" (gout) and remarks it's a wonder that Tywin doesn't have it as well is much more cutting in hindsight.
  • Sansa's new dress after her conversation with Littlefinger about why she lied for him at the inquest has a plunging neckline, fits to the curves of the Lady Stark and obviously is made to keep a firmer hold on Lord Baelish's attention. Yet with the dyed hair to hide her identity and black feathers exhibiting a likeness to Littlefinger's sigil the mockingbird, Sansa is also fully delving into her identity as his niece Alayne Stone. You could even say she's killing two birds with one stone. For bonus points, her new bird theme also references Sandor Clegane's nickname for her-"Little Bird."
  • When Oberyn and Tyrion discuss how Cersei makes her lies sound sincere, Tyrion admits "Making honest feelings do dishonest work is one of her many gifts." Later on, this is exactly what Sansa does when she relates her honest feelings of hatred at the Lannisters for humiliating her and her happiness at being liberated from King's Landing to do the dishonest work of enabling Westeros' most duplicitous man.
  • Sansa's rather outlandish new outfit looks like something a Disney villain would wear, but it's exactly the type of thing a teenager would create to feel sultry and wicked.
  • The events in Moat Cailin are pretty much a mirror image of what happened in Winterfell two seasons earlier. A troop of Ironborn trapped in a besieged castle. A commander who refuses surrender, rather seeking to die fighting. The commander betrayed by his subordinates. The Ironborn taking the offer of surrender and instead being skinned alive on Ramsey Snow's order. Must have been like a deja vu for poor Theon/Reek.
  • In "The Mountain and the Viper", Oberyn refuses to wear a helmet and claims that a man is useless when flat on his back. Both assumptions prove crucial to his defeat when his head is crushed by the prone Gregor.
  • In "The Children", Tyrion knows about the secret passage to the Hand's chambers because Varys gave him a map of all the secret passages of King's Landing in preparation for the Battle of Blackwater, way back in Season 2. Talk about a subtle Chekhov's Gun.
  • Also from "The Watchers on the Wall" there's a callback to Bronn's advice about using fire during a siege. The Night's Watch have fire as one of their weapons-a barrel gets stuck and explodes, killing a few men.
  • In the episode "The Mountain and the Viper", Tyrion and Jaime discuss the various terms for different types of murder (regicide, infanticide, etc.) Tyrion wonders if there's a type of murder that hasn't been named, and Jaime immediately replies "cousin killing". His immediate response makes complete sense when you realize that, in the second season, he murdered his distant cousin in order to escape from Robb Stark. What at first seems to be a cold-blooded killing that is never remarked upon again turns out to be something that Jaime still holds onto and thinks about.

Season 5
  • Tyrene's Ms. Fanservice bit with Bronn makes more sense in context when you realize that accelerating Bronn's heartrate also helped the poison spread.
  • Back in Season 2, Jorah has a conversation with Quaithe of Asshai while she tattoos a man's back with magical protective symbols because he's planning to sail near Valyria. Later on Jorah sails through Valyria without any such protection and gets infected with greyscale.
  • In "The Dance of Dragons," we see that the great fighting pit's outer walls have massive harpy statues with smashed faces. As we saw earlier, all symbols of the slavers have been knocked down, but apparently the fighting pit's statues are load-bearing and could not be completely removed, requiring a compromise.
  • In "The Dance of Dragons," Hizdahr states that Meereen has been around before Daenerys and will remain long after they are all dead. Tyrion responds by saying that his father would have liked Hizdahr. We've heard Tywin say very similar things about family, such as: "All of us dead, all of us rotting underground. It's the family name that lives on."
  • After taking up worship of R'hllor, Stannis added a burning heart around the stag of House Baratheon on his arms. So far, he has invoked R'hllor to kill two members of House Baratheon: his brother and his daughter, the latter by literally burning her alive while she clutches a stag.
  • When the small council starts to criticize the High Septon for attending Petyr Baelish's brothel, Grand Maester Pycelle angrily snaps that a man's private business should stay private. We've seen Pycelle frequenting Baelish's prostitutes in previous seasons.
  • When Jorah storms the fighting pit in "The Gift," he takes down each pit fighter non-lethally, even though he's armed with a sword. This is because just beforehand, he watched Daenerys react with disgust toward the bloodshed and move to leave. Rushing out into the fray and using non-lethal force ensured that she would not leave before he could speak to her.
  • When Azor Ahai was chosen to lead in the war against darkness he forged a hero's sword, but tempering it in water or lion's blood only made it shatter. When he stabbed his wife in the heart with the sword, her soul was bonded to the blade, creating a sword of living flame called Lightbringer that he used to save the realm. Stannis, who Melisandre has prophesied as Azor Ahai reborn, makes several failed attempts at fulfilling his supposed destiny. When all other options are exhausted he sacrifices his daughter, Shireen, to R'hllor in exchange for victory against the Boltons. Like Azor Ahai, Stannis had to make the ultimate sacrifice for the greater good of his cause.
  • The episode "Sons of the Harpy" reveals that Rhaegar is good at playing the harp. At the same time, the episode has the most blatant Foreshadowings of the identity of Rhaergar's son.
  • In "Hardhome," When Olly talks to Sam about Jon's plan, Sam tells him that sometimes people have to make hard choices that seem wrong at the time but are better in the long run. Olly processes the words, but does not lighten up. In a later episode, Olly will help betray Jon, an action that seems wrong in the moment, but he feels is better in the long run. In the same conversation, Sam tells Olly not to worry about Jon because "he always comes back!" In a later episode, Jon comes back from the dead.

Season 6
  • In Episode 4, Ramsay is skinning an apple when Osha arrives. He sets the skin aside and tries to intimidate her with the fact that he skins his enemies, but she says that she's "seen worse" because he doesn't eat the remains. After killing her, he starts skinning a new apple... and eats the skin.
  • Littlefinger's gift of a falcon to Robin Arryn is doubly meaningful. Falcons are the symbol of House Arryn, and Robin has always displayed an unhealthy interest in seeing things "fly." Also the falcon is caged, just as Littlefinger has the Vale's Lord completely under his control.
  • In Episode 4, "Book of the Stranger," Jon has discarded his original black Night's Watch clothing for something a little familiar. He is now wearing the exact same armor as Ned did in the flashbacks in "Oathbreaker," and as Robb wore during Season 3.
  • Initially, Theon was a proud idiot with family issues, with potential for greatness but always fell short. Then he was castrated, and utterly broken mentally and physically, becoming the weak "Reek". How did he reclaim his Theon self? By killing Myranda (and saving Sansa in the process) to atone for his sins. He reclaimed his honor by paying the Iron Price. The soundtrack even realizes this: As Theon kills Myranda and reclaims his identity, the track being played is "Pay the Iron Price". Even better is that Theon was imperfect, then they broke him, then he came back to the Iron Islands, and Theon is now a much better person than he was before. What is the Ironborn motto? "What is dead may never die, but rises again, harder and stronger". Theon was thought dead, being psychologically murdered, but he rose again. Harder and stronger.
  • Jaime confesses to the High Sparrow that he killed his king and his own cousin. Season 4 hinted that Jaime is still affected by murdering his cousin Alton, and this line confirms it. Knowing how much Jaime's regicide has damaged him, bringing it up in the same breath as his cousin-slaying speaks volumes of how he must feel guilty about it.
  • There's a certain irony that Theon, who betrayed the Starks and seized Winterfell, and Rickon, one of those Starks who had to leave Winterfell as a result, wind up in the exact same situation: mistaken for dead, betrayed by their allies and handed over to Ramsay.
  • In retrospect, Tommen's first answer to his grandfather Tywin's question of "What makes a good king?" "Holiness?" was foreshadowing.
  • Most of Tyrion's advice/decisions regarding the ruling of Mereen come from his observations of ruling King's Landing. His main concern is making sure Mereen's people kept faith in Daenerys and kept safe and well-fed, which were drawn from his experience of ruling King's Landing when the people clearly hated him and the Crown while they were besieged and starving. He also advised Dany to set Daario aside before leaving for Westeros, clearing stemming from his own affair with Shae.
  • Tyrion's Rank Up to the Hand of Queen Danaerys in the Season 6 finale is a direct inversion of his demotion from Hand of King Joffrey at the end of Season 2. Tyrion was granted emergency powers as ruler of Mereen after Danaerys's disappearance, much like he was temporarily granted the position of Hand of the King from Tywin. He was given a city on the brink of disaster and rebellion and managed to stabilize it long enough for an army to swoop in to rescue it, Tywin with the Tyrells and Dany with the Dorthraki and her dragons. Dany appreciated Tyrion's efforts and honored him for his services, while Tywin promptly cast him aside and stripped him of his powers the moment the reign of the Lannisters was secure.
  • Lyanna Mormont declaring Jon to King of the North carries a whole new meaning with the revelation of who his mother is. Lyanna birthed him and Lyanna put him on the throne.
  • Cersei's demolition of the Great Sept of Baelor is incredibly symbolic. First of all, it's an act of mass murder, kinslaying (via Kevan and Lancel Lannister), and an exceedingly stupid position in the long political game. In one fell swoop, she destroyed a symbol of greatness (the grand building was a major part of the King's Landing skyline), piety/holiness/goodness/the royal mandate (the sept was built by the famously religious Baelor the Blessed), and all of her chances at being a human with emotions rather than a wrath-filled monster (everyone who cared about her is either dead, have rejected her, or both). Cersei had brought a curse upon herself, by becoming exactly the person Jaime had sacrificed his honor to stop. Without political allies, personal relationships, or indeed godly support (if the Seven is playing their own game of thrones with Westerosi society), she is doomed.
    • The kicker? It's not without reason that Cersei can be referred to as the Mad Queen, per Aerys II, but she is a reprise of another infamous Targaryen ruler, Maegor I the Cruel.
      • Maegor burned down the Sept of Remembrance with dragonfire to fight the Faith Militant. Cersei torched the Great Sept of Baelor with wildfire to fight the Faith Militant.
      • Balerion the Black Dread (which burned the aforementioned Sept, and participated in the prior battle of Blackwater) is ridden by Maegor. Cersei's costume change is black, with a silver pattern that almost looks like scales. Also, the anti-dragon ballista was tested upon Balerion's skull.
      • Maegor also backed the Alchemists' Guild in their creation of wildfire. Cersei probably should thank him for that.

Season 7
  • In Episode 1:
    • Sansa's Costume Switch eerily mirrors Cersei's: black and form-fitting, with decorative silver chains and a fabric and pattern reminiscent of some kind of reptilian armor. As a younger character, Sansa was enamored with Queen Cersei and tried to emulate her style of hair and dress. Now, with this new outfit and her admission that she understands how Cersei thinks, she's still emulating her, if not subsconsciously. In some small dark way, Cersei is Sansa's role model. This does not bode well for Jon...
    • Some found jarring that Arya could flat out admit that she is going to assassinate Cersei in front of several Lannister soldiers and they all laugh it as a joke, instead of taking offense for threaten the Queen. Then one has to remember that at this point, the Lannister family isn't well liked by majority of Westeros to begin with for several reasons (triggering a war on winter's eve, making enemies out of several Great Houses and forcing young men to fight from all sides) and they don't probably don't inspire much loyalty in the conscript soldiers who are Punch Clock Villains, to discipline a girl during their break who for all they know is just making a silly joke and have no idea she is fully intending to carry out her threat. And given that at least half of Westeros would like to see Cersei dead at this point, Arya's remark to the soldiers probably doesn't rate anything more to them than a "Yeah, yeah, get in line."
    • The song "Hands of Gold" is taken from the novels where it refers to Tyrion's relationship with Shae, and the man who writes it is killed off before it spreads, with only Tyrion personally remembering it. In the show, however, it was likely composed about Jaime's relationship with Cersei.
  • In Episode 2, Qyburn reveals to Cersei the secret weapon the Lannisters intend to use against Daenerys's dragons: a ballista. Those that study a bit of history of weapons will take note of the fact that the ballista's general design was eventually shrunk down to hand-size, into a category of weapons we know as crossbows. You could say that the ballista was the "mother" of the crossbow. What was the one weapon Cersei's son, Joffrey, ever killed anyone with, again? This also highlights the fact that Joffrey, while he was certainly an ineffective ruler in addition to being an evil prick, still operated largely on a childish level. He was The Kid with the Remote Control. And even that was severely limited after Tywin arrived. Joffrey will kick a few puppies (figurative and literal), threaten and try to order violence, and gets to kill one or two people from a distance, really doing what suits him with no rhyme or reason. Cersei typically has a plan — or something in her head that sounds to her like a plan. Cersei is evil enough to blow up a several-city-block space and effectively carpet bomb a national monument with you and your associates inside for pissing her off a little bit. If you piss her off a lot, she'll strap you to a table in the lowest dungeon, waterboard you for a few minutes, and then have a silent-but-perpetually-pissed-off zombie-giant rape you over and over again until you're dead. Joffrey, as cruel (and sometimes as story-altering) as his few decisions proved to be, never pulled anything that extreme.
  • In Episode 3:
    • When Olenna is confessing to Jamie that she planned the assassination of Joffrey, she says that she didn't know ahead of time how messy a death the poison would cause. Back in Season 4, when Olenna was talking to Margaery, she lamented that the death was such a huge spectacle, which might have seemed strange when it was later revealed that Olenna had planned the whole thing. With this new information, it finally makes sense, as even though Olenna had planned the assassination she had expected it to be a lot quicker and cleaner.
    • I noticed this episode that Varys has a bit of a tan, which I thought was odd until I realised that he's been in Meereen for months now, so that makes sense. But then I thought "How come Daenarys isn't tanned?", to which the suddenly obvious answer is, she doesn't burn! Although in the previous season while she was held by the Dothraki and forced to walk with her hands tied, she does have a far pinker skin tone that looks like sunburn. On the other hand, whether or not she does get sunburns, it still makes sense that she is pale and Varys has a tan, seeing as how she spent most of ther time in the pyramid while Varys was more out and about.
    • The Tyrell forces going down completely offscreen and not putting much of a fight struck a chord with many viewers. Then you notice that Randyll Tarly (the most renowned and experienced military leader in the Reach and the one credited for dealing Robert his only defeat in his Rebellion) was assisting the Lannister forces in sacking Highgarden, which makes their defeat sound more plausible. Also, as Jaime said last episode, most houses only showed up to the meeting because Randyll did, his alliance with the Lannisters convinced the fence sitters to let them take Highgarden.
    • Why did Bran seem so unconcerned with the fact that his sister was raped when mentioning her wedding night? Because viewing so much of the world's history over the eons has broadened his perspective so much that even common crimes, no matter how personally tragic, simply don't matter compared to much more influential events, such as the creation of the White Walkers. Well, either that or he doesn't know. It's entirely possible all he saw was the ceremony. It's all the tree (which he's leaning on during the conversation) saw, after all.
    • Cersei setting up the Sands to not be able to touch has another purpose than psychological torture. Given the whole I Cannot Self-Terminate nature of the punishment, it also means Ellaria can't kiss her daughter to get any of the poison on her own lips.
  • Archmaester Ebrose putting Sam to work copying a bunch of old scrolls might simply be a case of Dude, Where's My Respect?, but remember that in order to copy those scrolls, Sam also has to read them. Ebrose could be pulling a Stealth Mentor by giving Sam access to learning material he might not otherwise have seen until after months or years of maester training.
  • Jaime's anger at finding out Olenna had poisoned Joffrey goes beyond his eldest son's death. His brother Tyrion, whom he loved so much was framed for Joffrey's death and Jaime helped him to escape, which led to their father Tywin being assassinated and these two following consequences: Tyrion ended up on the run and became Daenerys' adviser while Cersei's following actions (arming the Faith, blowing up the Sept and all other things) which could have been prevented by Tywin if he was alive. In Jaime's point of view, Olenna was the Greater-Scope Villain to his family, having indirectly cause a chain of events that led to its current state and he now just realized he gave her a peaceful and merciful death.
  • Olenna commenting on how Tywin could have just taken over them the moment his mountain ran out of gold makes more sense given how she was always self-depreciative of her house, saying how their alliance with Renly then the Lannisters was stupid, how she ignored every clever men's advice as they are sheeps and even mocking the motto for not being as cool as the others.
  • The fall of House Tyrell is somewhat karmic if one is familiar with the history of Westeros. House Tyrell became the rulers of the Reach by goading the previous rulers, House Gardener, into attacking the Targaryens and having them wiped out. House Tyrell is in turn betrayed by one of their own bannermen (the Tarlys) and wiped out by incestuous conquerors (the Lannisters).
  • The previous seasons have been exploring how the surviving Starks are going beyond their roots; Sansa has to become a manipulative liar to survive, Arya a vengeful killer, Bran the Three Eyed Raven, and Jon a reluctant leader bound to his vows and then recovering from the trauma associated with death and resurrection. They are slowly regaining their old selves as they reunite; at least, Sansa, Jon and Arya are. It also means that they outnumber Littlefinger in four to one, because Arya can see through nonsense and Bran has his powers.
  • In Episode 4:
    • While most viewers are frothing over Dany still wanting Jon to genuflect, pay attention to her word choice when Jon reminds her that the North can't tolerate a Southern ruler after enduring defeat by Joffrey's regime and rule under Tommen. "They will if their king does." Not only does this mark Dany addressing Jon as a fellow monarch for the first time but she is also either: very generously offering the North autonomy as its own kingdom, while keeping friendship and the promise of mutual aid with the Iron Throne; as Renly offered Cat on Robb's behalf. Or she was actually hinting that the only thing Jon has to offer in return for the full commitment of her military forces is... a marriage pact. If Jon wants to remain king, he has to bring something to this partnership. Their children inheriting both halves of the continent would be the major incentive Dany needs to defend the North. Bring on the Wedding of Ice and Fire. Their union would also not count as incest since Westeros doesn't bat an eye at first cousins marrying and even aunts and uncles can take their nephews and nieces as partners respectively without incurring the wrath of the gods. Supporting this is also the fact that (depending on your view) it seems the closest advisers of both monarchs (Missandei and Davos) are already subtly pushing things into that direction — however Strangled by the Red String it may look like to us.
    • Daenerys more often than not direct Drogon's fire on the wagons instead of the men. Seems like pointless Stuff Blowing Up or even counterproductive destruction of rations they could loot, until you consider what else can be in each of those wagons: she was trying to take out any siege (and anti-dragon) weapons before the Lannisters had a chance to use them.
    • A kind of Fridge Heartwarming realization; both this episode and the last make a point that Jon still goes by "Snow," even though he's king and thus capable of legitimizing himself as an official Stark; Stannis offered him that legitimization to go with Winterfell, after all. So why didn't he become Jon Stark? Because a) he didn't proclaim himself king, the North did, so clearly his people don't really care beyond his Stark blood, and b) he doesn't want to usurp his siblings' inheritance or supplant them with his own family line; Sansa is called "Lady Stark," and she herself notes that Bran can claim the title "Lord Stark." Jon is extending his Big Brother Instinct to include the entirety of the remaining Stark legacy; even if he always desired to be a Stark and Lord of Winterfell, he will not take that from his loved ones. Out of universe, of course, it also makes sense because Jon's not just a Stark, thanks to his Targaryen father.
      • This is likely the reason why Ned Stark doesn't ask Robert Baratheon to legitimize Jon. Ned was doing everything he could to protect Jon by hiding his origins, which — if known or speculated — would prompt the wrath of Robert who wanted to kill all Targaryens — and legitimization would bring unwanted attention to Jon. Additionally, on a character level, Ned does not like lying to Jon and the rest of his family about his parentage (he does it because he has to, to protect Jon). Gaining legitimacy for Jon would make that lie "official" in a way that merely telling everyone that Jon is his son (or as Ned says, "my blood") isn't, as well as bringing unwanted interest in who Jon's Missing Mom is, which would put Jon (and potentially the rest of his family) in danger by inviting interest in the truth of Jon's origins.
    • Some people find it still irritating that even Jon tells Dany not to burn down the Red Keep, largely echoing Tyrion's arguments even though, as an educated military man, he should see the potential strategic benefits. But that's not the end of their conversation. The scene cuts away as he finishes saying that unleashing the dragons on a population center would be what any would be tyrant would do, but he almost certainly then continued to point out the obvious regarding the sacking of Highgarden; Cersei's army had to be in the field, and thus totally exposed. And any military commander would recognize that the army would be a far weaker target than the entrenched capital; not only is there absolutely nowhere for soldiers to take shelter from dragonfire, for all the good stone walls would do them against that kind of heat, there's no city for Lannister forces to fall back to, eliminating the probability of Dany having to either turn her dragon or unleash the Dothraki against a civilian population.
      • Even further, Jon, like Jaimie, would have been made to memorize every castle, town, and major pathway in Westeros, and thus likely to correctly pinpoint the location of Cersei's forces; he may even have advised where on the Blackwater Rush to attack the army. And if he had an education in military history (which he had in the books), he may also see how Dany is better equipped for a "Field of Fire" victory than a "Harrenhall" one; the former victory enabled Aegon to subdue two kingdoms at once and was the result of strictly military action, while the latter was the endgame of a diplomatic maneuver to get the Riverlands behind him first, then eliminate the competition. Dany hasn't done the political groundwork for a castle melting, but none is needed for a second Field of Fire.
    • At first glance what Dany says to Jon in the cave about whether his pride is worth more to him than the safety of his people seems to reference back to the things Jon said to Mance in Season 5 when trying to persuade him to kneel to Stannis. But in addition to this, while neither Dany nor Jon appear to realize it at the time, her words far more accurately describe herself than Jon. Jon is not refusing to kneel out of pride, in fact he didn't want to be king at all, and he came down to Dragonstone to plead to her for help (which doesn't scream "pride" but rather "I want to save my people") and he knows that kneeling to her is likely to lose him the support of his people and thereby his chances of leading them to victory against the Night King. Dany, on the other hand, is demanding that he bend the knee to her for no real reason other than that it hurts her pride that he refuses to acknowledge her claim to the throne — which in Westeros at this point rests solely on birthright, since she hasn't had a chance to prove herself worthy yet. If she does believe him about the White Walkers then she is the one putting her pride above the survival of everyone in Westeros (if not the world).
    • Daenerys could have won the Battle of the Blackwater Rush with only the Dothraki, but she used Drogon anyways, inflicting a truly hellish curb-stomping on the Lannister forces. Leaving aside the Catharsis Factor and pragmatic concerns (sparing as many of her own much-needed warriors as possible), this choice also serves a higher purpose: it's a crude but effective way of Talking Through Technique. It's been over a century since a Targaryen Dragon Rider last took to the field. The idea of a dragon is scary, yes, and any commander worth their salt will be familiar with the strategies involved in Aegon's Conquest, but it's still largely an abstract in the mind of the general public. Dramatically incinerating the soldiers at the Rush sends a clear message to everyone in the conflict, rank-and-file and commanders alike: "I could easily obliterate any of you if I so wished. Raise arms against me and you will die screaming." Many a bannerman is likely to have second thoughts about continuing to serve the Lannister cause; Cersei, for all her cruelty, is going to be hard-pressed to be scarier than actual dragons.
  • In Episode 5, Brienne is one of the few characters to have a Valyrian steel sword, and really knows how to use it. While she could've joined Jon's group in finding a wight, she was also tasked in a previous episode with training new soldiers for the upcoming invasion. Plus, given the fact that the atmosphere among the northern lords is rather poisonous, Sansa may need her protection.
  • In Episode 6:
    • In "Hardhome", Loboda dies instantly from a stab to the midsection, falling down flat without a scream. Add how his axe shattered at the mere contact of the spear and it gives a good idea about what happened to Viserion's insides.
    • Thoros died the way he lived, drenched in alcohol. Alcohol also makes it easier for people to die of hypothermia, due to it lowering their core body temperature. Thoros was the only person who was constantly drinking on the trip, and the only one who froze to death.
    • When Daenerys sees Jon in the ship at the end of the episode and sees him covered in wounds, it is very reminiscent of Khal Drogo. Throughout the season she was fixated on Davos's Freudian Slip about Jon taking a knife for his own people, something she remembered was Drogo's downfall when he let a knife wound untreated allowing it to fester and ruin him. She also tried to invoke a blood magic ritual to resurrect Drogo, and that failed leading her to revive dragons via Human Sacrifice of Miri Maaz Duur. So her attraction to Jon Snow stems partly from being handsome and sincere, and enigmatic but also as a Replacement Goldfish in that he survived and returned to life in a manner just like her First Love failed to do so. Miri Maaz Duur said "Only death can pay for life".
    • Jon is also a Composite Character of the multiple men Dany has attracted and felt attraction to, as she points out to Tyrion by listing the foolish heroic types she has met:
      • Like Khal Drogo, Jon is the elected leader of his people, who leads by Asskicking Equals Authority and is by Westerosi standards a Barbarian Hero (he leads an army of Wildlings, introduces new policies and ideas which they see as anathema, he is a bastard, the North is seen as a harsher and more savage land with harsher and more savage people by the rest of the Seven Kingdoms).
      • Like Daario Naharis, Jon tends to be disrespectful and even mocking of Dany's royal hauteur and presumption, being one of the few who is not easily impressed with her titles and lineage alone, which Dany tends to mock and rebuke in public, but privately (or not so privately) finds a turn-on.
      • Like Jorah, Jon is from the North of Westeros, and given Jon's connection to Jorah's father Jeor, he is more or less, in Dany's eyes, what Mormont should have been: young, handsome, his honor never lost or stained, and someone who rather than indulge in slavery contrary to Northern traditions, brought the Wildlings into the Seven Kingdoms contrary to Northern traditions, while also being the same age as she, truly becoming her equal in a way that neither Jorah or her other beaus could be.
    • A sort of Fridge Tragic; Sandor "fucking hopes" he doesn't see Beric again because he knows that without Thoros, Beric is in full Death Seeker mode, and he's tired of being around to see his friends die.
    • Tormund tells the Hound "they" said he was mean. Who is they? Well, Beric tells Jon that Tormund told him that Jon had been resurrected, so Tormund probably meant Thoros and Beric.
    • Jon was returned to Daenerys by a horse, the de-facto sigil of the Dohtraki which was once led by Dany's late husband.
    • Jon is finally reunited with his long-lost maternal uncle only for him to perform a Heroic Sacrifice so Jon could return to the woman whom unbeknownst to him is his paternal aunt, whom in turn is also unaware of their relation. Said uncle and aunt are also the youngest among their respective siblings.
  • How did Tyrion get word to Bronn to arrange the meeting with Jaime? Varys probably still has access to his network of little birds. How did Cersei find out? Same way. Qyburn has access to the same group of orphaned kids running around King's Landing.
  • The maester that recorded his own bowel movements comes off as absurd on its own (and Sam's frustration at it turns what should have been a Wham Line into an offhanded comment). But, when you think about it, given that one of the functions of a maester was as a physician, and more modern medicine has revealed that one can find out quite a bit about one's health by observing their stool, the maester probably wasn't just doing it for shits and giggles — and may have been on to something of a medical advance in Westeros if anyone had cared to pay attention.
    • Except that they were reading the personal notes of a High Septon, not a Maester.
  • Benjen abruptly arriving to save Jon seems like a Deus ex Machina, but consider Benjen previously mentions undermining the White Walkers from this side of the wall. Could he have blended into the Wight army being the only person "alive" they wouldn't ever detect?
  • Ser Jorah dispatches the polar bear wight by flanking it and then stabbing it in the ear with a dagger. The Mormont ancestral land is Bear Island, so named because many bears dwell in the woods. He probably learned at a very early age how to take down a bear quickly.
  • In Episode 7:
    • When Arya was speaking with Tywin in Season 2 she makes it known she looks up to Visenya Targaryen, a great warrior who had her sword Dark Sister. When Sansa and Arya were talking they point out that Sansa passed the sentence on Littlefinger but Arya carried it out, taken with Syrio’s lessen on the steel "becoming part of your arm" and Arya’s idea for dealing with problematic people being the kill them, of the two Stark girls, Arya became a living Dark Sister for Sansa.
      • Ned's biggest lesson to his sons? "The man who passes the sentence should swing the sword." Sansa failed to do this, though as a young girl, it was unlikely Ned chose to give her that bit of parental wisdom. However, she could have lived up to it in a metaphorical sense. . . Arya is her sword.
    • Connected to the above Jon we now know his real name is Aegon Targaryen, the original Aegon conquered Westeros with his two sister-wives Rhaenys and Visenya. The new Aegon has two "sisters". One is known for being a strong warrior with a named sword who has knowledge of poison and sorcery (which Visenya allegedly did) and prefers a straight forward approach to things. The other is considered more a natural beauty, graceful, and a proper lady in mannerisms and was known for loving stories and poetry (just as Sansa did at the start) but was better at working with people than Visenya, just as Sansa has learned to listen and manipulate others as needed. Also like Aegon, Jon left ruling and day to day administration in the hands of his sister while he prepared for war. They basically are the Targaryen conquerors reborn.
  • In Episode 3, Jon's plain title "King in the North" contrasted with Dany's many grandiose titles is Played for Laughs, but is also a Deconstruction of Modest Royalty. As Melisandre mused in her character chapter from A Dance with Dragons, eschewing the trappings of power is itself a kind of arrogance which undermines ones authority. Since Jon was too modest to assume any title other than the one given to him, he comes off as much less important than Dany and therefore is at a disadvantage during their initial negotiation.
  • In Episode 7, Euron Greyjoy insults both Tyrion and Theon during the Dragonpit Meeting and stirs tensions among the group that makes even Cersei to order him to stand down. It's revealed much later that Cersei planned to have Euron leaves the meeting early so he can sail to Essos to get the Golden Company for her. Euron being an asshole during the meeting was him trying to find an excuse to get kicked out by Cersei, though he did get another convenient excuse anyway when Jon presented the wight. Either way, Euron was planning to leave the meeting early all along.

Fridge Horror

  • Maester Luwin thought that his last act would be to send Bran and Rickon to the safety of their half-brother Jon at Castle Black, rather than the wars tearing up the south. Unfortunately by the looks of it — as Bran and Rickon don't manage to make it to Castle Black — south would have been the better choice in spite of everything. Welcome to the Zombie Apocalypse, kids! This becomes Ascended Fridge Horror, since Bran's party is attacked by a gang of wights and Jojen Reed dies as a result in addition to Rickon and Hodor dying thereafter.
  • Roose Bolton remarks to Lord Karstark upon finding the hundreds of dead Northmen in Harrenhal that "The debt will be repaid, my friend. For them and for your sons." Upon first glance this appears to be a show of solidarity by Bolton for a still grieving ally, but then you remember that Karstark is still furious over Catelyn's freeing of his son's killer, and that this may be a sign of Bolton turning on the Starks, especially given his son's recent sacking of an unarmed Winterfell. It's also an echo of "The Lannisters Always Pay Their Debts."
  • In "Two Swords": The show lingers for about five seconds on a recent golden statue of Joffrey holding a crossbow and stepping on the head of a slain direwolf. Obviously, it was commissioned to celebrate his 'victory' over Robb Stark. Funny and telling of the obnoxious parts of his personality, right? Now imagine being Sansa, and having to walk past that statue every time you're in that part of the palace.
  • Meryn Trant is revealed to be an ephebophile who gets off on beating girls. This explains his enthusiasm for abusing Sansa in earlier seasons. Imagine what he might have tried to do to an 11-year-old Arya if she hadn't escaped.
  • When Jaime is leaving the Dreadfort, Locke taunts him about his hand and that he will "look after your friend". When Jaime doesn't reply, Locke says, "I don't remember chopping your balls off." Then we cut to the infamous scene where Ramsay castrates Theon.
  • On the subject of Theon, Season 5's "Unbowed, Unbent, Unbroken" presents us with Ramsay forcing him to watch as Sansa is deflowered. The "Horror" comes in when you realize that Ramsay likely intended this as a punishment for both Theon and Sansa for Sansa's refusal to take Theon's arm as Ramsay had requested.
  • Jaime comes back to King's Landing to find that Cersei has demolished the Sept of Baelor and killed countless people within it in and outside. How? Through one of the Mad King's hidden caches of wildfire beneath it. Years before, he became perhaps the most hated man in the Seven Kingdoms by breaking his oath and killing his king explicitly to prevent any of these caches from being lit. He's taken consolation and even pride in the good that sacrifice did. And now Cersei has rendered that sacrifice partly null. It's possible Cersei only knew about those caches because Jaime told her.
  • The Iron Bank of Braavos invests in the slave trade. Braavos was founded by escaped slaves, and in the books their First Law is that no-one in their city shall ever be a slave. The hypocrisy is nauseating.
    • They don't have to invest directly in slave trade to suffer an economic downturn from its elimination. They're operating the closest thing in the setting to a global economy where everything affects everything, and a huge change in the political balance is going to echo throughout the system with negative consequences to any and all long term investments.
  • As of Season 7's Episode 3, the Sand Snakes are now dead... Except that wasn't all of them. Ellaria had other daughters, one of them being Elia Sand who is name-dropped in a few episodes, and they can't be older than little girls. Who is going to protect them now that their mother is as good as dead?
  • Considering the truth of Jon's parentage, Aerys' murder of Rickard and Brandon Stark is even more horrifying when you realize that Jon's paternal grandfather murdered his maternal grandfather and uncle.
  • In Season 7's Episode 4:
    • The Reach's smallfolk will likely starve now that their rations and crops were stolen by the Lannisters and Tarlys. Even worse following the closing battle of the episode, as many of those rations were likely destroyed. Now no one will be able to use them during the Long Night.
    • The opening of the Lannister/Dothraki fight was epic and cathartic. Dany rode in on Drogon and started raising hell. And the scene kept going and going with Dany coming around again and again to burn more people, despite the fact that her Khalasar probably could have taken over and still won handily. Then, the cuts to men burning and trying to douse themselves in the swamp started getting unsettling. Seeing the carnage from Bronn's perspective as he raced through the battlefield to get to the ballista revealed the extent of the Mook Horror Show the Lannister soldiers were experiencing, clearly demonstrating that War Is Hell. Also counts as Fridge Brilliace in that the scene was perfectly done to make you worried about the Mad King's daughter's sanity.
    • Had Jaime succeeded in killing Dany, the war wouldn't have ended then and there, because in that scenario you have tens of thousands of Dothraki screamers stranded on Westeros, and you've just killed the only person who was holding them back. With a significant portion of the last remaining southern army dead on that field — with Westeros' best military commander likely among them — the Dothraki would have had free rein over the Reach and the Stormlands, reverting back to their old ways.
      • The Dothraki is bad enough, but Dany's three dragons would now be wild and free to roam without anyone controlling them. And in that scenario you have Drogon, who has a strong protective bond with his Mother, enraged and bursting with renewed adrenaline willing to tear the world, more or less creating a firestorm that would have torched the countryside and then going on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge that will make Westeros long for the cold of the Long Night. Daenerys is more or less a Load-Bearing Boss.
      • Daenerys was also the only thing keeping the Dothraki unified and not fighting each other, so her death might have at least mixed results. Dragons without human riders are also somewhat easier for human armies to pick off — their riders are usually careful enough to keep them out of range from arrow and scorpion fire, but dragons will just blindly charge at any threat.
      • Even worse is that it would have likely resulted in Jaime dying by Drogon, meaning not only a bunch of Dothraki are pillaging the countryside while dragons are burning castles, but Cersei will likely let them as long as they aren't coming to King's Landing and her only potential field commander is Euron. The White Walkers almost feel like a mercy at this point.
  • In Episode 5, Jon's band plans to bring a wight, an animated corpse, to King's Landing, home to Qyburn, who has already successfully brought someone back from death or near death. The Old and the New Gods only know what he plans to do with it when he sees it.
  • In Episode 6:
    • Viserion, "son" to the breaker of chains, has his corpse put to chains and dragged out of a frozen lake in order to be turned into an undead dragon, meaning by extension a weapon against his "mother".
    • The books explain that the reason Daenerys named Viserion after her brother was because, while Viserys was weak, cruel and frightened, his dragon would do what he couldn't. Now that the Night King has "woken" the dragon, not only will he be used against Daenerys and her Dothraki but he'll also be used to conquer the Seven Kingdoms and destroy the usurpers currently reigning, along with everyone else. This would essentially avenge Viserys and accomplish everything he wanted to do in life, except in the most nightmarish way possible.
    • Look at the beasts on the Night King's dispatch: a bear, a horse, and finally a dragon. Bears are House Mormont's sigil, which Jorah is a member (and was The Leader) of. Horses are the de-facto sigil of the Dohtraki, which was led by Dany's first husband Khal Drogo. And dragons, are of course, the sigil of Dany's house. This episode also features what is widely regarded as Dany's greatest defeat yet.
  • *Gasp* The jarred fetuses of Selyse Baratheon are still in Dragonstone! Oh, the poor Dothraki or Unsullied who got freaked out coming upon those.
  • As of Season 7, there is essentially no one left alive north of the Wall. Meaning that the Free Folk have suffered a near-complete genocide, with the only survivors (numbering only a few thousand) having fled south from Hardhome under Tormund's leadership. And they're manning the Wall, meaning they'll be the first ones in danger if/when the White Walkers breach it. As much of a threat the White Walkers are to the rest of Westerosi society, the Wildlings and their culture have already been mostly eradicated by them. A people whose traditions have remained intact for thousands of years, who are the among last remnants of pre-feudal Westerosi civilization, all but wiped out.
  • The White Walkers have breached the Wall and can raise corpses, however badly decayed. What will happen when they come across graveyards?

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