YMMV / The Fast and the Furious


  • Acceptable Targets: When the team has to assault a Russian submarine base to prevent Cipher from stealing nuclear missiles, they don't have to fight the Russian military. Conveniently, the base was taken over by "Russian separatists" so there's no political fallout when the mooks are killed in droves.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Was the alliance between Deckard Shaw and Jakande genuine, like the narrative somehow implies in contrast with the "not friends, but family" relationships among Dom's team, or it was merely business? If it was a true Villainous Friendship, then Jakande firing the missiles against Dom and Deckard at seeing that Shaw was gonna be captured would take a new sense as opposed to a simple opportunistic backstab, considering that Deckard would have to go through a really, really hard life experience if a government put its hands on him.
    • And for the matter of the Shaw brothers, Owen mentioned that he got his code of 'Precision' from Deckard. That trait made him into the heartless bastard he is in the sixth movie, but comes the seventh, Deckard forgets all about that and just goes all Roaring Rampage of Revenge on Dom's crew because they crippled Owen, alone. Does this mean the Shaw brothers have some Hidden Depths within them, and that deep down they're not really that different from Dom when it comes to the importance of family?
    • The eighth film backs up the interpretation that both Deckard and Owen take family seriously. They're both loyal to their mother, and Deckard makes amends to Dom after he gives him the location of where Owen is being held.
    • In the eight movie, Deckard beats a mook to death for shooting at a baby. This results in two interpretations of the character. Either he didn't know about Brian's son in the seventh movie when he sent a bomb to his house in an attempt to kill him and is true to his values, or he did know and is a complete and utter hypocrite.
  • Award Snub: Despite feats such as peeking at #1 at the Billboard Top 100 after starting at #100 in only five weeks, breaking a record that had stood since 1959, being nominated for a Golden Globe and then winning a Critics Choice Award, "See You Again" from Furious 7 was not nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Song.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Roman has started turning into a controversial character due to a perceived decay on the quality of his comic relief and the fact that he is noticeably the most static character in the franchise.
    • Scott Eastwood's inclusion as Little Nobody in The Fate of the Furious has been met with controversy, as his character does little for the plot and instead eats screentime that would be better used for other characters, in special his superior Mr. Nobody, played by the much more popular Kurt Russell.
    • Madgalene Shaw. Her appearance is either a hilarious and awesome addition to the Shaws (and the franchise, considering who plays the good mama) or the point in which the brothers lose definitely their menacing aura.
  • Broken Base: The franchise's famous tendence to insert the events of every installment into a bigger picture in the next (often in a heavy-handed way or using Retcon in plenty) is considered both a sign of ingenuity on the writers's part and an inevitable source of controversial and unexpected plot twists. The discussion reached its peak at the eight film, which puts a lot of effort to turn the irreedemable villains of the two previous into heroic unwitting pawns at the expense of their characterization.
  • Complete Monster: Cipher, the Big Bad of the eighth film and the Greater-Scope Villain of the series, is a powerful hacker and cyber terrorist with the goal of becoming a one-woman army by obtaining some nuclear codes. Initially posing as a random woman in Cuba, she quickly blackmails Dom into betraying his family and aiding her by having Elena and her newborn son (Dom's child) kidnapped and kept as bargaining chips. As she attacks Mr. Nobody's headquarters to steal the God's Eye, it is also revealed that she caused Owen Shaw's fall into villainy, which earns her Deckard's hate. In New York, Cipher takes controls of hundreds of remote-controlled cars and crash them everywhere, causing untold chaos and panic just to get to the Russian minister who has the nuclear codes. When Dom allows Letty to escape with the codes, Cipher responds by killing Elena in front of Dom and his child. When Deckard Shaw invades her plane at the end, she avoids defeat by jumping out, fully expecting him to stop Dom's son from falling to his death. Cipher is an utter sociopath and hypocrite, praising the freedom of doing whatever one wishes but delighting in taking this freedom away from others, and commits her crimes simply she wants to. She doesn't understand love and affection above an evolutionary level and crosses many lines, on global but also on personal levels, such as when she kisses Dom in front of Letty For the Evulz.
  • Critical Dissonance: Every film in the franchise. Each film has a higher audience score on Rotten Tomatoes than the actual critic score. The fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth films have audience scores in the 80%'s
  • Crowning Music of Awesome: Almost every song in the series. Ludacris? Teriyaki Boyz? N.E.R.D? Don Omar? deadmau5? Cypress Hill? Peaches? Huh-uh.
    • "See You Again" from the seventh movie, which is a Tear Jerker if ever there was one.
  • Designated Hero: Dom and his crew frequently use plans that cause massive collateral damage and put innocent people in danger, but the films gloss over any potential casualties. In Fast Five they flat out murder over a dozen police officers when they break into the police station and escape with the vault full of money, and the movie glosses over saying the police are all corrupt. And yet Dom insists that they aren't killers.
    • To be fair, in the sixth film, Dom and the crew (plus Letty, whose on Owen Shaw's team) are shocked when Shaw hijacks a tank and begins running over people, leading them to try to stop him from hurting anyone else by stopping the tank.
  • Ear Worm:
    • "Act a Fool" from the second movie and "Tokyo Drift" from the third.
    • "We Own It" from the sixth film. Even if you don't like Wiz Khalifa and/or 2 Chainz, the chorus is damn catchy.
    • "Danza Kuduro" in the fifth.
    • "Get Low" from the seventh, used in many of the commercials and the Forza Horizon standalone expansion based on F&F.
    • "Payback", also from seventh, playing during Deckard Shaw's Establishing Character Moment opening scene.
    • "See You Again" from the seventh as well. The chorus alone and Charlie Puth's crooning will get stuck in your head.
  • Even Better Sequel: Fast Five and Furious 7 have the highest Rotten Tomatoes ratings in the series at 78% and 82%, respectively (compared to 53% for the first installment).
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Han in Tokyo Drift, who during early test screenings scored a literal 100 percent audience approval rating, and who is arguably the reason the fourth, fifth and sixth movies exist as Interquels.
    • On the villains' side, the Shaw brothers count as this as arguably the most badass villains in the franchise. Probably helps that they're played by popular actors like Luke Evans and Jason Statham. To put this into more perspective, audiences marked out at the sixth movie's post-credits sequence when Deckard was shown as Han's murderer, while Owen serves as the villain for the Supercharged ride. Their popularity no doubt helped contribute to their redemption and joining up with Dom's Team during the events of Fate of the Furious.
    • Brian Toretto, Dom's son.
  • Evil Is Cool: As mentioned above, the Shaw brothers are considered the most badass villains in the franchise and are even considered among some of the best action movie villains in a long time.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Cipher, in spades. A sultry anarchist meet high-tech terrorist. Being played by Charlize Theron helps.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • $327 million in the US is certainly nothing to sneeze at, but Furious 7 made over $1 billion across the rest of the world, good enough to make it the fourth-highest grossing movie ever at the time (it quickly dropped two spots to #6 later that same year). The biggest market for the movie was China, where it is #1 all-time over there earning the equivalent of $337 million.
    • From the beginning, the series has also been known for having a large and very dedicated Latino fanbase.
    • Tokyo Drift flopped Stateside, not even coming close to making back its budget and marketing costs. It would likely have been the Franchise Killer for the series, had it not done a lot better outside the U.S. and had strong DVD sales, which were enough to convince the studio to take a gamble on a fourth film.
  • God-Mode Sue: To the point that it's rumored all the major actors actually have in their contracts that they can't ever lose a fight onscreen.
  • Growing the Beard: The first four movies had their fans, but it was generally a niche audience and they received mixed-to-negative reviews. With Fast Five, however, reception rose dramatically, both from critics and the public, a trend that continued to the next movies.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Han's desire for superficial relationships/keeping people at arm's length in Tokyo Drift after watching Gisele die to save him in Fast & Furious 6. It would also seem to explain his devil may care attitude about everything and "Money isn't everything." comment.
    • Paul Walker, who played Brian O'Conner, being killed in a car crash becomes one considering that speeding cars is the bread-and-butter of the franchise, even after the street racing aspect was phased out.
      • Even more so when you consider how many times Walker's character has managed to escape or, at the very least, come away uninjured from some pretty serious accidents and explosions in the movies.
      • Eerily enough, TNT broadcast The Fast and the Furious on the day it was announced Paul Walker was killed. No, it wasn't a tribute. The broadcast was scheduled weeks in advance.
      • Him dying on a Porsche when Brian and gang usually drive similar luxury cars is also unsettling.
      • A scene from Fast and Furious 7, leaked just a few hours before Paul's death had Brian and Roman attending Han's funeral. Roman says that he doesn't want any more funerals, where Brian says that there will be 'just one more'. In the context of the situation, the character was referring to the film's villain, yet it is still very chilling, especially with such a small time gap between the scene being leaked and the actor's untimely death.
      • Dom explaining his father's death in the first movie. The description is eerily similar to how Walker's fatal accident played out.
    • Han's fate in Tokyo Drift comes off as this considering that in Fast Five, a joke is made with his name when the passports the crew used to enter Brazil are briefly seen onscreen and Han's reads "Han Seoul-Oh", and years later in an unrelated movie, the character from whom said name is derived also died.
    • Ronda Rousey's fight scene in Furious 7 was carefully written not to make her look bad, as she was at the time the UFC Women Bantamweight Champion, the most popular female MMA fighter in the world and even a potential WWE debutant. Mere months after the release of the film, she lost her championship to Holly Holm and her career never recovered.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Fast 5 being the entry which saw the franchise undergo a Genre Shift from street racing to heist movie, when you remember that The Brazillian Job, the sequel to the The Italian Job remake that was stuck in Development Hell for years, was going to be set in Brazil. Further compounded by the fact The Italian Job had a Market Based Stock Subtitle of "L.A. Heist" & Fast 5 had the Market-Based Title "Rio Heist" which led people to believe that the screenplay used for Fast 5 was in fact the same script for The Brazillian Job reworked to fit the franchise.
    • The Italian Job connections became even funnier when F. Gary Gray, the director of the remake, was announced to be the director of Fast 8, which would also reunite two of that film's stars, Jason Statham and Charlize Theron.
    • The cable guns in the sixth movie are surprisingly similar to the grappling hook in Just Cause 2 in the way tethering one vehicle to another creates over-the-top physics-related havoc.
    • The Fast And The Furious: Drift (released around the same time as Tokyo Drift) arcade game allows you to customize numerous cars with various parts including neon lights. Among the cars that can be customized are the Ford GT and '67 Mustang Fastback. Five years later came Fast Five. Hobbs' crew recovers a Ford GT40 (a contemporary of the Mustang Fastback and the inspiration for the Ford GT) with an aftermarket stereo system. He mocks the stereo in the classic car saying "Might as well put neons on it."
    • One year before Ludacris joined the cast in 2 Fast 2 Furious, he released the memetic hard-driving theme song, "Move Bitch", still his most famous song to date. He may have been cast because of this.
    • CinemaSins poked at the apparent overlap with The Expendables franchise with the introduction of Jason Statham. Now #7 one-upped them by adding Ronda Rousey!
    • In-universe example. In the ending montage of Fast Five, Roman and Tej got a hold of two Koenigsegg CCXRs, very rare sports cars with only four units built. Roman said that he got his from making a deal with a sheikh in Abu Dhabi. Comes Furious 7, the crew actually got to visit Abu Dhabi and infiltrated an Arabian prince's party and ended up stealing a Lykan Hypersport, itself also a very rare sports car with only 7 units produced.
    • In Furious 6, various characters over the course of the film refer to Hobbs as different members of The Avengers. Come 2014, and Hobbs' actor has been cast in a superhero film, just not a Marvel one.
      • This also has the knock-on effect of making the Dom/Hobbs fight from Fast Five into a Marvel vs. DC brawl, with Diesel voicing Groot in Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy. Who can force them to work together after this? Why, Ego the Living Planet of course!
    • There are news of a possible remake of Big Trouble in Little China with Dwayne Johnson as Jack Burton... who was originally played by Kurt Russell, who appears in Furious 7 alongside Johnson. We have the two Jack Burtons on the same movie now!
  • Homegrown Hero: Fast Five is set entirely in Brazil, is almost exclusively a clash of American gangsters and American cops - both sides have exactly one important non-American character in their midst.
  • Ho Yay: Has its own page.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient: The first trailer for the 8th film. Notably Dom's (apparent) Face–Heel Turn, the team's Enemy Mine with Shaw, the submarine, and the finale of Cipher kissing Dom in front of Letty.
  • Inferred Holocaust: A lot of the cars that Cipher hacks and uses as remote controlled battering rams in New York City had people in them.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks: As the franchise became more critically and commercially successful, it moved away from car culture and street-racing to heist-movies and spy thrillers, leaving a very vocal portion of the fanbase unhappy, believing that the cars and street-racing were the initial draw.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: A lot of people saw Furious 7 simply to see how Paul Walker's role and sendoff would be handled.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Dom turning evil in the 8th film, The Fate of the Furious. Several fans are already guessing that there's more to it than meets the eye and doubt that Dom becoming a villain will actually last. If anything, it's probably to cover both the reason why he joins forces with the villain, due to him having a son being held hostage, and the fact that the Shaw brothers pull off a Heel–Face Turn and are accepted into the team, as the actual film makes it clear from the very beginning that Dom is working with Cipher against his will.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Owen Shaw in the sixth movie is a borderline deconstruction of this. He has most of the traits: he's intelligent and manipulates the good guys to his own ends, he has a backup plan in case he gets captured, he ruthlessly pursues his goal, and he's smart enough to put his backup plan into motion before he gets captured, just in case. What he lacks, however, is charisma. To him, other people are nothing but tools, and he says as much to his own team. Instead of being admirable, this trait makes him cold and sadistic, preventing him from falling into this trope. And it eventually gets him paralyzed when Letty turns on him and aids Dom's team in stopping him.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • I'M IN YOUR FACE.
    • Everytime Vin Diesel uses the word "Family" or educating other characters about The Bro Code.
    • Daddy's gotta go to work.
    • "See You Again" has already become a staple song for memorializing someone who has passed away much in the vein of "Amazing Grace" or "I'll Be Missing You". For example, it was used in a meme paying tribute to Glenn Rhee on The Walking Dead when it appeared he had died in Season 6, or more comically, in at least one Vine memorializing Harambe the gorilla in summer 2016.
    • The laughably stupid title of 2 Fast 2 Furious had made 2 X 2 Y into a title meme, with X and Y being whatever one wants.
    • Jah's quote in 6, "Hantam mereka," (roughly translated to "Hit them (with your car)" or "Do them in") is this among Indonesian audiences.
    • Playing the Tokyo Drift theme song when anything remotely resembling a drift is on screen.
  • Moral Event Horizon: In Fate, if Cipher didn't cross this by threatening to kill Dom's son, she certainly crosses it by ordering Rhodes to kill Elena.
  • My Real Daddy: While the original movie was directed by Rob Cohen and the early films were written by Gary Scott Thompson, most people credit director Justin Lin (with James Wan also receiving some credit as of the seventh film) and writer Chris Morgan for really bringing the franchise to the heights its known for today.
  • Narm:
    • Some stunts in the sixth movie are hilariously over the top, even for this franchise. It's hard to hold laughter when Dom crashes his car on the one side of the bridge so he can propel himself into the air to catch Letty, who just fell from the tank that flipped over. Not only Dom grabs Letty in mid-air but manages to change her trajectory so they both land on some car that just happened to be there. Of course neither of them are hurt.
    • Alot of the dialogue in the second movie during the first race between the drivers, especially Suki's.
    • In 7, an emotionally-charged climactic scene is somewhat marred by the reveal in a flashback that Dom wore his standard white wifebeater shirt during his wedding ceremony with Letty (who is dressed up nicely).
    • Ronda Rousey might get a badass fighting scene in the film, but many agree that when it came for her to say actual dialogue and act that she had a bad case of Dull Surprise.
    • The airport at the end of 6. Just how long has the damn landing track to be to allow for such a long battle while taking off?
    • Vin Diesel's constant turning around in a badass way can get silly after a while.
    • The title of the 8th installment is The Fate of the Furious. It's physically impossible to think of Saber jousting on a motorcycle or Fate Testarossa driving an actual Ferrari Testarossa.
    • Jason Statham's antics while rescuing Brian Toretto in the 8th film. Endearing as they might be, they produce a good dose of Mood Whiplash and never stop feeling like an extended Out-of-Character Moment.
  • Narm Charm: At times, the series can be so utterly ridiculous that it's hard not to enjoy it. Case in point: during the climax of 7, Hobbs is laid up in the hospital in a cast, but decides to leave to help the crew. He breaks off the cast by flexing his muscles, complete with a one-liner to his daughter. "Daddy's gotta go to work."
  • Nightmare Fuel:
  • In 2 Fast 2 Furious, a guy in a red Mustang trying out to be a henchman for Verone's operation gets crushed under an semi-truck and then the car chassis causes a grey Corvette to crash; and it was a total accident that came out of nowhere. Imagine how much thist thing happens in a universe like this...
    • The scene where Verone has a corrupt cop give him a 15-minute window for the movement of his money by torturing him by heating up a metal bucket with a live rat that will borrow into the cop's body if the bucket is heated long enough; thank God, it doesn't happen, but Verone threatens to do that to his family if he doesn't.
    • From Fate, a limo containing a Russian diplomat speeds around a corner, followed by hundreds of remotely-controlled cars, clogging the streets of New York like a flood.
    • From the same film, Cipher's monologue about her motivations to steal the Russian nuclear football, comparing herself to "the crocodile by the watering hole."
  • One-Scene Wonder
    • The shotgun-toting truck driver in the first film who successfully fights off the gang.
    • Jason Statham's appearance during the post credits in the sixth film.
  • Padding: Most of the scenes in between car chases/races, especially in the early films, do nothing to advance the plot and could easily be removed without affecting the story.
  • Rule of Sean Connery: The series started attracting considerable praise the same time The Rock was added to the cast. Jason Statham and Kurt Russell added some more come the seventh movie and again with the additions of Charlize Theron and Helen Mirren in the eighth.
  • Sequelitis: 2 Fast 2 Furious is widely regarded to be the worst film in the series by some distance, and often consigned to Fanon Discontinuity status by fans. Tokyo Drift, while not nearly as hated as the previous film, tends to be seen as the most forgettable entry in the series.
  • Signature Song: Wiz Khalifa's "See You Again" is far and away the most popular and most successful song to have ever been featured in the series. For the Gaiden Movie Tokyo Drift, the titular song by the Teriyaki Boyz is arguably a close second.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: The later films have been compared as a throwback to over the top action movies of the 80s to the point that it could be considered as a better Expendables movie than the actual Expendables movie. The car stunts and chases have also been compared to the Grand Theft Auto series.
  • Special Effect Failure: It's pretty obvious in the first four films when CGI is used for the cars. The fifth and sixth films are much less obvious about it.
    • The best (worst?) examples of this are the race at the beginning of 2Fast 2Furious and the tanker heist in the fourth film.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Deckard Shaw, played by a certified badass Jason Statham in his most Playing Against Type role yet, seems to be kind of a let down in the seventh movie. Yes, he has his badassery moments like tearing down half of a hospital just to see his brother, injuring Hobbs and killing Han and making it to look like an accident, all before going after Dom's crew. But after Mose Jakande, the movie's other Big Bad shows up, he gets sidelined into showing up for a couple scenes during each conflict Dom's crew got themselves into, and the last act ultimately turns out to be mainly about Jakande's mercenaries, with Deckard just going after Dom and him alone without caring that his other friends are also equally responsible for crippling his brother. Sure, he gets his chance to shine in the movie, but after all that build up in the trailers as the ultimate badass out for Dom's crew's blood, seeing him got sidelined by Jakande, who doesn't even show up in any trailer, may put off some viewers. At least at the end of the movie Deckard is still alive, while Jakande isn't, paving the way for him and his brother to return in the sequel and even redeem themselves.
    • Cipher is played by Charlize Theron who is on a roll as an action hero. The trailers show her in full military gear. She spends the entire movie pressing buttons on her undetectable plane and never participates directly in the action at any point.
    • Hobbs rides the line on this trope in 7, going somewhat Out of Focus for a large chunk of the film. His contributions are still awesome and vital enough to justify his high billing, though.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: 7 would have been the perfect time to tie Better Luck Tomorrow into the main series and strengthen Tokyo Drift's connection to the rest of the series, but the events of Tokyo Drift barely get a mention and nothing in Better Luck Tomorrow is referenced. This might be accounted for by two changes in direction: Justin Lin not being on board, and of course, Paul.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Would it be tasteless to say that the CGI doubles for the late Paul Walker in Furious 7 are actually quite good?
  • Vindicated by History: Somewhat with 2 Fast 2 Furious. Though still considered a weak entry, its reputation has grown a bit over a few years mostly because of the tragic death of Paul Walker. It has caused some fans to look back at it a bit more fondly than when it was first released. Not to mention, many find it as a great intro for Roman who has become a big part in the franchise.


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