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Film: Saving Mr. Banks

Saving Mr. Banks is a movie directed by John Lee Hancock and based on the true story of the production of the 1964 Disney classic Mary Poppins. Emma Thompson stars as P.L. Travers, author of the original Mary Poppins novels, who after much resistance, finally travels to Hollywood to serve as a consultant on the adaptation of the movie. There she meets Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) and his staff of writers and musicians who are hard at work adapting her story to the screen. However, having been given unprecedented creative control in return for the film rights, Travers shows herself to be a tough person to work with considering her demands range from reasonable, to the ridiculously obstructive.

Intercut with this is the story of Travers' childhood in Australia, particularly focused on her relationship with her father (Colin Farrell), a banker who is filled with energy and happiness, but whose health and career are at constant risk due to his alcoholism. As the two stories play out, it is eventually revealed why Travers is so protective of her story, and Disney realizes what he has to do to make the movie work.

The movie was released on December 13, 2013 in the US, but opened on November 29, 2013 in the UK. The trailer can be seen here.


"Troping Mr. Banks":

  • Abusive Parents. As much as Walt loved his father, Elias Disney would be most likely considered to fit this trope by modern audiences. Elias ran a newspaper delivery business in Kansas City, Missouri, and being a cheapskate, insisted that eight-year-old Walt and his older brother Roy act as his delivery boys rather than paying actual employees. Walt describes plunging into snowdrifts over his head as a child, twice a day, to deliver the morning and the evening papers, while wearing worn clothes and leaky shoes because his father didn't want to have to pay for anything, and then sitting through school, unable to concentrate due to being soaking wet and exhausted. And if he or his brother objected to the work, his father would whip them with the buckle end of his belt.
  • Adaptation Decay: Travers considers it her duty to prevent this from happening. She doesn't succeed.
  • Alcoholic Parent: Travers Goff.
  • Anachronism Stew: Travers is greeted into her room with a bunch of Disney character plushes, one of which is a Winnie the Pooh doll. Disney's version of Pooh didn't hit the screen until 1966.
    • Zig-zagged in regards to Disneyland. Several changes were made to the real one to make it look like how it was during Walt's time (i.e. the area in front of the train station is lined with attraction posters). However Fantasyland remains unchanged despite going through a complete renovation in 1983, less than 20 years after the release of Mary Poppins. Since the renovation involved intensive rebuilding of ride exteriors and moving the location of some of the actual rides (such as the carousel), changing it back for the film would have been impossible.
    • Also almost all of the suited Disney characters at the park are the modern versions, with the exception of Mickey at the premier.
    • The modern Walt Disney Animation Studios logo also prominently appears several times within the context of the movie. Which is especially curious considering that the actual opening Vanity Plate has some retro touches.
  • Artistic License - History: No, P.L Travers didn't like the final version of Mary Poppins, hence why Disney only got to do 1 book from the series. However, then it wouldn't make the story they were telling of her learning to let go of the past flow as well. Not to mention make for a bit of a Downer Ending from the company standpoint.
    • In a way though, they kind of kept Traver's opinion of the final product ambiguous; she definitely looks mortified when she sees specific scenes she objected to, and though we see her crying later, it could be either crying because she hates it or crying because of the memories it invokes of her father. Also, you can hate a film but still acknowledge it has redeeming moments.
      • For what it's worth, according to IMDB, Travers said in a 1977 interview that, "It's glamorous and it's a good film on its own level, but I don't think it is very like my books."
    • Another example, in real life, Travers signed over the rights before any consulting was done and before she even traveled to Los Angeles.
    • According to Richard Sherman, Travers and Disney didn't have many interactions face-to-face as the movie depicts. Most of their communication was over the phone.
  • Blunt Yes: When Travers indignantly asks if they're implying Mrs. Banks is a neglectful mother, Don and Richard hem and haw uncomfortably, but Bob...
    Bob: Yup.
  • Bookends: The film starts and ends with flashbacks of Travers' childhood while Colin Farrell recites the lyrics to Chim Chim Cher-ee, as sung at the beginning of the Mary Poppins film and stage show.
    Farrell: Wind's in the east. Mist coming in.
    Like something is brewing, about to begin.
    Can't put me finger on what lies in store,
    But I feel what's to happen all happened before.
  • Butt Monkey: A mild example, with Walt's secretary, whom Mrs. Travers treats as the butt of her barbs.
  • Comically Missing the Point: When Travers inquires about the penguins, specifically asking if they're going to be trained, dancing penguins, one of the Sherman Brothers brightly informs her they will be animated. She immediately storms out and he gets dirty looks from all around...which leads him to wonder if they are going to be live, train penguins.
  • Defrosting Ice Queen: Travers.
  • Development Hell: In-universe. It took over 20 years for Disney to get the film rights to Travers' books.
  • Dies Wide Open: Travers Goff.
  • Disabled Means Helpless: Shot down when Travers gives Ralph, whose wheelchair-using daughter is said to not get out much, a laundry list of famous people with physical or mental disabilities, including his own employer.
  • Disneyfication: invokedThe Movie. It's all about an author fighting this approach to her work (by Walt Disney himself, no less) and losing.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me!: Walt Disney says this after talking about how his father Elias Disney would send him out in the morning and evening to deliver newspapers in deep snowdrifts. He says his life is a miracle, and his father was a good parent, and to move on from the past to make a brighter future in fiction.
    • Travers also seems to carry this attitude about her, and encourages her driver Ralph to not feel sorry for his wheelchair-bound daughter, to know that she can do anything.
  • Dramatically Missing the Point: In-story, when Travers complains that they are making her story too whimsical, and that Mary Poppins (the character) is has no sense of whimsy about her, Disney tries to call her out on it. It doesn't work, but does lead him to make the dramatic realization as to why she's so guarded with the story.
    Walt Disney: "'No whimsy or sentiment', says the woman who sends a flying nanny with a talking umbrella to save the children.
    P.L. Travers: (beat) "You think Mary Poppins is saving the children, Mr. Disney?" (looks at the other filmmakers, then back to Disney). "Oh, dear."
  • Eureka Moment: When Disney finds out P.L. Travers's real name, Helen Goff. He's able to figure out that she took her father's first name Travers as her surname, and is loyal to him. This allows him to perform armchair psychology on her.
  • Executive Meddling: Zig-Zagged In-Universe. For the most part, it's Travers who meddles with the production, but Walt Disney makes demands of his own, such as his insistence, against Travers' wishes, that Mr. Banks be given a moustache.
    • Which Travers Goff (the inspiration for Mr. Banks) did have in real life (but not in the film).
  • First Name Basis: Everybody in Disney's inner circle. Averted by Travers, who insists on being called "Mrs. Travers", except by Ralph the chauffeur. When she calls Disney Walter, late in the film, it marks her change of heart.
  • Foregone Conclusion: The movie gets made. And they keep the dancing animated penguins.
  • Foreshadowing: Walt has a particularly nasty cough in the film which foreshadows his real-life death from lung cancer in 1966.
    • In an early scene, Travers throws all the pears out of the fruit basket Walt sent her. It's revealed later that she was out buying pears when her father died.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: In a later scene in Walt's office there is a map of Florida; in the late 60's Walt and his team were in the process buying up land there for Walt Disney World. And right behind that map is Rolly Crump's iconic concept art for The Haunted Mansion's canceled Museum of the Weird.
  • Freudian Excuse: The flashbacks suggest that Mrs Travers' crabby, fastidious personality is a result of being traumatised by her father.
  • Fun Personified: Tom Hanks's performance as Walt Disney is largely played as this, though there is a sense of his more ruthless businessman side as well.
  • Gray and Gray Morality: While both Mrs. Travers and Walt Disney are depicted in a sympathetic light, both of them have many,many flaws, ranging from the former's discourteous behaviour to the latter's explicit duplicitousness.
  • Hide Your Lesbians: Absolutely no mention is made of the fact that, during the time of the film's events, P.L. Travers was engaging in an openly lesbian relationship with her live-in girlfriend, and the girlfriend in question is never once seen.
  • Historical Hero Upgrade: Even Walt's grandniece thought the film was "brazen attempt by the company to make a saint out of the man".
    • Downplayed. While he's still portrayed as a good person, he does wench on his promise to Travers not to have any animation in the film, and he deliberately tries to snub her at the premiere.
    • However, seeing that the real Walt Disney was thought (falsely) to be racist, anti-Semitic and misogynistic, it would be hard to sell that kind of person in a feel good movie. Hence the upgrade.
  • I Need a Freaking Drink: After Walt Disney shows up on Mrs. Travers's London doorstep, she adds whiskey to her tea instead of sugar. Walt happily does the same, though he may be mirroring her to gain her trust.
  • Insistent Terminology: It's "Mrs. Travers", not Pamela or Pam.
    • Or "Missus", for Ralph. He eventually gets it.
    • And in Mary Poppins' case, it's never just Mary.
    • The Disney Studios also insists that everyone be referred to on a first name basis, which obviously conflicts with the previous two.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Mrs. Travers.
  • Logo Joke: The classic blue-and-white Disney Vanity Plate that was first introduced in 1985 is used as the Vanity Plate for this film, with "Walt Disney Presents" written in a retro font.
  • Los Angeles: Mrs Travers is not a fan, "It smells like chlorine... and sweat".
  • Manchild: After painting Walt as one throughout the entire movie and disdaining the toys and merchandise his employees have presented her and that he has in his office, Travers goes onto the lawn after a breakdown in the rehearsal room and starts to build a house of twigs and leaves like she did as a child. She even pulls Ralph into it.
    • Travers Goff is a much darker example to the point of deconstruction. His boyish demeanor endears him to his children but doesn't serve him well in the professional arena, which drives him toward alcoholism.
  • Manic Pixie Dream Girl: The non-Flashback storyline is essentially a Gender Flipped version of this, with Travers as the stuffed-shirt and the Disney team (most notably the Sherman brothers, whose talents convince her to let the movie be a musical, and Ralph, "the only American she's ever liked," but even Walt himself by the end) as the fun-loving people who defrost her.
  • No Smoking: While Disney was very lenient on showing Walt in a non-biased light, they were insistent that Walt would not be shown smoking on screen.
    • The movie itself lampshades this in a scene where Travers storms into Walt's office and he's just putting out a cigarette, saying "Don't want anyone to see me smoke, wouldn't want to encourage bad behavior".
    • According to an interview with Hanks, the MPAA gives an automatic "R" rating to a film that displays a character lighting a cigarette and then smoking it.
  • Not So Different: Mrs. Travers and Bob Sherman both have very little tolerance for each other's brand of silliness and she kicks him out of the rehearsal room at one point after he calls her on her nagging (in Bob's defense, getting shot will do that to you).
    • Disney talks to Richard Sherman about how he understands how a creator can be very protective of their creation, and so is willing to put up with Travers's eccentricities.
    Walt Disney: "I've fought this battle from her side. Pat Powers, he wanted the mouse and I didn't have a bean back then. He was this big terrifying New York producer and I was just a kid from Missouri with a sketch of Mickey, but it would've killed me to give him up. Honest to God, killed me. That mouse, he's family."
  • OOC Is Serious Business: When the baby starts crying and her mother does not tend to her, it's a signal to Pamela that something is wrong with her mother.
  • Oh Crap: A minor one from the Sherman Brothers. When Travers complains about the word "responstable" and wishes them to unmake it, they covertly push the sheet music of "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" under their current work.
    • Another much bigger one when it was accidentally revealed to Mrs. Travers by one of the brothers that the dancing penguins would be animated — after they promised there would not be any animation of any sort in the film.
    • Walt gets one when he sees that Mrs. Travers has shown up for the Los Angeles premiere, and he has to put on a teeth-clenched grin after seeing her in his office unannounced.
  • Only in It for the Money: Why Mrs. Travers finally agrees to meet Walt to work on the film. Her book had stopped selling and she was broke. Her agent uses this to convince her to go. She still goes with no intention of signing the rights over.
  • Revenge SVP: Walt purposely didn't invite Travers to the premiere in order to 'protect the picture' and Travers initially had no intention of going until her agent talked her into it. She then invited herself, showing up out of the blue in Walt's office, much to his shock.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer: Colin Farrell, despite playing a large role (however, the trailer begins with his voiceover). Very little of Mrs. Travers' childhood is seen in the trailers as well.
  • Shout-Out: Tons, to Mary Poppins as well as the entire library.
  • Shown Their Work: In the film, Travers insists that all of their conversations are to be recorded, so that Disney's staff cannot go back on what they have agreed upon. During the credits, one of the actual reel-to-reel tapes is heard.
  • So My Kids Can Watch: In-Universe. Disney pursued the rights to the Mary Poppins story for 20 years because he promised his daughters he would make it into a movie.
  • Supporting Protagonist: Discussed. This is what the title refers to, as Travers makes it clear that Poppins is not there to save the children. Walt later puts two and two together that Mr. Banks is the one who is being saved. Thus the story is altered to have some of the most moving moments of the film involving Mr. Banks.
  • Those Two Guys: Jason Schwartzman and B.J. Novak as Richard and Robert Sherman, the composers of the film's score. The actors actually trained alongside Richard Sherman so they could mimic their piano and singing perfectly.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: How Mrs. Travers sees Walt Disney, that he wants Mary Poppins as another brick in his empire.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The lives of Travers's mother and sisters are not accounted for at any point during the contemporary storyline (a little strange considering the emphasis on them in the flashbacks). Further irony abounds in the fact that it was her mother and not her father that P.L. Travers dedicated Mary Poppins to.
    • The film depicts Robert Sherman's limp and mentions it was because he was shot, but offers no further elaboration. Robert Sherman was actually wounded in combat during World War II while liberating the Dachau concentration camp. He walked with a limp for the rest of his life.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Probably the most Jerkass thing Disney does in the entire movie is intentionally not invite Travers to the premiere of the adaptation of her own damn book, fearing she would give the film bad publicity and telling his secretary, "We have to protect the picture." His secretary is clearly slackjawed at what a dick move this is. Travers' agent outright tells her this is an affront Mary Poppins wouldn't stand for, convincing Travers to crash the premiere.
    • Travers gets one when, after ejecting Bob Sherman from the reading, she notes he limps and asks why. On told it's because he was shot, she says "I'm not surprised." Given he was shot in the war after leading one of the first units liberating Dachau, it's more of a jerkass thing to say even than it sounds.


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