Manga / JoJo's Bizarre Adventure

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Volume 28 of 117! DIO (top left) confronted by Jotaro (bottom right).

"This story depicts the mysterious Stone Mask from Mexico, and its effect on the destinies of two youngsters and their Bizarre Adventures!"
The prologue of chapter 1. Of 903 and counting.

JoJo's Bizarre Adventure (Jojo no Kimyou na Bouken) is the story of the Joestar family and its endless conflicts with the supernatural. The series spans well over 100 years (and volumes).

In the late 1800s, rich kid Jonathan Joestar (a.k.a. JoJo) is introduced to a newly orphaned youth named Dio Brando. Jonathan's wealthy father George takes the boy in and raises him as his own to return the favor for Dio's late father, who accidentally saved George & Jonathan after a buggy crash that killed George's wife & Jonathan's mother, Mary. However, Dio is secretly scheming to take Jonathan's place as the favored son and heir to the Joestar family fortune. He torments Jonathan throughout their childhood in an attempt to break him. When Jonathan's resolve seems insurmountable, Dio takes a new approach: building up a bond between them over many years while poisoning George. Things become complicated when Jonathan learns of these plans and confronts Dio, only for Dio to become a vampire using an ancient stone mask that Jonathan had been researching. After a fiery battle, Jonathan is informed by a man named William A. Zeppeli that Dio is still alive and plans to take over the world. He sets out on an adventure to train in the ways of Hamon and destroy his undying foe for good.

That's just the first part of the currently eight parts long immense saga of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure.

The series eventually evolved into a multi-generational epic, following the adventures of Jonathan's descendants from the 19th century to the present day. Each part of the saga chronicles the adventures of another descendant of the Joestar bloodline, which spreads all over the world and gets pretty darn confusing. They all have three things in common: A star shaped birthmark, a destiny to fight evil, and the nickname JoJo. The story is split into eight parts, the first six of which form their own saga focusing on the impact of the Stone Mask on the Joestar family's lives. The series undergoes a Continuity Reboot of sorts with the storylines that occur afterward, set in an Alternate Universe that features many of the elements from these first six storylines.

The series is (currently) broken down to these eight parts:

  1. Phantom Blood (Ran from Jan. 1, 1987 to Oct. 26, 1987; originally titled Jonathan Joestar: His Youth)note 
    • In 1880's Britain, Jonathan Joestar, the son of an English nobleman, finds his life turned upside-down when scheming street urchin Dio Brando becomes his adoptive brother. Dio does all he can to usurp Jonathan's place as heir to the Joestar fortune by driving Jonathan mad by driving away everyone close to him. When Jonathan proves unbreakable, Dio instead plots to poison their Father. Jonathan catches him in the act, and Dio turns himself into a vampire using a mysterious Stone Mask Jonathan's father acquired from an antiques dealer. Although Jonathan believes he successfully killed Dio in their first fight, with help from reformed street thug Robert E. O. Speedwagon, he later learns from Italian eccentric Will A. Zeppeli that Dio still lives and is building an army of undead servants. Zeppeli teaches Jonathan a mystical martial art that channels life energy known as Hamon, the only thing that can kill Dio before he takes over the world.
      This arc was adapted into a beat-'em-up PS2 game and a film, both titled JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Phantom Blood, as well as the first half of the 2012 anime.
  2. Battle Tendency (Ran from Nov. 2, 1987 to Mar. 27, 1989; originally titled Joseph Joestar: His Proud Lineage)note 
    • Set in 1938, Joseph Joestar is the rough-and-tumble but extremely clever grandson of Jonathan with a natural proficiency in Hamon, and lives in New York City with his grandmother Erina. After learning his "uncle" Speedwagon has been kidnapped by Waffen-SS researchers in Mexico led by Commander Rudol von Stroheim, Joseph goes to save him. However, he saves both Speedwagon and Stroheim from an ancient superhuman being known as a Pillar Man, the race that created the Stone Masks, vulnerable only to sunlight. Stroheim informs Joseph of three other Pillar Men the German forces discovered in Italy, so he travels to Europe, meeting up with fellow Hamon user Caesar Zeppeli (Will's grandson) to stop them. Joseph and Caesar are soundly defeated, but Joseph manages to bluff them into sparing him in exchange for putting up a better fight later. Caesar takes Joseph to train under his own Hamon teacher: the mysterious, beautiful, and deadly Lisa Lisa, who knows more about Joseph than she leads on. Meanwhile the Pillar Men seek the Red Stone of Aja, an artifact that when combined with the Stone Masks will make them truly immortal Ultimate Beings.
      This arc was adapted into the second half of the 2012 anime, mentioned below.
  3. Stardust Crusaders (Ran from Apr. 3, 1989 to Apr. 27, 1992; originally titled Jotaro Kujo: Heritage for the Future)note 
    • Set in 1989, Joseph visits his daughter Holly at her home in Japan as she needs his help to convince her son, Jotaro Kujo, to leave a jail cell as Jotaro fears he has been possessed by an evil spirit. With the help of Egyptian fortune teller Mohammed Avdol, Joseph manages to prove to Jotaro that what he has is a mysterious power known as a Stand, which has been awoken in the Joestar family as a result of the resurrection of Dio Brando, now known only as "DIO" (written in Gratuitous English for good measure), who is sending several Stand-using assassins after Joseph and Jotaro to prevent them from stopping his rise to power. After fighting classmate Noriaki Kakyoin, who was put under DIO's thrall, the group discovers that Holly has formed her own Stand and it is slowly killing her due to her kind nature. Joseph, Jotaro, Avdol, Kakyoin, and later Frenchman Jean-Pierre Polnareff and the Stand-using dog Iggy, must head to Egypt to kill DIO once and for all to save Holly's life, while battling DIO's many Stand-using assassins along the way.
      This arc has been adapted to a three-part CD drama, a Super Famicom RPG, two OVAs published from 1993-1994 and 2000-2002 (all titled JoJo's Bizarre Adventure), and an arcade Fighting Game by Capcom titled JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Heritage for the Future. In 2014, it received a 48-episode anime adaptation like Phantom Blood and Battle Tendency.
  4. Diamond is Unbreakable (Ran from May 4, 1992 to Dec. 4, 1995; occasionally referred to as Diamond is not Crash/Crush after a mistranslation from the part's earliest scanslations; originally titled Josuke Higashikata)note 
    • Set in 1999, Jotaro travels to the northeastern Japanese town of Morioh to track down Joseph's illegitimate teenage son (and technically his own uncle) Josuke Higashikata in order to sort out Josuke's placement in Joseph's will, as well as warn him of a dangerous Stand-user Joseph foretold. After encountering this Stand-user, Jotaro and Josuke learn that he obtained his Stand as the result of being struck with an ancient arrow fired from a bow used by a local high school student. Jotaro stays in town to find the bow and arrow, believed to be the source of the Joestar family's Stands, while Josuke encounters multiple Stand-users created as a result of the arrow, including classmates Koichi Hirose and Okuyasu Nijimura and local famous manga author Rohan Kishibe. After the bow and arrow is retrieved, and Josuke reunited with his father Joseph, the group learns from the earthbound ghost of a murder victim that there is a Stand-using serial killer loose in town. Josuke and his friends must find the murderer, Yoshikage Kira, before his murder spree continues, thwarted by several other Stand users created in the wake of losing the bow and arrow once more.
      An anime adaptation was confirmed on October 24, 2015, and the first episode aired on April 1, 2016; it is scheduled to run for 39 episodes. An OVA of its spin-off, Thus Spoke Rohan Kishibe, will be a bonus for those who buy the entire DVD set for Part 4.
  5. Vento Aureo (Italian for "Golden Wind"; ran from Dec. 11, 1995 to Apr. 5, 1999; originally titled Giorno Giovanna: Golden Heritage)note 
    • Set in 2001, Jotaro sends Koichi Hirose to Italy to seek a boy named Giorno Giovanna, one of DIO's sons conceived with Jonathan's body after his resurrection in the 1980s. After finding Giorno and seeing that he is not evil but a righteous young man like other members of the Joestar family, he is left alone as he seeks to take over the mafia from the inside out to turn it into an organization for good rather than evil. He joins a mafia squadron of fellow Stand users with leader Bruno Buccellati, Leone Abacchio, Guido Mista, Narancia Ghirga, and Pannacotta Fugo, and their first order is to protect their Boss's daughter Trish Una from other members of the mob who want to take her hostage to take the mob for themselves. However, it is all a ruse to enable their boss Diavolo to kill his own daughter to protect his true identity. What follows is a roadtrip throughout all of Italy, fending off attacks from rival mobsters and then stopping Diavolo himself.
      This arc was adapted into a beat-'em-up PS2 game titled Le Bizzarre Avventure di GioGio: Vento Aureo.
  6. Stone Ocean (Ran from Jan. 1, 2000 to Apr. 21, 2003; originally titled Jolyne Cujoh: Stone Ocean)note 
    • Set in 2011, Jotaro's daughter Jolyne Cujohnote , is framed for murder by a crazed disciple of DIO and sent to Florida's Green Dolphin Street Prison. Before she is completely incarcerated, Jotaro manages to awaken Jolyne's Stand powers and warn her of what is to come when he is rendered comatose when prison chaplain Father Enrico Pucci, another of DIO's disciples, manages to use his own Stand to steal Jotaro's memories in order to further DIO's agenda. Jolyne must team up with fellow Stand-using inmates Ermes Costello, Weather Report, Narciso Anasui, sentient Stand-using plankton colony Foo Fighters, and the young boy Emporio Alniño to stop other Stand-using inmates and staff all to prevent Father Pucci from remaking the world in DIO's image.
  7. Steel Ball Run (Ran from Feb. 2, 2004 to Apr. 19, 2011; from this part onwards, the manga switched from being serialized on a weekly basis in Weekly Shonen Jump to being serialized on a monthly basis in Ultra Jump)note 
    • Set in 1890, a transcontinental horse race called the Steel Ball Run is held in the United States. Johnny Joestar, a former prodigy jockey who became paralyzed from the waist down after an accident, enters the race to learn the secret of competitor Gyro Zeppeli's mysterious weaponized spinning steel balls after they briefly restore his ability to walk. What Johnny doesn't realize is that he will be plunged into multiple conspiracies involving the king of Naples, American President Funny Valentine, and the corpse of a holy man who may or may not be Jesus, whose mummified remains grant people Stand powers.
      This arc has been adapted to an internet-based radio drama titled Steel Ball Run.
  8. JoJolion (Began on May 19, 2011)note 
    • Set in 2012, strange structures called "Wall Eyes" appear in the town of Morioh, Japan following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami. Near these Wall Eyes, a young woman named Yasuho Hirose discovers an amnesiac young Stand-User who, after some confusion as to whether he is one "Yoshikage Kira", she decides to name "Josuke" along with arranging him to stay with her neighbors, the Higashikata family. Together, the newly named Josuke Higashikata and Yasuho attempt to help Josuke restore his memories, which the Higashikatas need to help lift a curse which has plagued their family for generations and has connections to Johnny Joestar. However, they are thwarted by mysterious Stand-using stone-based human beings and apparently members of the Higashikata family itself.

Created in 1987 by the mangaka Hirohiko Araki, the series is famous for its original and unique art style, intricate plot, creative battles, and immense flamboyancy. It also features a huge number of allusions to Western rock music, including characters named DIO, Speedwagon, and Zeppeli, just to name a few. Although JoJo's Bizarre Adventure has not been able to receive recognition like other imported manga and anime (primarily due to the egregious legal issues caused by the wide number of musical references), it is still very well-received by fans all over. With the insane kind of plots that involve sapient plankton, turtles that are bigger on the inside, and Rock, Paper, Scissors death matches, is it any wonder?

Western audiences are likely more familiar with the memes the series has produced because of the series' general theme (read: badassery), as well as the Capcom fighting game Heritage For The Future and OVA adaptations of Stardust Crusaders, though the most recent anime has been giving it a greater amount of exposure among mainstream anime fans.

To commemorate the manga's 25th anniversary in 2012, an HD port of the above fighting game was released, an anime adaptation produced by David Productions, written by Yasuko Kobayashi, and covering Part 1 and Part 2 debuted, and a fighting game called JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: All-Star Battle was released as well. The anime was followed up in 2014 with an adaptation of Part 3, and All Star Battle was released outside of Japan in the same year. The animated adaptation by David Productions can legally be viewed on Crunchyroll. At Anime Expo 2015, it was confirmed that the 2012 anime, covering Part 1 and Part 2, will be getting an English dub. In late October 2015, it was confirmed that there would be an adaptation of Part 4, which began airing on April 1, 2016. In 2015, All-Star Battle received a sequel titled JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Eyes of Heaven, which features tag-team battles in interactive 3D environments, as well as an original storyline. In 2016, an English dub of Part 3 was announced (with the test dub's cast returning), as well as the reveal that the anime will finally see its long-awaited debut on American airwaves via Toonami starting in October.

There is also the series of spinoffs of one-shots chronicling the adventures of the eccentric Author Avatar manga-artist Rohan Kishibe, Thus Spoke Kishibe Rohan, which sometimes gets serialized either on the Weekly Shonen Jump or Jump SQ. The chapters/one-shots (the first one published back in 1997) are going to be finally compiled into its first tankoubon (trade paperback). Also important to remark that Kishibe has also starred similar special one-shots such as Rohan at The Louvre (in collaboration with the Musée du Louvre) and Kishibe Rohan Goes to Gucci as an special collaboration between Araki, Gucci and Spur Magazine in 2011. An OVA of this spinoff series will be made available to anyone who purchases the entire Blu-Ray set of the Diamond is Unbreakable anime.

There is a Character Sheet for each of the parts, so post character tropes there.

Because of the sheer number of trope present in the manga, the trope examples list has been split into sub-pages:


Alternative Title(s): Jojos Bizarre Adventure

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