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Trick Bomb
Conventionally, bombs are associated with Stuff Blowing Up, but then there are special ones with different effects.

Types include Smoke Bombs, Knock Out Bombs, Sticky Bombs, Stink Bombs, and Phlebotinum Bomb.

Some Real Life examples include flashbangs, stinger grenades, fireworks (explode into pretty), and the aforementioned smoke grenades. Then there are the infrared-emitting hot-smoke grenades used for targeting IR-sensitive missiles. Or baffling them, it all depends.

Compare and Contrast with some Booby Traps. See also Grenade Tag.

Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • Fullmetal Alchemist: Lan Fan and Fuu use a variety of trick bombs, including flash and tear.
  • Bleach: Ganju Shiba manages to defeat Yumichika, a high ranked soul reaper using various bombs and fireworks.
  • Tower of God: Ja Wangnan uses a variety of bombs (which look like pokéballs), including Shinsoo Bombs, regular grenades and smoke-pepper bombs.
  • Btooom!

Comic Books
  • In the 1988-89 DC Comics Invasion crossover, a member of the alien Dominator species develops and detonates a "gene bomb" which targets those with the "metahuman" gene (responsible for the emergence of Earthling superheroes) and causes them to lose control of their powers. For some, it eventually proves lethal.
    • The Invasion example (along with Invasion itself) was parodied in an issue of X-Men, with a Jean Bomb that destroyed relationships. Guess whom it resembled?
  • Batman and Robin use these.
    • Similarly, The Joker occasionally uses bombs that harmlessly distribute scraps of paper with "BOOM!" written on them. They are externally indistinguishable from his bombs that actually kill people.
  • Lobo used a "guilt grenade" against The Mask since it was the only way for Lobo to defeat an otherwise "cartoon-invulnerable" opponent.
  • The Super Mario Bros.. comic had a story called "Duh Stoopid Bomb!" The bomb would temporarily turn anyone in the blast radius into an idiot.
    • They also had the Smart Bombs that were meant to counteract the effects of Duh Stoopid Bomb.

Film — Live Action

Literature
  • Discworld: Scent bombs are used as a routine countermeasure now that it is generally known that the Ankh-Morpork city watch has a werewolf on staff.
  • Matthew Reilly: flashers and tear gas grenades are fairly reasonable, but he also uses liquid nitrogen grenades and anti-firearm grenades. That's right, a bomb that takes out firearms by filling the air with sticky confetti that gets into the parts of a gun and stops it firing a second time.
  • The hero of Hornet Flight gives the British the schematics of a new German radar system, allowing them to use trick chaff bombs to mess with the Germans, making them believe there is a tremendous wave of enemy airplanes coming to attack them.
  • In Starship Troopers, Johnny Rico uses a device that shouts "I'm a thirty second bomb! I'm a thirty second bomb! Twenty-nine! Twenty-eight! ..." in the Skinny language to clear out one of their command bunkers.
    • The vocal countdown is designed to create mayhem, but this also counts as a subversion, because the bomb is an actual explosive, blowing up when it reaches the end of the countdown.
  • The Star Wars Expanded Universe mentions grenades such as CryoBan (freezes stuff), "goop" (fast-setting glue, used to entangle rioters) Bothan stun spores (causes disorientation and nausea) and thermal detonators (create Spheres Of Destruction).
  • The Stainless Steel Rat loves nonlethal gas bombs, including blackout-gas (temporary blindness), knockout gas, lachrymose and regurgitant (He once said of the latter "The IIER had made me throw up often enough and I wanted to return the favor".)
  • In The Machiavelli Interface, Emile Khadaji supplies a number of rebel groups with nonlethal weapons, including vomit- and diarrhea-inducing gas bombs.

Live-Action TV
  • There was a Propaganda Bomb in an early episode of Mash. A friendly fire bomb landed at the unit, and didn't explode. Hawkeye and his friends tried to disarm it but that just set it off, which is when they discovered it was only leaflets. The propaganda read:
    Give yourselves up. You can't win.
  • The Goodies once visited a U.S. Airforce base, where they were shown a large variety of trick bombs, including tear gas, laughing gas, sleeping gas, and clown gas.
    "This is the worst one."
    "What does it do?"
    "It blows their heads off."

Real Life
  • Airborne Leaflet Propaganda, often used during World War II.
  • Bombs filled with chaff (metal strips used to confuse radar).
  • Any nuclear missile can be turned into a trick bomb of massive proportions when detonating it high in the atmosphere. All nuclear explosions create an electromagnetic pulse, which can damage nearby electronic equipment, which usually isn't that much of a problem when compared to the detonation itself. But when it goes off high in the atmosphere, the earth's magnetic field amplifies the effect, and could knock out entire countries or continents with a massive EMP blast.
    • Likewise, most fears regarding nuclear terrorism aren't of terrorists acquiring a conventional nuclear device, so much as what is frequently called a "dirty bomb". Conventional explosives wired to a radioactive source, such as the plutonium core of a conventional nuclear explosive. The initial explosion is comparatively small, but the real danger lies in the highly radioactive material that gets spread around, like the fallout of a nuclear weapon without the city-destroying blast. It can affect miles of land and leave it radioactive for decades, depending on the yield.
  • Stun, Incendiary, and Smoke Grenades.
  • Stinger Grenades, which scatter dozens of little rubber balls upon detonation to stun and possibly incapacitate anyone caught in it's range.
  • Tear gas grenades.
  • Airsoft grenades are devices with a small explosive charge that shoots BBs around like the shrapnel of a real grenade. They can still be harmful if held, and throwing an Airsoft grenade back is considered both very dangerous and poor showing.
  • Early fire extinguishers were more or less glass orbs shaped like grenades, filled with a fire-suppressing liquid. Since they were first produced in the pre-electric days, the most likely source of a fire was a stove or a fireplace, which they were intended to be thrown into like a grenade. By all accounts, they were quite unreliable, and started to get replaced with compressed water and later compressed foam or gas fire extinguishers at around the end of the 19th century.

Tabletop Games
  • The closest thing Dungeons & Dragons has to a standard grenade is alchemist's fire, a liquid stored in throwable bottles that ignites on exposure to oxygen. From there things get a little weird. Bottles of holy water can be thrown to do damage to undead, acid flasks ... do acid damage, tanglefoot bags release an adhesive to slow opponents down, choking powder makes it hard to breathe, and thunderstones deafen the subject. The catchall term for these is "grenadelike weapons". Alchemist's fire and acid flasks are particularly useful in low-level parties for finishing off trolls, which will eventually regenerate from wounds inflicted by any other type of damage.
  • Warhammer 40,000 has a number of special grenade types available to different species. These run from relatively "normal" grenades such as smoke and stun grenades right the way up really exotic things such as Stasis Grenades (which stop time in a small area) and Warp Grenades (which tear a hole in the fabric of reality and suck anything nearby into the Warp).
  • The Alchemist class in Pathfinder can eventually learn to use a whole bunch of these, including smoke bombs, stink bombs, poison gas bombs, frost bombs, two different varieties of incendiary bombs, and even holy bombs.

Video Games
  • Any shooter with smoke/flash/stun grenades counts.
  • The Bowser Bomb in Mario Party 2 explodes... and turns the tiny Baby Bowser into a full-sized Bowser.
  • Borderlands: Certain grenade mods qualify. They can range from the mundane (cluster bombs, mines, Sticky Bomb), to the weird (ones which fly into the air and blast massive amounts of a given element on anything below, teleporting grenades) to the completely insane (grenades which release particles which smash into enemies then return to you to restore health).
  • Transformers: War for Cybertron has grenades that heal.
  • Flashbangs are normally used to disorient people but when Alan Wake uses them, they either One-Hit Kill the normal Taken and possessed objects, or deplete the stronger Taken's shadows to take 'em down.
  • Super Smash Bros. Brawl has Sticky Bombs, smoke bombs, and "smart bombs" (bombs that inexplicably explode slowly).
  • In Dragon Age: Origins the grenades simply did area damage, but a spell called the Spirit Bomb turns NPC's into potential explosives that can also infect others.
  • Dragon Age II presents a wider variety, with bombs that slow, stun and damage, or even revive fallen party members. A few rogue-specific skills are named and defined as bombs, a few more a labeled with a bomb icon and exhibit the same grenade range and visual effects.
  • In Hogs Of War, pigs promoted into the Medic class-line gain access to a Medicine Ball, which functions exactly like a grenade but releases pink healing gas instead of fiery explosive death. Espionage pigs also get a 'poison gas' grenade, which is pretty much Exactly What It Says on the Tin.
  • Team Fortress Classic had several cool grenades, unique to the classes, as well as the standard frag grenades that almost every class got:
    • Heavy and Demoman: MIRV grenades. After it explodes, doing the damage of a standard frag, it disperses smaller grenades that proceed to detonate themselves for massive damage. Probably the strongest grenade in the game.
    • Soldier: Nail grenades. When thrown, it'll hover up and start shooting nails in all directions. Ideal for taking out sentries or holding a choke point.
    • Pyro: Napalm grenades. Similar to the MIRV grenade in principle, but instead of doing direct explosive damage (which only the initial explosion does), it scatters several small napalm fragments that light people on fire for damage over time. Useful for area denial and, in Fortress Forever, stacking multiple flame weapons for extra damage.
    • Medic: Concussion grenades. No damage, but they cause the enemy to be stunned for a few seconds and mess up their arm and interface for a few seconds more, but they're most useful for "conc-jumping", since they propel the user MASSIVE lengths (without bringing them so high that they get fall damage) when primed and held until detonation.
    • Spy: Gas grenades. They do a tiny bit of damage, but more importantly they actual cause the target to hallucinate, seeing explosions, grenades, and enemies that aren't there. Quite amusing, actually.
    • Scout: Caltrops. It doesn't explode, but when thrown it'll release a bunch of caltrops that slow down and damage whoever steps on them. Useful for stopping pursuers. He also has the distinction of not getting frag grenades; instead, he gets the same concussion grenades that the Medic does, mostly for conc-jumping.
    • Engineer: EMP grenades. Can potentially have the highest damage of all grenades in the game; throwing one causes whoever is hit by it to have all their ammo detonated at once, including shotgun shells and rockets. Damage spends on class; if thrown at a Scout, who only carries a few shotgun shells, it'll do next to no damage. If thrown at a Soldier, who carries a bucket load of shotgun shells for his Super Shotgun and a bunch of rockets for his Rocket Launcher, it'll be a One-Hit Kill.
    • The only one who don't get unique grenades is the Sniper, but like the other classes (except the Scout), he does get standard frag grenades.
  • Bomberman in general came to love this trope as the series progressed. The original series had remote bombs that were detonated manually instead of on a fuse, rubber bombs that bounced around when kicked or thrown, and spiked "piercing bombs" that blew right through every block in their blast range. Later games added elemental wind, water, electric, ice, and light bombs, turning normal bombs into fire-elemental ones. Still other games have included bait bombs, pile bombs, barrier bombs, salt bombs (for killing slugs and nothing else), bombs which curved left, right, or towards enemies when thrown, poison bombs, radio-controlled bombs, speed bombs, power bombs, dangerous bombs (which act like small nukes), and many more.
  • Mega Man has copied such weapons before. These have included the Crash Bomber, Drill Bomb, Napalm Bomb, Ballade Cracker, Bubble Bomb, Danger Wrap, Flash Bomb, Remote Mine, Black Hole Bomb, Commando Bomb, and the Mine Sweeper. His little brother, Mega Man X, has likewise wielded trick bombs like the Magnet Mine, Parasitic Bomb, Bomb Bee, and the Squeeze Bomb.
  • Assassin's Creed: Revelations: Coin, Caltrops, cherry, splinter, stink, smoke, and blood bombs.
  • Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City: Pheromone Bombs attract zombies and B.O.W.S. to it.
    • Resident Evil 4 uses flashbangs in the same manner as Alan Wake above - any exposed Plagas parasites within a certain range of the flashbang's explosion die instantly.
    • Resident Evil: Revelations has "B.O.W Decoy" grenades, which are grenades that emit a sound that attracts monsters to it before it explodes (that sounds familiar), "Shock Grenades" that explode in powerful electrical blasts and "Pulse Grenades" that emit blasts of sound that stun enemies on land and kill them underwater.
  • In Mass Effect 1, the grenades can be modded to be incendiary grenades, concussion grenades, chemical grenades, flashbangs, and radioactive grenades. In Mass Effect 2, grenades were a much smaller part of gameplay, only available as DLC powers in the form of flashbang grenades and incendiary grenades.
    • Mass Effect 3 adds more Trick Bomb varieties; in addition to standard frag grenades, there are inferno grenades, biotic lift grenades, cluster grenades and sticky grenades. Also, unlike the last game, the only grenade launcher in the game (the M-37 Falcon) is classified as an assault rifle rather than a heavy weapon. Meaning it can be armed with Incendiary Ammo, Warp Ammo, Disruptor Ammo, Cryo Ammo, and Armor Piercing Ammo. So in addition to it being able to launch an infinite supply of incendiary grenades and biotic grenades due to using thermal clips, it can also launch grenades that electrocute people (disruptor) and grenades that snap-freeze targets (cryo).
  • The Witcher contains five different types of bombs, manufactured using alchemy just like potions and blade coatings. The only one that acts even remotely like a traditional explosive is Dragon's Dream (releases a cloud of flammable gas that Geralt can detonate with the Igni sign). The other four bombs produce poison, evoke fear, stun, and blind, respectively.
    • The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings adds a fragmentation bomb, an incendiary bomb, one that releases noxious gas, a light bomb (illuminates the area), and a psychoactive gas bomb.
  • Binary Domain features a number of different types of grenades apart from standard frags, including sticky and remote-detonated varieties. Of special note are the chaff grenades; rather than confusing radar, they confuse enemies (all of whom are robots) into attacking each other.
  • Tribes: Ascend has unique explosives for all of its nine classes. Perhaps the most notable is the Brute's Fractal Grenade, which levitates in the air for a few seconds after it hits the ground, firing powerful lasers that ricochet off walls in every direction.
    • Also of note is the Pathfinder's Impact Nitron grenade, which does some damage but is mostly used because it knocks enemies back and forces them to drop the flag if they're carrying it.
  • Deep Fear has this as one of the ways to restore the Oxygen Meter: John Mayor can throw an "air grenade" in order to quickly fill the room with breathable oxygen without having to visit a Save Point. One puzzle also requires Mayor to throw a "fire extinguisher capsule" in order to put out the flames blocking his progress.
  • Various Star Wars Expanded Universe games feature some pretty strange explosives. Knights of the Old Republic features several of the more esoteric variants above and beyond the basic fragmentation and stun grenades, including sonic grenades, plasma grenades, cryoban grenades, ion grenades, poison grenades, adhesive grenades, and thermal detonators. Notable for allowing the player to throw all of these at the same target for maximum tricks and fun.
  • The Halo series has normal grenades used by space marines, while Covenant forces use sticky plasma grenades. Later games in the series include sticky shrapnel grenades, napalm grenades, and grenades that project an aura that rapidly drains shields.
  • Left 4 Dead has the pipe bomb, an explosive canister with a fire alarm attached to it that attracts Infected to it before exploding and killing them all. Left 4 Dead 2 adds the bile bomb, a canister filled with Boomer bile that can be tossed at specific Infected to get common ones to chase after and attack it.

Web Comics
  • The H-Bomb in Life With Lamarr is packed with Triple-H Hash which will cause all living things in the blast radius to become permanently stoned and anyone with 500 kilometres of the epicenter to get serious munchies.

Web Original

Western Animation
  • Static Shock: Richie made a shock bomb that Static could use if he ran out of juice, and a net bomb that shot a net out when it hit something. When he came into his own intelligence superpowers and became Gear, he came up with others, such as quick-cement bombs.
  • Stunt Dawgs: The Weapon of Choice.
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender had smoke, slime, and stink bombs in addition to the usual exploding type. And some that explode and stink.
  • Filmation's Ghostbusters had "Zombie Bombs," which could turn people nearby into zombies when detonated. Scarechrome tried to use one against the Ghostbusters, but he caught his peg-leg in a small hole on the deck. Its only use was to set up Prime Evil's immortal line, "Did anyone ever tell you that you drive like a zombie?"

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