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Thinking Out Loud
Soliloquy: A dramatic or literary form of discourse in which a character talks to themself or reveals their thoughts without addressing a listener.

Thinking Loudly occurs in the odd circumstance that a character is talking to himself/herself out loud and they could easily be thinking the same thing, but just don't. Villains do this a LOT. It's usually a form of As You Know: often the character would be better off hiding their thoughts from people who might hear them, but, of course, the audience needs to be informed...

The difference with Did I Just Say That Out Loud? is that that trope incorporates an Outer Monologue when other characters are in the room and happen to hear what the character was thinking because he/she blurted it out. This is where they are speaking out loud intentionally, and/or if they learn nothing from the experience.

Surrogate Soliloquy and Inner Monologue are tropes which are deliberate aversions. Inner Monologue conversation is an aversion in which others respond anyway. Audience Monologue is similar, but is intentionally directed to the audience. Breaking the Fourth Wall and addressing the audience is another aversion, but much older. If the character is looking in the direction of the audience but not saying anything that strictly proves they're aware of the audience rather than just Thinking Out Loud, that's Aside Comment. Placebo Eureka Moment is when there is someone else there, but the character isn't really talking to them. An extremely common case of Truth in Television; people often forget to close their mouths while thinking.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime & Manga 
  • Bleach's Squad 4 third seat (Yasochika Iemura) does this, even in the DS video games (where they account for most of his lines). Everyone tells him they can hear him, but he continues.
  • Gatomon in Digimon Adventure does this while pondering her past. Wizardmon overhears her and asks a question. Not realizing she was talking out loud, Gatomon gets angry believing Wizardmon was reading her mind.
  • From Digimon Savers we have Bio-Hybrid Ivan. He constantly blurts out embarassing thoughts outloud, not realizing his mistake even when Namani and Yoshi inform him they can hear every word he's saying.
  • In Rinne, chapter 28, Egawa gives one, and it's lampshaded.
    "What an easy-to-understand soliloquy."
  • Chopper of One Piece combines this with I'm Standing Right Here when he both thinks out loud and badmouths his hosts because he'd thought them crude primitives at first glance.
  • Pretty much the trademark of Shinji Ibu. Hilariously invoked in one of his Image songs and the Talk time track of said CD, which is basically Shinji mumbling nonstop.
  • Elgala from Excel♥Saga is an odd example of this. These moments are presented in word balloons normally reserves for Inner Monologues, suggesting that she really is just thinking to herself instead of out loud. And yet everyone can inexplicably hear what she's thinking anyway.

     Comic Books 
  • Deadpool, as Medium Aware as he is, sometimes thinks out loud completely unintentionally. This "outer monologue" often still uses the narrative boxes. Example from Cable & Deadpool issue 30:
    Mr Immortal: "We are not feebs!"
    Deadpool: Hey, that's twice now. What's going on here?
    Big Bertha: "You're saying everything out loud!"
    Deadpool: I am?
    Big Bertha: "Yes!"
    Deadpool: Oh. Weird. Coulda sworn I was in first person narrative form.
  • Mickey Mouse Comic Universe: A downright ridiculous example is the Disney comic "The Mystery of the Old Mansion", where the villain is busy with his work, unaware of anything else being present, and suddenly, for no reason, he spontaneously decides to recite four pages' worth of backstory, complete with dramatic acting.
    • Lampshaded in "Snow It Goes", where the villain, in the middle of his soliloquy, mentions that he's going to use the money gained from his scheme for psychiatric therapy to cure his urge to talk to himself.
  • Extremely common in Super Hero comics in general, at least as recently as the Bronze Age. Characters' thoughts would be written in regular round voice bubbles half the time, rather than bumpy thought bubbles, indicating that they were speaking out loud. It would frankly be easier to list superheroes of the era who did not do this.
    • Of particular note though is the cover of Amazing Fantasy #15, where Spider-Man announces quite clearly that he is Peter Parker while holding a ne'er-do-well in one hand, thus telling him his Secret Identity.
      • Retconned in the more recent Amazing Fantasy series in a two-page story called "I was the Guy in Spider-Man's Armpit," where he was just a White Collar Worker who fell out of his office window and Spider-Man saved. He was too busy screaming in terror to hear what Spider-Man was saying.
  • Doctor Doom does this a lot. In Secret Wars, Klaw calls him out on it, asking if Doom is taping himself. Doom then reveals that he is, because "Every utterance of Doom must be recorded for posterity!"

    Fanfic 

    Film 
  • In the first Austin Powers movie, after Austin himself is thawed out, he monologues out loud his desire to sleep with this movie's Bond Girl, then realizes that everyone in the room heard him. That is an example of Did I Just Say That Out Loud?, but when he says a side effect of the cryonic freezing process has left him with no inner monologue, that is Thinking Loudly.
  • In Waterworld, the main characters meet a tramp sailor who's been alone on his ship so long, he talks out loud to himself without realizing he's doing it. He even mutters his own thoughts of betraying them in front of the new arrivals.
  • Lampshaded in the Children of the Corn (2009) remake, in which the harried hero's verbal monologue is echoed by his inner monologue, culminating with him both saying and thinking to himself that he needs to stop talking to himself.

    Literature 
  • Happens in a big way in Patrick Ness's Chaos Walking series. Noise is basically broadcasting your thoughts.
  • Miles Vorkosigan does this a lot, in keeping with his hyperactive and not-entirely-stable personality. He mentions on one occassion that he likes to think out loud because it slows down his thoughts to the point where he can get a good look at them, and also admits that very few people can stand to listen to him for long. On another occassion he actually uses this - ranting about how everyone always thinks Ivan is the smart one, and the bad guys have exposed their entire scheme for the sake of grabbing the expendable Barrayaran, and it's been like this since they were kids, y'know... - to provide a distraction for an ally, who takes so long to spring her ambush that even Miles starts to worry he's going to run out of things to say.

     Live Action Television 
  • Doctor Who:
  • The characters on Criminal Minds often do this if someone else isn't present, usually starting with "I'm the UNSUB." Lampshaded in one episode when Prentiss was muttering about what she was doing (reenacting the victim's last moments) when another character came up behind her.
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: By Inferno's Light. Garak is working in a tight, enclosed space inside the wall to rewire a computer system so the group can escape a Dominion internment camp. After turning off the only light source he has, which is beginning to die on him, he begins talking to himself which is really Thinking Out Loud. The talking to himself is also justified in that he's in the process of spiralling down into a full blown claustrophobic attack and he's desperately trying to avert the attack he can feel approaching by pep-talking himself. This is convenient because it's also the only way the audience learns he has a history of claustrophobia and how it started which, for such a private character who loathes revealing weakness, would never have been something the audience would have otherwise learned.
  • In the Supernatural episode "All Hell Breaks Loose, Part One" (S02, Ep21), Dean continues to declare his love of pie after Sam leaves him alone in the car.

    Radio 
  • Radio Dramas are prone to this, because, you know, how would you tell the difference between narration and someone talking to himself?

    Theatre 

     Video Games 
  • Some of Yasha's dialogue from chapter 15 is talking to himself, there is someone else present who clearly isn't listening. He continues it a bit in the next chapter, except this time that person is listening.
    Yasha: Deus, so this is your decision... But this is—
    Asura: Stop talking to yourself!
  • In point and click adventure games where there's no narrator the player characters do this to explain things to the player. often lampshaded and mocked in less serious ones.
  • Dr. Robotnik of Sonic the Hedgehog has a tendency to do this.
  • Happens often in Persona 3, and quite mysteriously while characters are alone...in their rooms. Perhaps a sign of Sanity Slippage?
  • Dr. Mordin Solus of Mass Effect 2. Verbal traits make highly memorable character. Audio-visual documentation available. He addresses this directly in Mass Effect 3, stating (as mentioned below in Real Life) that he's an auditory learner, and that speaking to himself helps him organize his thought processes.
  • This is something Lara Croft does in Tomb Raider (2013), which given her situation is perfectly realistic and understandable.
  • The Team Galactic Grunt in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl and Pokémon Platinum who set off the bomb in the Great Marsh does this while you follow him.

    Webcomic 

     Western Animation 
  • Professor Farnsworth, in the Futurama episode The Sting, does this intentionally to get a point across:
    "No no, I'm not saying that. But I'm certainly thinking it loudly."
  • Dib from Invader Zim did this so often that his outer monologues eventually were punctuated exclusively by people confused about this, including he himself wondering why he does it.
  • A version of this occurs in Phineas and Ferb with Candace constantly talking to herself, pointing to that she also assumes everyone she knows has heard what she said. Played for laughs when she tells Phineas she's gonna call mom "...And this time I'm not using the banana!"
  • Jimmy Two-Shoes from the episode Jimmy and Beezy on the Run: "Maybe you're right. Maybe Miseryville has finally gotten to the Jimmy! Maybe, just maybe... I've gone bad!"

     Real Life 
  • Some people really do catch themselves doing this sometimes, or so I tell myself.
    • The tendency can be aggravated in periods of extreme stress or tiredness.
    • It can also be 'aggravated' if one who does this a lot of the time is in an energetic mood.
  • Repeatedly and unconsciously speaking your thoughts out loud is one of the less well-known symptoms on the Autistic Spectrum.
  • Persons living with ADD or ADHD, some learning disabilities or traumatic brain injuries that impair attention or concentration, and recovering stimulant addicts are actually often encouraged to use this as a coping mechanism for deficits in attention and concentration. It works to some degree to combat lack of focus and forgetfulness.
  • Some people who acquired an hearing impairment, that use to sub-vocalize their thoughts, tend to do so. Can become quite tiresome for the people around them, as they find themselves forced to filter out the incessant flow of thoughts to find the phrases that are actually addressed to them.
  • Depending on how one processes information, hearing the information can help with reasoning through it or holding details in memory until dealt with.
  • Common among artists, musicians, and writers while working, as a means of information processing or keeping track of what they are doing, especially if they are still developing familiarity with a computer program, for example, or they are working in a second language. To anyone unfamiliar, this may be taken as a sign of being The Mentally Disturbed, but one way to tell the difference is that this kind of self-talk is generally related to a process (anything from the words of a written blog post to "move this track two down, volume up here, tempo change on the drums" or similar) or almost incoherent with broken words related to the process possibly in both languages because it's mumbled - it isn't usually conversational dialogue as if the person is talking to someone.

Talking to the DeadExternalizing Internal MonologueWhole Episode Flashback
'They Still Belong to Us" LectureSpeeches and MonologuesThrowing Out The Script
Talking Is a Free ActionExpositionThird Person Flashback
That Was ObjectionableDialogueThis Is for Emphasis, Bitch!

alternative title(s): Soliloquy
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