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WanderingBrowser
topic
06:59:04 PM Jun 3rd 2014
I want to ask if Teddie of Persona 4 is an example.

He's a Shadow, an entity born from the collective subconsciousness of humanity and who ordinarily exists in an alternative plane of reality. In his "true" form, he appears as a cartoony bear mascot suit, but this is just his physical avatar, and the interior of the suit is hollow. Eventually, out of sheer desire to understand humans and walk amongst them, he literally grows himself a human body inside of his suit to contain his essence. He's also a low-level Reality Warper - the Investigation Team can only leave the Shadow World inside the televisions because he chooses to conjure forth the dimensional gates they need to return to the material world.
Extraintrovert
12:58:14 AM Jun 4th 2014
Eh, probably not. There's nothing really eldritch about Shadows. And even if being a reality warper made someone qualify, he wouldn't be one any way if his power is limited to a realm he's a part of.
efay
topic
12:26:08 PM Aug 20th 2013
Can someone make a Quotes page? I don't know how.
Telcontar
moderator
01:06:37 PM Aug 20th 2013
Just go to Quotes.Humanoid Abomination and start editing.
Cider
05:43:06 PM Aug 24th 2013
Done.
MasterGhandalf
topic
02:27:59 PM Feb 23rd 2013
edited by MasterGhandalf
Okay, I'd like to talk about Padan Fain/Mordeth/Ordeith/Jeraal Mordeth/Shaisam from The Wheel of Time, who just got deleted, as I still think he belongs here (and that there's no other trope that adequately sums up his unique and horrifying nature). Here's the rundown- Fain (or at least the version of Fain who appears in most of the series) is essentially a hybrid of four entities- the original human Padan Fain, Mordeth (a deeply malevolent ghost who tried to possess Fain), the Dark One's Hound (an entity impressed into Fain by the Dark One to give him both the power and the compulsion to hunt down Rand anywhere in the world) and the nameless dark power that had corrupted Mordeth and through him caused the destruction of the city of Aridhol and filled it with the killer fog called Mashadar.

Exactly which of these forces is most dominant in Fain varies across the series (though he's a big ball of Ax-Crazy under the best of circumstances) but the unknown dark power gradually establishes itself as the most significant and Fain becomes less and less human as a result. He has powers that cannot be at all explained by the main magic system of the series (particularly over time and death), he spreads corruption in his wake wherever he goes (sometimes by being a Manipulative Bastard, mostly because merely being in his presence can make you more evil), and perhaps most telling of all, per Word of God he exists at least partially outside the Pattern (the Pattern, for those unfamiliar with the series, is basically fantasy-speak for the space-time continuum. Fain isn't part of it. The only other things in-universe that aren't part of the Pattern are gods). Oh, and he's explicitly worse than the Myrddraal, who remain on the list, and got much worse himself after that call was made.

By the last book he's no longer remotely human, though still attached to his human body; he appears to have been totally subsumed by the nameless dark power and now calls himself Shaisam, is continually surrounded by a halo of killer fog that causes anyone in the vicinity to drop dead and rise as zombies under his control, and he plans to eat The Chosen One's soul, shuck off his mortal body, and take over from the God of Evil. When he's killed, his mortal remains melt into black goo (and it's pretty heavily implied that the only reason he was killable at all was because the killer had been previously possessed by the unknown dark power and been freed from it, granting him apparent immunity to its effects).

That's Fain. He's a supernatural horror who violates the setting's usual rules, wrapped in human flesh (and just barely that, by the end). I think he fits. Anyone contest this?
Noaqiyeum
02:33:15 PM Mar 1st 2013
Now, see, if that had been what the example said I wouldn't have mistaken it for something to purge. :) I think I'd gotten the impression that it was basically a particularly nasty case of Demonic Possession by a God of Evil. (Evil beings are typically not abominations... being 'worse' than other examples is pretty meaningless.)

Go ahead and re-add him, as far as I'm concerned. Try to explicitly mention existing outside the pattern, degrading humanity, contagious corruption... and be sure to distinguish between the Dark One and the nameless dark power. I think that was part of what threw me. :)
efay
topic
08:29:59 AM Jan 8th 2013
edited by efay
We're having a problem with Trope Decay here and really need a clean-up. Most people seem to think a Humanoid Abomination is simply a really powerful supernatural being that does bad things. I think the problem is most Tropers are not familiar with the Cosmic Horror genre and the tropes that go along with it.

I think it would be very helpful if we had a clear checklist, like the one on the Cosmic Horror Story page. I propose that a supernatural character should fit at least three of the following criteria:

Most Humanoid Abominations are creations of Mythopoeia rather than traditional monsters such as vampires and demons. Which isn't to say that a vampire, demon, or other familiar foe can't fall under this trope but they still need to fit the above criteria. To sum it up, a Humanoid Abomination is not merely a powerful supernatural being. As one Troper put it succinctly, "Abominations are violations of the very fictional universes that they infect."
asiacatdogblue
topic
01:04:34 PM Jul 9th 2012
edited by asiacatdogblue
Would Animegao Kigurumi count? One can't help but see them as this. Many cosplayers fear them and shiver at their appearance, Whereas other just see them as, "Not Right, or "Plain Wrong."
ading
topic
04:58:37 AM May 10th 2012
Noaqiyeum
02:34:07 PM Mar 1st 2013
Yes. Deleted.
captainsandwich
topic
02:11:03 AM Apr 22nd 2012
do you think its possible that part of the disturbing element of this trope is the horrible things humans have done and that this monstrosity may be some manifestation (metaphorical or otherwise) of the darker parts of our history, or am i looking to deeply into this?
ading
05:01:32 AM May 10th 2012
The defining trait of this trope is their defiance of natural law, not their horrific evil. You're looking too shallowly (if that's a word) into this.
seven7star
08:01:53 PM Jul 2nd 2012
edited by seven7star
Well if you want to get technical, let's examine the below statement about narcissists and sociopaths. As far as I'm aware, most animals (especially the "higher lifeforms") will care about their offspring and members of their own herd/pack/pride/flock/etc. Primates are social creatures. Primates (including most humans) work together to build a better society. A narcissist or a sociopath is the exact opposite of this. They ignore the basical biological assumption that parents will care for their young. They view their own children as merely easily manipulated pawns and tools. In a way, this does fly in the face of natural law. So technically, with sociopaths and narcissists at least, they fit both the "horrific evil" part and "defiance of natural law." Some pschologists will even tell you that it's futile to try to understand and explain evil.
ading
04:48:11 AM Aug 12th 2012
edited by ading
^ "horrific evil" yes. "defiance of natural law" no. There are tons of animals that don't care about their children-komodo dragons, fruit flies, female Guantanamo toads, to name just a few. Also when I talk about natural law I don't actually mean they defy natural law-they probably do, but that's not necessary, nor does it automatically make them this. What I really mean when I say that is that they defy our understanding of our universe, to mind-shattering degrees. Also, an essential part of the Eldritch Abomination is their lack of interaction with humanity, which sociopaths and narcissists fail to meet.
Noaqiyeum
03:01:13 PM Mar 1st 2013
That is not how dissocial personality disorder nor narcissism work. See below.

Nor, for that matter, is it how eldritch abominations work. If you can look inside an abomination's head and describe it reasonably clearly in terms of human psychiatry, it's not an abomination.
BlueKevlar16
topic
06:40:40 AM Apr 5th 2012
For Real Life, I think Sociopaths and Malignant Narcissists count. They are always incredibly destructive to the psyches and sometimes body of anyone they can get away with abusing and generally devastate multiple; they are capable of literally any crime, no matter how heinous or unimaginably barbaric; they are incapable of feeling or understanding empathy or love; they are incapable of remorse or even understanding that their actions have consequences; they can dish out a mundane form of Mind Rape; they are more fundamentally different from every real human being than many animals because at least those animals care for their young and for other members of their herd/pack/social grouping; some psychologists even propose that the psychos account for most the evil in the world; barring nigh unheard of cases, they never ever get better; and in order to metaphorically fit the "Humanoid" part, most of them superficially charming, charismatic and glib.

Also, if we still had Troper Tales, this troper at one point got a very personal look inside the mind of a malignant narcissist. Now I understand an inkling of what a victim of an Eldritch Abomination goes through.
efay
12:19:04 PM Jan 8th 2013
You can share your story here.
Telcontar
moderator
01:15:41 PM Jan 8th 2013
Sorry, discussion pages are not for Troper Tales.
Noaqiyeum
02:55:12 PM Mar 1st 2013
edited by Noaqiyeum
Wrong. On nearly every count. Sociopathy and malignant narcissism are not just fancy psychology words for evilness, except in Hollywood Psychology.

Let's pretend for a moment that lack of empathy and remorse is the only distinguishing factor between you and a 'sociopath' - no longer used as a clinical term largely because of the abuse of its meaning. (It isn't even consistently true of all such patients with the equivalent disorders.) Such people are lacking critical components of an healthy mind. This deficiency prevents them from understanding the damage they are doing to other people because they are unable to project themselves into their victim's head.

You, on the other hand, as a person not lacking this faculty, are capable of getting into a sociopath's head, stepping into their shoes, feeling for a moment as they feel. Instead, you rank them as equivalent to unnatural nightmares from realms beyond human imagination. You have the ability to empathise with them, and you have chosen not to use it.
Voyd211
topic
02:29:20 PM Feb 26th 2012
Why does the Image Links section only include one character? I think it needs more images.
DeathCloud
topic
10:49:22 AM Apr 1st 2011
"Compare Bishonen Line, where the monster's most powerful form is humanoid" That trope is about most powerful monster form being most human-like. And humanoid does not mean most human like .
ading
04:57:06 AM May 10th 2012
Humanoid is defined as "resembling a human in body form".
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