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Doctor Who
"What do you mean they won't take me seriously in this coat?!"

Victory... should be NARMFUL!!!


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    Classic Who 
  • A classic Doctor Who example — the Fifth Doctor's regeneration at the end of "The Caves of Androzani" can be summed up by three words: Nicola Bryant's cleavage. Hey, even Peter Davison later admitted it.
  • Everything about Daleks for some newer fans. They're such vicious monsters that it loops around from the other direction as cute. And despite being vicious monsters, people still make jokes about how they are unable to climb stairs. Even the writers themselves can't resist making said jokes, as with this "gem" from "Destiny of the Daleks":
    Doctor: If you're supposed to be the superior race of the universe, why don't you try climbing after us? Bye, bye.
  • "Excellent". Delivered by a Cyberman in a camp voice.
    • Speaking of the Cybermen, in their first appearance one of them surmises that Ben does not take them seriously as a threat. Given how the Cybermen talk in this story, Ben's hardly the only one...
      • Their voice is terrifying enough, but slightly ruined by the added "uh" at the end of every sentence.
  • Pretty much every line that comes out of Joseph Furst's mouth in The Underwater Menace. His closing line of episode 3, however ("NOZING IN ZE VORLD CAN SHTOP ME NOW!") takes the cake.
    • The whole episode in fan circles is known for its utter camp. In fact, it's even often referred to "Plan 9 from Doctor Who".
  • The Marshal in "The Armageddon Factor"
    "Taste the moment of victory. Any second now, beautiful mushrooms will blossom and burst!"
  • And then there's one of the franchise's most infamous lines from The Five Doctors:
    • What makes this delivery so narmful is not dull acting, or over-the-topness, or even the writing—the line is delivered, bafflingly, as though he read the sentence five times, enunciating a different word each time with each word enunciated in a different way than the last, and then composited the five line reads together in ADR. The end result is as such you can't tell what emotion, if any, is being aimed for. Shockingly, it was originally going to be high-pitched and camp.
  • The infamously blurred delivery of "Your will is weak, Doctor!" from "The King's Demons". Hell, that whole serial was full of Narm.
  • Oscar Botcherby's death in "The Two Doctors" is two courses of Narm with a side helping of ham, all the while having about one ketchup packet's worth of blood on his shirt.
  • The Eighth Doctor realizing what the Master has in mind for him in the TV movie.
    The Doctor: The Master wants to take all my remaining lives... SO THAT HE WILL LIVE AND I WILL DIE! NOOOOOO!!
    • The Master frequently declared that he 'wanted the Doctor's body' or something along those lines. The bondage-gear thing he put the Doctor in doesn't help. He just had that lying around, did he?
    • The Seventh Doctor's death on the operating table. A fairly well-done, intense scene (set to Puccini, no less!) falls apart when the Doctor gives one last ridiculous squawk agonized cry. Yes, that's what we'll call it...
    • The regeneration scene. CGI-aided gurning! And the bit where the Master possesses Eric Roberts and then drools all over himself. But, seriously, that movie is fun.
    • Though that last at least also gives us a nice Shirtless Scene, which might have been the point.
    • And then we have Eric Roberts as the Master. The campy, campy Master.
    The Master: [Swanning in wearing a Time Lord robe and striking a pose] I always dreeeeeess for the occasion.
    Paul McGann: [On the DVD commentary] Oh look. Are those stairs going to light up as he steps on them?
  • In the serial The Deadly Assassin, the Master is depicted as a decaying husk, as he is on his thirteenth and final life. This being the 1970's BBC, that meant the actor had to wear a cumbersome rubber mask, which sometimes muffled his lines. During the climatic scene where the Fourth Doctor and the Master face off, he utters this jewel:
    ''You know better than that Doctor! Even in extremis, I WEAH TEH TASH TEHTOGOO!"
  • The Greatest Show in the Galaxy has creepy robo-clowns, werewolves, and kickass explosions for a finale. Unfortunately, it also has a Totally Radical rapping Ringmaster. (Though his relentless cheerfulness may be Nightmare Fuel to some.)
  • The Mark of the Rani has land mines that turn people into trees! (The Rani; green before it was in!) And it leads to this gem of a line:
    The Doctor: The tree won't hurt you!
    • This is barely scratching the surface. Seriously, this episode is kind of awesome in a cracked-out way.
      • Topped off with volcanic-level Narm when the Rani knees the Master in the groin.
  • The Fifth Doctor story Earthshock has a scene in which the Doctor tries to appeal to the humanity of the Cybermen, and the last example he used was found ridiculous by the writers and the actors.
    "When was the last time you had the experience of smelling a flower, watching a sunset, eating a well-prepared meal?"
  • The Second Doctor serial "The Invasion" features a Cyberman wandering through the sewers, screaming in fear. For those familiar with the Cyberman, it's very disturbing — but at the same time the screams are more like hoots, so you have a Cyberman flapping its arms in the air going "Ooo hoo hoo hoo! Ooo hoo hoo hoo hoo!"
  • And a true Doctor Who classic, from the episode "Robot":
    The robot: Ooooh! I have killed the one who created me! (faints)
  • Milo Clancey and his cheesy American accent from the otherwise great story "The Space Pirates".
  • The Chase. Camp at its finest. One of the earlier scenes involves a hillbilly meeting the Doctor and a Dalek- and surviving!
  • The slo-mo stutter in one of The War Games's final cliffhangers.
    Doctor: Ccccoommmee onnnn!!!!
    Zoe: Wwhaatt iiss ittt??
    Doctor:Ttttiimmmmeee Llllloooordddss!!!
  • My DREEEAMS of con-QUEST from The Horns of Nimon
    • While the above is certainly the most narmful, pretty much the whole story is narm after narm after narm. And thats before the trousers splitting scene. It truly is So Bad, It's Good on sheer pantomime alone. Graham Crowden really steals the show; "LORD NIIIIIMON! It is I! Soldeeeeeeed!", "The Nimon be praised!" "IIIIIIII SAAAAAAAAAAW TWOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!"
    • The best part? Years earlier, the actor who delivered that glorious dose of camp turned down the opportunity to play The Fourth Doctor. Now imagine him in the role.
  • "Warriors of the Deep". Anything involving the Myrka, the most failing Doctor Who monster that ever failed. And then this one chick tries to judo chop it...
    • Looked more like a kick, but point made anyway.
  • Oh so many things from 'Attack of the Cybermen'. Things which really stand out are the escaping prisoners (one of which is perpetually angry) and the Cyberleader, of course. The fact he is twice as fat as any other Cyberman makes it nearly impossible to take anything he says seriously. A special mention to the Cyberman who seems to have a German accent too.
    • The Cyberleader's tendency to respond to any report from his underlings with a boisterous "EXCELLENT", was riffed on even by Colin Baker and the actor, David Banks. Especially the fact he continued to do so as things proceeded to go horrendeously wrong for him.
  • The manifestation of The Virus in "The Invisible Enemy" is not just unimpressive-looking, it's hilarious-looking. A big iridescent shrimp, shaped basically like a chess knight but with four limbs sticking horizontally out of its front that kick like a baby's, and whiskers that tremble emotionally as it brags about its impending domination of the universe. You just want to give it a hug. Hell, even the Doctor can't take it seriously.
    Doctor: What? That pathetic crustacean, your leader?
    • The serial also features Seeker White Blood Cells that are just large, fuzzy, obviously hollow white balls that attack the microscopic Leela by bouncing off her, to which she naturally reacts like she's in mortal peril.
  • A lot of the lines spoken by or spoken about the DJ (played by comedian Alexei Sayle) in "Revelation Of the Daleks" end up being pretty narmy.
    • Everything in "Revelation Of the Daleks" is pretty narmy.
  • The Web Planet. Oh lord, The Web Planet. Mostly in regards to the insect Halloween-costumes getups and ridiculous mannerisms of the bee-like Menoptra and grub-like Optra as well as the enemy Zarbi, who look like giant ants with a single pair of human legs and two pairs of useless ant legs and make siren noises at eachother. Also, one of the Manoptra constantly calls Ian "Heron" for no apparent reason.
  • Even though The Reveal that the Renegade Dalek Battle Computer in Remembrance of the Daleks is the little girl is genuinely shocking, Ratcliffe's face is still impossible not to laugh at.
  • Ev-er-y - line - spo-ken - by - Cot-ton - in - The - Mu-tants - e-spe-ci-a-lly - the - cliff-hang-er - at - the - end - of - ep-is-ode - five - it's - like - they - cast - a - tree.
  • The title characters in "The Twin Dilemma." Not only are they both horrible Dull Surprise actors who were obviously only hired for being identical twins, but they have a bad case of Elmuh Fudd Syndwome. "I am Womulus." "I am Wemus."
  • In Pyramids Of Mars, the entire episode is regarded as one of the best serials in the series's history-except for Sutekh's Big "NO!", which sounds like a high-pitched squeak.
    "Release meeee... OR I'LL DESTROY THE COSMOS!"
  • The 1985 charity single "Doctor in Distress", made to help save the show from cancellation. The lyrics are really awkward and sound like a list of facts about the show set to music. The video is hilariously '80s, and the BBC personalities singing in the video do a poor job and look embarrassed to be participating.
    • A YouTube user's comment showed that he hilariously mistook one line sung by Anthony Ainley (The Master) as "I had K-9 neutered!"
  • "Terror of the Vervoids": Bonnie Langford's screaming as Mel is already in a narmy league of its own, but she was specifically told by John Nathan-Turner to hold a scream in an "F" note so that it segued with the ending credits, which punched through a new layer of the narmmosphere.
  • Sylvester McCoy overclocks the ham in "Survival", making a serious line sound very, very, very melodramatic as he battles on the Cheetah World:
    "IF WE FIGHT LIKE ANIMALS, WE'LL DIIIIIIEE LIKE ANIMALS!"
    • Then, he repeats the line and completely overdraws his deposit at the Ham Bank after being teleported back to Earth:
    (arms are outstretched above him; starts gesturing with his eyes shut, and shaking wildly)
    "IF WE FIGHT LIKE ANIMALS, WE DIIIIIIIIIIIEE LIKE ANIMALS!"

    New Who 
  • Any scene in which the Doctor gets compared to God. This person once wore celery on his shirt, and he is irreverent toward almost everything.
    • Downplayed best by the Ninth Doctor:
    "Don't worship me, I'd make a very bad God. Wouldn't get a day off, for starters."
  • The first episode of New Who, in which we're supposed to believe that Rose doesn't notice her boyfriend has turned into a life-size Ken doll.
  • As referenced in the page quote, the Slitheen. In their true form: big green things with giant baby heads with their mouth movements badly synced to their speech.
    • While in their human forms, the Slitheen constantly fart. And giggle about it. After that, it's impossible to take their boasts about how "dangerous" they are seriously.
  • In "World War Three," Harriet Jones:
    "Noooooooo!!! Take MEEEE! Take MEEEE FIIIIRSSST!"
  • David Tennant can overact with the best of 'em, sometimes to great effect, other times to eye-rolling giggles. "NOW GET THEM OUT OF THERE!" springs to mind, as does the straight-faced "I'm sorry, they've been reduced to dust." And the overly-excited gurning of "Oh! The Lost Moon of Poosh!"
    "You're in their HOOOOMES, you've got their CHILDREN. Of course they're going to fight!"
  • The Cat-People *   Nun Nurses of "New Earth." Their response to a threat of "I'm armed!"?
    Chief Cat Nurse: Who needs arms when we have... CLAWS!
    • She holds up her hand... and one-centimeter claws extend from her fingers. Real intimidating, Sister.
    • And those were computer-generated. According to the DVD Commentary, they'd originally made a prop arm that would do that, but it looked "rubbish" — Phil Collinson even says he wouldn't want anyone to see the footage of it.
  • Every time Anthony Stewart Head starts screeching like a bat to summon the rest of the Krillitanes in the episode "School Reunion", especially considering his subtle and sinister performance up to then. On the other hand, can YOU think of any actor who could do that WITHOUT looking silly?
  • In "The Idiot's Lantern," The Wire is particularly narmy.
    • Eddie Connolly as well. Possibly even more so since his subplot deals with the serious subject of domestic abuse, making his childlike ranting even more awkward.
  • "The Satan Pit" was creepy for most of the episode; but when the Beast was going through everyone's secrets and fears, the moment was ruined when it got to Toby's and proclaimed...
    "The Virgin!"
    • While it was partially redeemed by the pants-shittingly terrifying 50-storey tall demon from hell, the climax of "The Satan Pit" is pretty much 10 minutes of nonstop hamming from David Tennant while the Beast growls at him periodically. And Tennant makes the weirdest faces when he monologues.
    • During said monolgue, Ten says that the Beast has been rendered completely mindless. Then the thing chuckles evilly at him. And the rest of the episode has the Beast mind-controlling people, so he can't be that mindless... really, writers, what was the point of that line?
    • That the Beast's body had been rendered mindless?
    • Two words: "We're... turning." Made even Narmier by the fact the actors appear to lean to one side BEFORE the rocket tilts. That, and the actor's weirdly flat, lifeless delivery of the line.
  • "Love & Monsters" was lighthearted enough until The Reveal of the Absorbaloff, which would have been scary if not for two things - first, he kept making these weird faces when he wasn't talking, and when he chased Elton out of the meeting room, trying to absorb him. Seeing an overweight monster with a northern accent chase a grown man while giggling absolutely killed the tension.
    • The Absorbaloff looks, acts and sounds like an alien version of Fat Bastard. How anybody at the BBC thought the viewers would find him menacing is a mystery.
      • It was designed by a nine year old. There you go.
  • The Racnoss Empress from "The Runaway Bride": "MYYYYY CHIIIIIIILDREEEEEEEEENNNNN!"
  • In "Smith and Jones" we see these fearsome creatures marching in... that look like giant rhinos in leather. And it gets better: When the Judoon first speaks, it sounds like a first grader rhyming things with "oh".
    • Becomes Accidental Innuendo in "The Stolen Earth" when the Doctor says "Ma' ho" in the presence of Donna. And the Doctor said he didn't want to mate with her...
    • The old (alien) granny sucking blood... with a straw thru.
  • Shakespeare being possessed in "The Shakespeare Code." The witches have scary potential and they use scary puppets, but they control Shakespeare by blowing a acid-green gas (how did he not see it?) into his room, which he inhales up one nostril. The possessed man then begins writing, staring straight ahead with his mouth clamped shut. It looks like he's trying very hard not to laugh.
  • From "Gridlock":
    "MAAAAARTHAAAAAAAA!"
    • The Doctor's final description of Gallifrey at the end of the episode is unfortunately soppy, due to a three-way combination of the writing ("that ol' planet!"), David Tennant's delivery slowly but surely marching over the Large Ham line, and his being shot in close-up as he looks wistfully up beyond the camera like he's about to break into "When You Wish Upon a Star" (and in fact, the New New Yorkers reprise their hymn-singing in the soundtrack right on cue).
  • The actor playing Baines in "Human Nature" isn't easy to take seriously due to his strange, exaggerated delivery of certain lines and the ridiculous, Jim Carrey-esque facial expressions he makes.
    • That, and his scream. The actor also played Viserys in Game of Thrones, and the levels of Narm for either character are off the charts.
  • The Tenth Doctor as Tinkerbell Jesus in the Season Three finale. The previous scenes with Ten as a Gallifreyan house elf didn't help.
  • This bit in "Voyage of the Damned."
    • The Big Bad in that episode turns out to be a cybernetic head in a plexiglass box who talks with the voice of Dr. Evil.
      Max Capricorn: [I will] retire to the beaches of Pentaxico Two where the ladies, so I'm told, are fond of... MET-TAL!
    • Also the scene where Astrid is turned to dust and disappears through a window: meant to be poignant, but rather subverted by the statement: "She's just atoms now, Doctor." (Like she was what before — strange quarks?)
  • In "Partners In Crime," Miss Foster's narmful claims that she's beloved and necessary because she's the nanny. Thankfully she was dropped to her death soon thereafter.
  • In the episode "Planet of the Ood," Donna passionately proclaims about the Ood, "They're born with their brains in their hands!" It was supposed to be touching, but the sheer oddity of this line made it equal parts giggler and headscratcher.
  • In "The Sontaran Stratagem" two-parter:
    Sontar-HA! Sontar-HA! Sontar-HA! Sontar-HA!
    • Too bad, too. It started out creepy; then the insufferable Teen Genius joined in, and then it just looked stupid. In the end, it was a Crowning Moment Of Awesome for a character who had been a insufferable bag of douche up until then; before then, it was just plain silly. Even the Doctor changed the channel.
    • Luke Rattigan's utterly pathetic and babyish reactions when his academia don't immediately commit to his selfish and thoughtless plans to ship off the Earth. It reveals him to be nothing more than an insecure, quivering brat who is lashing out for being bulled in the past as a gifted child.
    Rattigan: And I chose you to survive. With Planetfall we can start again. We can build and breed, we can prosper, we can do anything.
    Woman: We're going to breed?
    Rattigan: I've designed a mating program. I've planned the whole thing.
    Woman: Well then, shoot me.
    Ratigan: Stay where you are. Stay where you are, I said. Stay where you are.
    (Luke is obviously full of crap, making empty threats, and the whole group of academia knows it just by looking at him. The woman leaves, and other students follow her.)
    Rattigan: Stay where you are. That's an order!
    Man: Castor Thirty Six? You're just sick.
    (Rattigan is left alone.)
    • And then comes the most pretentious, hopeless, and childish ranting of all, sounding like the biggest wussy you've ever met:
    Ratigan: I guess that just proves it. I'm cleverer then you. (breaking down, disillusioned) I'm cleverer then EVERYONE, DO YOU HEAR ME!? (In an absolutely pitiful, very shrill, almost emasculating shriek from a real puss) I'M CLEVER!!!
    • The same actor's intonation of "Earth!" during a particularly dramatic moment only makes him sound like he's channeling Father Jack:
      "... the ruins of his precious... ARSE!"
    • His "I'm clever than you!" (not an error—he seems to be asserting that he is more clev) that seems to be his catch phrase sounds very awkward as well.
    • "The planet is going nuclear!" The way this line was delivered makes it Narm. Unfortunately, it was used in every TV spot for the episode.
      • It's not so bad in context, though - he's not making some dramatic threat about what the Sontarans are going to do to the planet, he's just amused that the humans are resorting to nuclear weapons.
    • Likewise, Martha gets the last line before the opening credits, and delivers it... well, like she knows it's the last line before the opening credits.
  • The death of the Hath that helps Martha in "The Doctor's Daughter" counts because the Hath are humanoid fish people whose sole form of communication seems to be a bubbling noise. When the one that befriends Martha sinks to his death in quicksand, it makes it hard to muster much sympathy.
    Martha: Nooooo!
    Hath: <bubble bubble bubble>
  • In "Silence In The Library," when Ms. Evangelista is ghosting. It was creepy and sad until she started saying, "Ice cream. Ice cream. Ice cream..."
    • The moment when Ms. Evangelista's body is first discovered: River Song tries to contact her on the communicator, and her voice instantly echoes back from the device on the skeleton right in front of them. The Doctor nods grimly at the skeleton and even points his flashlight right at it—and yet River continues trying to page Ms. Evangelista!
      • And then she slowly picks up the communicator and stares at it with a dumbfounded expression, while cheesy Harry Potter-esque music plays. "It's her! That's Miss Evangelista!" Gee... ya think?
  • "Turn Left," the moment when a TV reporter says that millions of Americans were turned into fat. Something is just hilarious about this statement. The description ("The fat is walking") just makes it funnier.
  • The Doctor and Rose's Meadow Run in "The Stolen Earth" was this, especially as it seemed to go on forever.
    • The Narm was only amplified when the Doctor was shot by a Dalek.
    • Captain Jack's, "Good luck, Doctor!" when he was about to regenerate from being grazed by the Dalek sounded so cheesy. And Donna being completely out of the loop, "WILL SOMEONE PLEASE TELL ME WHAT'S GOING ON?", coupled with a tearful Rose worried that her boyfriend-ish Doctor was about to change faces into someone new again just did not mesh with the huge tensions that scene called for.
    • The whole episode was narmy. The scene with Earth being flown back is just bizarre. Also the fact the Earth was shaking so much means that the Earth will be in ruins by the time they get back.
    • The Meta Crisis Doctor is just Narm as well. An Ass Pull about how suddenly another Doctor can grow from a hand using regeneration energy. And it is conveniently human so can stay with Rose. The scene on the beach was a wave of narm.
  • The Tritovore from "Planet of the Dead" — "Humanoid fly creatures, they trade with other civilizations for their excrement." Turned out to resemble the central character from the original (1950's) version of The Fly.
    • In perhaps the most ironic twist and a case of Special Effects Failure, one lone fly- as in a real fly- decides to zip into the shot during one of the scenes when the Tenth Doctor and Christina are out in the desert of San Helios alone, and land on the Doctor's tie, skitter around, then buzz off. It's too small that it was left unnoticed in post-production, but it completely ruins the illusion that they are on a devoured world with all the life reduced to sand- including teeny tiny flies. That's all it took to blow the Willing Suspension of Disbelief. One fly. All by itself. In a desert. In Dubai.
  • The Tenth Doctor's "IT'S NOT FAIR!" rant in "The End of Time."
    • Worse, David Tennant gets so worked up he knocks stuff off a desk and visibly drools a stringy, sticky, dripping horker of saliva.
    • What makes this rant especially narmful is that he's bitching about how when he dies, all he does is just regenerate. Really, Doctor? You have regenerated eleven times and it only just bothers you now?! Especially when death is often a minor inconvenience for you. In light of The Time of the Doctor, this is doubly narmful.
      • Or perhaps it isn't- the Doctor may be remembering events from "The Day of the Doctor" subconsciously, believing this will be his last regeneration since he's down to the twelfth and final one left of his cycle and as far as he knows, the Time Lords are el gonzo. Perhaps he thinks he's about to go embark on the path that leads him to his ultimate death.
  • "I don't wanna go!"
    • Redeemed when the Tenth Doctor said it in a passing conversation during The Day of the Doctor. He was simply saying something he always says in plain, congenial conversation, and not a big narmy last line. It portrays him in more of a sympathetic and tragic figure.
  • Part one of the last Tenth Doctor Christmas special could be seen as this when the Master destroys the human race by overwriting himself onto every person. His laughing along with his duplicates doesn't help.
    • Particularly the line, "There is only... the MASTER RACE!" John Simm is a good actor, but there was no way he could deliver that line with dignity.
    • Also in that episode: Upon being asked by a burger-cart lady what he wants on his burger, the Master snarls, "EVERYTHING. I am SO. HUNGRY."
    • And DINNER TIIIIME also happens on GARBAGE DAY, along with flying up into the air and dive-bombing homeless men.
      • In other words, the hammy, echoing delivery of "DINNER TIME" and the fact it happens where garbage is being taken is a reminder of this similarly hammy performance.
    • The Master flying into the air, period.
    • The Master as he attacks President Rassillon with lightning. As his skeleton begins superheating, you see his x-ray bones and eyeballs... with the eyeballs staring in opposite directions in full on derp-face.
  • "It is said that in the final days of planet Earth, everyone had bad dreams." Made worse because this was used in all the trailers for "The End of Time."
  • In the final Tenth Doctor story, the Master is revived by a secret cult. But there is absolutely no indication that these people were aware that he was an evil Time Lord; he is technically being resurrected by a cult devoted to a dead Prime Minister. This is hilarious when you think about it.
    • To understand the absurdity of the situation, it's like if members of the Labour Party were meeting in the dungeons of Transport House to bring Harold Wilson back to life.
      • I could imagine how certain circles might perform religious rituals to resurrect Ronald Reagan.
  • Matt Smith spitting as foam debris and other junk rains down on him from the ceiling in his first scene and makes it hard for him to breathe without getting choked. Some people actually complained it was a bad behavior impression for the children.
  • From "Victory of the Daleks," the reveal of the new Dalek paradigm is sold as extremely dramatic and scary, featuring intimidating new tank-like designs for the monsters, but is somewhat ruined by the bright, happy colours the new Daleks have been painted in. Bright orange and yellow Daleks do not exactly inspire fear.
  • The climactic ending from "The Impossible Astronaut," whose Slow Motion made the characters sound a bit thick.
    Doctor: What are you doing!
    Amy: SAVING YOUUR LIIIIIFFFEE!
  • "Where is my Thieeeeeef? THIEEEEEEEEF!"
  • Jimmy's conversation with his son in "The Almost People" is part Glurge and part Nightmare Fuel because the child actor's habit of pulling his shirt up while asking "Where's my daddy?" makes the recording look like it was lifted straight from child pornography.
  • That undignified wail that escapes Restac's throat when she discovers Alaya's corpse in "Cold Blood".
  • "The Girl Who Waited" has many tragic moments. Unfortunately, the gratuitous slow-motion near the end gets a bit... distracting.
    Rory: WAAAUGH! [smashes a Mona Lisa over a robot's head]
  • The scene where the Doctor sees Rory and Amy again in "Closing Time" is all kinds of sweet and heartbreaking. But when you get it into your head that it's because Amy is promoting a perfume named after petrichor, i.e. wet dirt, that bit causes inappropriate giggles.
  • The Eleventh Doctor pretending to have a mini-showdown with a guy in "A Town Called Mercy". It's only a few seconds long, but it was rather silly. In a bad way. Also the Gunslinger's cry of "FACE ME!" came off as aping Bane.
  • At the end of "The Power of Three," Amy's narration gets kind of Glurgey and more than a bit Captain Obvious, making an otherwise solid episode end on a narm-y note:
    So that was the year of the slow invasion. When the earth got cubed and the Doctor came to stay. It was also when we realized something the Shakri never understood. What "cubed" actually means. The Power of Three.
  • In "The Angels Take Manhattan," in the middle of the heartbreaking scene where Rory and Amy prepare to throw themselves off the top of a building killing themselves to create a paradox to wipe out the Weeping Angels, Steven Moffat decided to lampshade Rory never staying dead.
    Amy: So you think you'll just come back to life?
    Rory: When don't I?!
    • It ruined the atmosphere a little bit.
    • Not only does the Statue of Liberty not attack them even though neither one is looking at it, it completely disappears mid-scene! It's hard to feel any emotion other then bewilderment at such a distracting plot hole.
    • The entire plot can basically be summed up as "Time can't be rewritten this week" (clearly the Doctor hasn't seen Back to the Future II recently). The idea that reading a "fictional" story can fix time as firmly as witnessing the event seems contrived. And heaven only knows how the Melody Malone book reads to anyone in-series who isn't our heroes....
  • Clara's dying words in "The Snowmen" are "Run you clever boy - and remember." The line is meant as a Call Back to a previous episode, but since it makes no sense in the context of the scene, it comes across as awkward and forced.
  • The Doctor RIDING A MOTORCYCLE UP A BUILDING in The Bells of Saint John. It's as ridiculous, and awesome, as it sounds.
  • The actors playing Clara's parents (Ellie and Dave) are really like two pieces of cardboard. Actually, that whole opening is ridiculous - beginning from the leaf (which is a birch leaf and not a maple leaf like the one later found in Clara's book) falling in her father's face (to which he reacts with an over-the-top gasp and the camera does a weird fish-eye/zoom effect), to Clara's mother rescuing him (and blandly inquiring "Oh my stars. Are you all right?"), and finally to the father's speech on the doorstep regarding said leaf:
    Ellie: You kept it?
    Dave: Of course I kept it!
    Ellie: Why?
    Dave: Because this exact leaf had to grow in that exact way, in that exact place, so that precise wind could tear it from that precise branch and make it fly into this exact face at that exact moment...
    • It's just really awkward phrasing and quite poorly acted. There's also the fact that Michael Dixon, who plays Clara's father, is thirty, while Jenna-Louise Coleman (who plays adult Clara) is 27. Seeing them standing beside each other at Clara's mother's grave is utterly ridiculous - apparently the makeup department thought that Dixon would look believable if they simply put some faux gray colour in his hair. He doesn't.
    Clara’s dad regenerated sometime since 2005.
    • Also, the absurdly loud slapping sound to try to convince us the leaf hit her father's face hard enough to disorient him and make him wander into traffic. It doesn't work, and it just looks like he has an extremely weak forehead.
      • However, it's all kind of fixed by the fact the Doctor's been helping them, and the shots of him standing there slightly annoyed.
  • The Ice Warrior creeping up behind Stepashin is less like an intense, scary moment, but more like the Ice Warrior was about to do more than kill the guy. His dialogue and hand movements did not help.
  • One we can blame on the costuming department: Vastra's entrance in "The Crimson Horror" has her wearing a veil, until she lifts it up accompanied by a Scare Chord. Except, her face is perfectly visible behind the veil, not that it stops another scene a bit later from also playing out like the veil is completely opaque.
    • At one point, in this episode or some other episode, a perception filter in the veil was mentioned. Perception filters are variable in their effects on camera.
    • Mrs. Gillyflower's "Die!... ''Die!'... Die!" is kinda funny. Lady, pointing a gun at 5 separate people, one being a lizard, who are practically surrounding you, with the inability of hitting the broad side of a barn door whilst standing next to it and shouting "die" doesn't make you threatening.
    • The thing that the "Crimson Horror" does to its victims makes them look horrifying, but on the Doctor, his movements make him look like that he has had a really strong sunburn. And the scene where Edmund runs into the room starts off as terrifying...then is utterly ruined by him falling onto the floor in a really awkward position. Oh yes, and his screaming face when he dies is kind of hilarious.
  • In "The Name of the Doctor", Clara is finally saved from the Doctor's timestream when he sends the leaf for her to catch. She then awkwardly staggers over to him and starts weeping in his arms. Note that the Doctor is only, like, ten feet away for this whole scene, but Clara apparently needs a magical leaf to find him, and those few steps are made to look like a Herculean effort. It was probably meant to be touching, but it came off as Kingdom Hearts-level cheesy.
    • Not to mention "Introducing John Hurt as The Doctor", punctuated with EXTREMELY DRAMATIC BASS DRUM HITS every few words. Subtle.
    • The message itself also reads rather hypocritical since before that text drop, The Doctor was ranting about how the mysterious figure Hurt was playing was unworthy of being called The Doctor.
  • "The Night of the Doctor" gives us the return of Paul McGann as the Eighth Doctor, but his dramatic Final Speech hits a snag when he puts an AcCENT Upon the Wrong SylLABle: "Cass, I apoloGIZE."
  • Although you may not think it mattered, many upon many people were steamed when David Tennant had his hair slicked down in "The Day of the Doctor" rather than peaked up in spikes like they had grown to recognize as the Tenth Doctor's trademark.
    • The Moment might as well be called "The Narmy Moment", mocking the War Doctor by parroting "NO MORE" in a gawking manner and being a teasing trickster.
    • The War Doctor gets a Narm moment of his own for being billed as The Dreaded, yet half a head shorter in stature compared to his successors. And the fact when he got puzzled over the interface of the Moment, he just wanted a big red button to blow up Gallifrey comes off as absurdly inappropriate in the wake of committing genocide, and he was regretting it coming to this, until you realize it's a hint of the old Doctor shining through, being eccentric again and perhaps desperately trying to lighten the mood.
    • There's that matter of every Doctor showing up to save Gallifrey, but their scenes are lifted from archive footage that is really easy to identify, plus some of them don't even match up. Example: The Seventh Doctor switching between his season 24 appearance and the TV movie outfit, looking older by almost ten years. Unless two different Seventh Doctors from separate points in the timeline coordinated with each other, we're calling bogus!
    • The War Doctor's regeneration into the Ninth Doctor getting cut off and we see part of Christopher Eccleston's face with John Hurt's beard. That's the closest we got to a full transition without somebody going in and editing the footage to complete the change.
    • That "I don't want to go" departing line from the Tenth Doctor. This time, it's a bit more welcome, but it was nearly obvious, perhaps even obligatory that this was going to end up as his last line in the special.
    • The Curator congratulating the Eleventh Doctor comes more across as Tom Baker giving his accolades to Matt Smith. But what really adds Narm is the fact you can see Jenna Coleman hiding in the TARDIS prop right after she steps inside and the Doctor begins musing about becoming a curator... the door of the prop did not shut completely, and a sliver of her torso can be witnessed squirming around, trying to stay out of the shot. Rather than cut to have Jenna step offscreen, they just rolled the scene on with her standing inside the dark interior of the blue box. Come on!
  • The "Silence will Fall" Wham Line in "The Time of the Doctor" when the whole Papal Mainframe chants it seems really forced. Worse, they make a complete mockery of what faith should be by reverting it to little more than a daily business agenda with an "unscheduled faith change".
    • There is a friggin' Dalek tank in the background of a shot on Trenzalore. This could have been cool, except that tanks are extremely notorious when it comes to mobility and breakdowns in reality, and they would be enormously difficult, not to mention expensive, to operate. What we get is basically an antique tank with a silly egg whisk and giant plunger edifice added to the end of its tank barrel, spray-painted black. And that big donkey construct just sits around as a background prop piece sticking out like a sore thumb, no CGI to animate it or anything. It's Rule of Cool, but squandered Rule Of Cool.


    Narm/Live-Action TVGame of Thrones

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