YMMV / Hook

  • Acceptable Targets: Jack describing Peter's work as a lawyer causes Wendy to reply "Peter, you've become a pirate!" Later, when Peter tells the Lost Boys he's a lawyer, not a pirate, they still don't have any qualms about killing him and he says, "I'm not that kind of lawyer!" (Note that to them adult = pirate; they don't actually know what lawyers are but figure it must be bad too since he's an adult.) Even Peter himself tells a couple of lawyer jokes at a dinner party; "There are some things even rats won't do."
  • Accidental Innuendo: This combat banter between Hook and Peter while they are fighting Makes Sense In Context but seems rather interesting out of context:
    Peter: You know, I remember you being a lot bigger.
    Hook: To a ten year old, I'm huge.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Peter at the beginning is already dedicated to his family, he just gets overwhelmed by his many commitments. Moira's treatment of him is basically emotional abuse. On the other hand, telling your co-workers that you'll simply be unavailable for an hour or two isn't exactly hard, and Peter seems a little too willing to outright sacrifice family time for work.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Peter and the Lost Boys are more sad about their good-bye than the fact that Rufio was killed a few minutes ago! This is likely a nod to the original book where any Lost Boy that died was instantly forgotten about.
  • Anvilicious: The When You Coming Home, Dad? trope is hammered in rather heavily in the opening minutes.
  • Awesome Music: Though the film got mixed reviews, nearly everyone agreed that John Williams delivered big time with the music score. Even the music that played during the preview appeared on the soundtrack album, with some critics calling it the best material he had ever produced at that time.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: The scene in which Tinkerbell suddenly, temporarily grows to human size to remind Peter why he's in Neverland. It's even been admitted by the filmmakers to be only there because Julia Roberts demanded to have at least one scene with another actor (having to act alongside green screen for the entire film).
  • Critical Dissonance: Critics widely panned it, but audiences were more favorable, becoming a staple for folks who grew up in the 1990s.
  • Ear Worm: The pirates chanting "Hook! Hook! Show us the Hook!"
  • Ending Fatigue: There are several false starts to the Peter-Hook battle, and after that's wrapped up, as Roger Ebert put it, "Then comes the ending of the movie. Or the endings. One after another. Farewells. Poignancy. Lessons to be learned. Speeches to be made. Lost marbles to be rediscovered. Tears to be shed." And now you know why this movie is 2 hours and 24 minutes long (which, at the time, was seen as excessive for a family-oriented film).
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Rufio! Rufio! RU! FI! OOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Ooooh, that is so dangerous...
    • Even the film's detractors tend to praise Bob Hoskins' Smee.
  • Foe Yay: Towards the end, Hook asks "However did you manage to fit into those smashing tights again, Peter?"
  • Fridge Brilliance:
    • In most performances of Peter Pan, the actor who plays the children's father also plays Captain Hook. In this story, the children's father is Peter Pan.
    • A bit of brilliance that is mentioned elsewhere on This Very Wiki is the fact that when Tinkerbell first appears onscreen, she's speaking English, whereas in every other version of Peter Pan she "speaks" with a chiming noise, because only people from Neverland can understand her. However, the only person she speaks to outside of Neverland is Peter. That's the clue; for everything else Peter has forgotten about Neverland, he can still talk to faeries.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Peter's family flies to London on Pan Am... which went out of business a week before the film premiered. Pan Am would've still been on its last legs when the film was under production, so it counts. (Spielberg declared he didn't want to remove it as the sole reason for the brand inclusion was the Visual Pun regarding "Pan")
  • Genius Bonus: Those who've read J.M. Barrie's novel will notice that practically every other line/scene in the whole movie is a direct allusion and/or Mythology Gag to it.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • A great swordsman played by Dante Basco whispering "I wish I had a dad...like you" as he's killed by Hook becomes even more of a Tear Jerker to modern Prince Zuko fans. (For those who aren't familiar with the series, Zuko is a "Well Done, Son!" Guy to one of the worst dads in history.)
    • Hook's attempted suicide mixes this and Too Soon after Robin Williams' death.
    • The last line of the movie, Peter Pan's "To live ... to live would be an awfully big adventure", sounds so very sad after Mr. Williams' suicide.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Glenn Close has a cameo as a male pirate (the one that gets thrown in the "Boo Box" just before Peter first confronts Hook). Cut to 2011, when Close plays a woman masquerading as a male butler in Albert Nobbs, a role that got her nominated for a Best Actress Oscar.
    • Early in the movie, Peter is angry while on the phone because a development deal is being delayed due to endangered owls burrowing in the area, causing him to ask "Does anyone miss the Tyrannosaurus-rex!?" This is this trope for two reasons:
      • The book (and later, movie) Hoot, which is about a greedy developer wanting to build over an area where endangered owls are burrowing underground.
      • Steven Spielberg's next film would be Jurassic Park, involves people who miss the T-rex.
    • Dante Basco and Robin Williams both working on this film is nowadays interesting to see to some considering that Dante would later voice Prince Zuko in Avatar: The Last Airbender and General Iroh in The Legend of Korra and Robin's daughter Zelda Williams would later voice Kuvira in the last seasons of The Legend of Korra.
    • After this movie with its fair share of evil lawyer jokes, guess what Charlie Korsmo grew up to be?
    • "To Infinity and back again!"note 
  • Hollywood Pudgy: Peter keeps getting described as fat by the Neverland denizens (save for Thudbutt, who's the Big Fun of the Lost Boys) when he first arrives. He magically sheds a lot of it for the fight.
  • Ho Yay: Bob Hoskins said that he portrayed Smee's character as though he was in a homosexual relationship with Hook. The novelization by Terry Brooks includes a few bonus bits with Hook and Smee that don't come right out and say it, but definitely run with the idea that they're far closer than Captain and crewman.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: Many Avatar: The Last Airbender fans watch this movie just for Dante Basco. Some Band of Brothers fans actually watch it just for James Madio, despite him playing a minor character.
  • Magnificent Bastard: There's a reason the movie isn't called "Pan". Hook gets exactly what he wants; his old archenemy back in Neverland, ready for the final duel and the climactic war between the Lost Boys and the pirates. He also uses the time it takes for Peter to get his memories back to manipulate Jack into thinking he's Hook's son, scoring the ultimate revenge on Peter when he comes to save Jack and finds him standing next to Hook wearing an identical pirate outfit. And through it all, thanks to Dustin Hoffman's stellar performance, Hook manages it with humor, charisma, and style.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Ru-fi-o! Ru-fi-o! Ru! Fi! OOOOOOOOH!"
    • "BANG-A-RANG!"
    • "My Jack..."
  • The Problem with Licensed Games:
    • Played straight with the NES and Gameboy versions, but averted with the SNES, Genesis, and Sega CD ones.
    • There's also a pretty good arcade port with several playable characters, though Pan is a real Game Breaker and really the only one worth using.
    • The Monkey Island-inspired point-and-click adventure game was pretty well received.
  • Retroactive Recognition: Perconte was a Lost Boy before he joined Easy Company?
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: For some, the plot with Peter's children isn't given enough focus. Mostly because it's just one scene between Hook and Jack, and all of a sudden Jack has forgotten his father the next time we see him. The children are Out of Focus for a good portion of the film, where Peter focuses on his training and reconnecting with the Lost Boys. This might be why many viewers find Jack Unintentionally Unsympathetic, as seen below.
  • True Art Is Angsty: Jack's drawing, which sets off alarm bells for Moira.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: On the one hand, Jack is way too over the top about his father's supposed neglect. This is especially clear with the baseball game, where Peter makes every effort to be there, and still sends a co-worker to tape it, clearly showing that he does care about it. On the other, Jack, being still a child, doesn't necessarily understand that his father does unconditionally love him, forming a weak spot that Hook can exploit to turn him to his side.
  • Vindicated by Cable: The film has done quite well on cable, as well as ABC Family. As with many other films, it's referenced occasionally in Homestuck - complete with Rufio's death — which has also helped renew interest in it. Then Dante Basco himself started reading it. It also has certain nostalgic value for the 90s kids who grew up with it.
  • What The Hell Costuming Department:
    • Due to Disney's version of Tinker Bell being the most prolific version that everyone thinks of, one would think that a live-action one played by Julia Roberts would be just as adorable. Unfortunately, the costume she wears in the movie has a very dull, Real Is Brown vibe to it, along with scruffy hair that looks more in place with a Hobbit movie than with Peter Pan. According to Thomas Tulak, who played one of the Lost Boys, an earlier outfit was a blonde wig and a blue sequinned dress - and he recalls her storming out of her dressing room onto the set to complain about it.
    • Averted with Captain Hook, the costume is magnificent and captures the look very nicely.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/Hook