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Appearance Is in the Eye of the Beholder
Some characters Lie to the Beholder, appearing selectively different to one or two people than they appear to anyone else.

Other characters appear differently to anybody who sees them. One man will view them as a tall blonde woman, where another will see a short black man. Obviously, this makes tracking the character down by description difficult. Such an ability is almost always mystical in nature, although scientific or pseudoscientific explanations like "psychic resonance" or "nanotechnology" are often used in science-fiction settings. Keep in mind that when Appearance Is In The Eye of The Beholder, that means that the entity involved looks different to multiple people at the same time.

A common variant of this in settings with multiple species is to have an entity which appears different depending on the species of the beholder, most often as a member of the same species.

A Form You Are Comfortable With and You Cannot Grasp the True Form are often forms of this. Compare Lie to the Beholder, which generally causes the same illusion to all affected viewers. Compare an Empathic Shapeshifter, who physically changes, while this trope is more often an illusion. Often employed by a Master of Illusion.

Examples

Anime
  • The Truth in Fullmetal Alchemist takes the form of a silhouette of the one talking to it, because what everyone is actually seeing is their personal "truth" connecting them to all other life in the world.
  • In Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei, Kafuka Fuura only appears in front of those who she had gave up her organs to. Other people will only see the host bodies she possesses at the time, which are basically almost the entirety of the class 2-He and the same people she had gave up her organs to.

Comic Books
  • This is why Galactus looks to us humans like a human with a funny hat and the letter G on his belt buckle. To the Stone Men from Saturn he looks like a Stone Man, to Toad Men he looks like a Toad Man, etc.
  • Thanks to Word of God, this could describe how in Calvin and Hobbes, Calvin sees Hobbes differently from everyone else.
  • This is explicitly shown several times in The Sandman, where Morpheus (as his name implies) always appears like a member of the observer's own species and culture, or like what the observer would expect the God of Dreams to resemble.
  • One Justice League of America story featuring Hal Jordan as The Spectre had this applying to Hal, making it hard to convince the Justice League that he was who he said he was.

Literature
  • In Stephen King's IT, when the heroes go to the villain's lair, the sign above the door of the lair is like this: each character sees it differently.
  • In the Doctor Who New Adventures novel Sky Pirates! the Doctor himself was heavily implied to be one of these.
  • In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, each character is asked to see the Wizard one at a time, appearing as something different to each one. It's all a trick, however; the real "wizard" is The Man Behind the Curtain.
  • There's an interesting variation in the Dragaera series: the goddess Verra is not described as appearing differently to everyone who beholds her, but it becomes clear that when she speaks, everyone hears something different, effectively holding multiple different conversations simultaneously. Descriptions of godhood elsewhere in the series imply that this is a result of one of the defining characteristics of deities and demons in the Dragaera-verse.
  • In The End of Mr. Y, everything in the Troposphere is dependant on the eye of the beholder.
  • In The Well of Lost Plots, the Grand Panjandarum resembles the beholder when they appear at the end of the book.
  • In Percy Jacksonandthe Olympians and its sequel series Heroesof Olympus Aphrodite's appearance is not only different for each person who sees her, but her appearence will change while they are looking at her to better reflect the individual's idea of ideal beauty.
  • In the Young Wizards series the Powers That Be can manifest in multiple ways. In one particular form of manifestationnote  they look different to every mortal who sees them. The main character perceives the Lone Power to be a handsome faced man with red hair, and the Archangel Michael to be a glowing seven foot tall woman wearing sweats and sneakers.
  • In the Nightside books, the succubus Pretty Poison looks like whatever you find most attractive.

Live-Action TV
  • Angel: The second Conduit. It reverts to Gunn's shape after Gunn unknowingly arranges the death of Fred.
  • In Babylon 5, the character Kosh (once outside of his encounter suit) appears to a member of any given starfaring race as that race's version of an "angel"—except to Londo. To him, he's invisible.
  • The maid in the first season of American Horror Story appeared young and beautiful to the husband, but middle-aged to the wife.
  • Pleasure GELFs in Red Dwarf can appear to any onlooker as their perfect mate, despite looking like disgusting green blobs in their natural form.
    • Also Psirens, whose true form was some sort of giant beetle thing.
  • Star Trek: The Original Series episode "The Man Trap". Early in the episode the salt vampire made itself appear differently to three different people simultaneously. It looked like a young Nancy Crater to McCoy, an older Nancy Crater to Kirk, and to crewman Darnell it was a young blonde woman who looked nothing like Nancy Crater. Later in the episode it changed methods, appearing to all comers as an older Nancy Crater, and making use of a different Trope.
  • The Humanoid Abomination known as the Shape in Sapphire And Steel supposedly looks different to anyone who looks at him, although they could only afford two actors. When he's seen in any shot which isn't supposedly from another character's point of view, he's The Blank.

Tabletop Games
  • Any member of the Romancer Kith from Changeling: The Lost always appears as the beholder's perfect ideal of beauty.
  • The monstrous dream larva in Dungeons & Dragons uses this ability to be every one of its enemies' worst nightmares at once.
    • 3.5 had a spell called "Reflective Disguise" which caused anyone looking at you to think you were a member of the same race. A potential downside was that you looked like the same gender as well, which could easily lead to Pronoun Trouble.
  • The Obfuscate Discipline power "The Familiar Stranger" from Vampire: The Requiem has an effect somewhere between this and The Nondescript.
  • Members of the demonic race of gilmyne in Exalted appear to all viewers as members of their own species - a human would see a gilmyne as a human, an elemental would see it as an elemental, etc.

Video Games
  • This is used as a handwave in the bonus chapter of The World Ends with You, explaining why a character who logically should look different in this timeline still has the same appearance—Neku knows the character one way, and is incapable of perceiving otherwise. (When he challenges this, the real explanation breaks the fourth wall: why bother making a new appearance for a character who will only show up once?)
  • Shin Megami Tensei: Implied to be the case with Lucifer. His avatars' variance from game to game might seem like either Shapeshifting or Depending on the Artist. However, he casually tells Raidou that the Mushibito call him "Beelzeboo" because they see him as a fly. Note that he rarely appears in person with more than one person watching and the player presumably shares the main character's POV...
  • In Kingdom Hearts: 358/2 Days, this is The Reveal for Xion. Her appearance depends on who sees her. Roxas, Axel, Riku, and a few others see her as Kairi with black hair. Xigbar sees her as Ventus. Xemnas sees her as Sora. Saix sees her as a faceless puppet, which is part of the reason why he calls her "it" and can't understand why Axel cares about her.

Webcomics
  • The Kevin & Kell version of the story of Jesus' birth has the baby Jesus seen as being the same species of whoever looks at him.
  • In El Goonish Shive, Tedd's dad leaves his son a note on their refrigerator, but his handwriting is so inscrutable that only he can read the original message. To everyone else, the note opens, "Dear Tedd," and then imparts a message the reader needed to hear. This is never explained.
  • The Realm of the Dead in Gunnerkrigg Court appears different to everyone. For Antimony and Mort, it appears (or so we're told) to be a majestic underworld, filled with enormous libraries, labyrinthine mazes, and enormous creatures of glory. For Kat, the devoted skeptic - as well as the audience - it appears to be nothing more than a cheap haunted house run by guys in dollar-store costumes.
    • The last page of that chapter shows that what looked like pasty guy in plastic green monster gloves to Kat looked, to the others, like this...thing.
    • The next chapter is from Mort's and Antimony's perspectives. Curiously, even though they both seemed to be seeing the same things in the previous chapter, Mort's "case worker" looked like a guy wearing a cheesy vampire costume (possibly because we see it much earlier, moments after his death), while to Antimony it's a hideous emaciated vampire, mouth drenched in gore.

Web Original
  • The Slender Man had this effect in the earliest stories. These days, he's more often depicted as The Blank.
  • A video from College Humor features an "Optical Illusion Girlfriend" who looks like a pretty girl to her boyfriend but an ugly hag to his friend. After an argument with his friend over her ambiguous driver license picture and them both trying to explain to each other just what they see in it, the boyfriend's perspective of her suddenly switches to the "ugly hag" and he flees in horror whereas his friend begins seeing the "pretty girl" instead and approaches her with a leer.
  • The Glow Cloud appears in different colors to all who see it in Welcome to Night Vale. Also, some Fanon interpretations of Cecil feature him as a different person to whomever looks at him.
  • Tasakeru: When Zero first transforms into the God of Time, the other Outcasts each see their own respective versions of the God in his place.

Western Animation
  • The Weird Sisters of Gargoyles all take the same form at the same time, appearing as a trio of creepy little girls, old crones, aged female gargoyles, or voluptuous young 20-somethings, as befits who they are speaking to at the time, though they can still be told apart apart by hair color (blonde, black, white). The little girls are seen by the Manhattan clan, the old crones are seen by Macbeth, and the old gargoyle hags are seen by Demona. Meanwhile the 20-somethings are their preferred form, seen by the audience and other Children of Oberon as well as any characters not implied to see them differently (although humans will see them in period/job appropriate attire). Word of God has stated that only the Third Race and the audience ever see them for what they truly are.
Ancient AstronautsOtherness TropesArmless Biped
Attractive Bent SpeciesShapeshiftingAttack of the 50-Foot Whatever
Adults Dressed as ChildrenDisguise TropesAss in a Lion Skin
Apocalyptic LogisticsSpeculative Fiction TropesArbitrary Maximum Range

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