Follow TV Tropes

Following

Creator / H. Rider Haggard

Go To

Henry Rider Haggard (22 June 1856 14 May 1925), English writer of adventure stories, often set in Africa (he had spent seven years in South Africa as a young man).

His two best-known novels are King Solomon's Mines, in which a group of Englishmen, guided by the hunter Allan Quatermain, go in search of the eponymous treasure chamber; and She, in which Leo Vincey and Horace Holly are guided by a Vincey heirloom to a lost African kingdom ruled by the immortal queen Ayesha, whose subjects call her "She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed". Both have numerous prequels and sequels — including (perhaps inevitably) She and Allan, which is a prequel to both — and both have been filmed multiple times.

Works by H. Rider Haggard with their own trope page include:


H. Rider Haggard's other works include examples of:

  • Couldn't Find a Pen: In Mr Meeson's Will, a dying millionaire trapped on a desert island has his will tattooed on the back of a fellow castaway.
  • Darkest Africa
  • Death of the Hypotenuse: In Mary of Marion Isle
  • Embarrassing Tattoo: The heroine of Mr Meeson's Will has the eponymous will tattooed on her back after she and Meeson are stranded on a desert island with no writing materials. At the end of the novel, her new husband comments on what an immense sacrifice this was for a young Victorian lady, as it meant she could never be presented at court, where she would have to wear an off-the-shoulder gown.
  • Human Notepad: The heroine of Mr Meeson's Will has the eponymous will tattooed on her back after she and Meeson are stranded on a desert island with no writing materials.
  • Jungle Opera
  • Lost World: Haggard was one of the trope makers.
  • Mighty Whitey: In Montezuma's Daughter, an Englishman leads Mexican natives in their struggle against Spanish colonizers.
  • Raised by Wolves: Galazi the Wolf in Nada the Lily claims to have been raised by jackals , and everything we see in the novel bears out this claim. Rudyard Kipling acknowledged Galazi as one his inspirations for creating Mowgli in The Jungle Book.
  • Secondary Character Title: Several of Haggard's novels, such as Nada the Lily, are titled after the hero's love interest, even if she is not not the main focus of the novel.
  • Seductive Mummy: Ma-Mee from Smith and the Pharaohs.

Top